Is this a bad idea?

RIDDIM

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I used to do that years ago, back when I had a 702 series Yamaha bass drum with a reinforcement post up the middle and was playing with a few toms and a splash cymbal or 2 flying off the center post. This was before racks.

For the past 20 years or so, I have found I can do more with less - and most of the calls I get generally don't need elaborate kits.

The 702 bass drum is long gone. If I need a bunch of stuff up front these days I just fly it off an Icon rack.
 

gretschdrummer

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So, no sputnik antenas on the Blaemire I guess? ;-)

Joking aside, Squirrel: if, as David suggested, there is a possible issue with cracking over time, it is a good incentive to learn to play quieter. I used to love bashing like the kit owed me money, but lately, with new neighbors, I kinda forced myself to adjust my playing. That was reinforced by Carter Mclean's online course. He constantly emphasizes the point of learning to play cleanly at low volume. And he's one of the best sounding guys out there. Plus, it is great to be able to play for an hour or 2 and not have a tinnitus ringing in your ears for hours afterwards. These unorthodox cymbal stands could be a blessing in disguise. ;-)
Bashing the kit like it owed you money

Priceless!!!!!!!!
 

Elvis

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Nice color on those drums too, looks sharkskinnish.
Ok, be honest...how many of us out there started singing "baby shark" to themselves, as soon as they read that.
C'MON! YOU KNOW WHO YOU ARE! :-D

...shark plays drums, do-da-dododo, shark plays drums, do-da-dododo, shark plays drums do-da-dododo, shark plays drums.....:laughing5:


Elvis
P.S. if you value your sanity, DO NOT SHOW THIS TO YOUR CHILDREN...you've been warned. ;)
 
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TonyVazquez

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Wherever a percussive instrument can be played, as long as it doesn't hurt you ergonomically
nor cause damage to the kit, That is where it shall be mounted.
With lotsa TLC it will hold up on its own and serve your purpose faithfully.
It's the stuff that makes customized drum kits and their drummers individually
stand out on their own.
And if it weren't for setups like that we wouldn't have websites and groups like this.
 

Old Drummer

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If you're doing it just for fun, you can get stands fairly inexpensively.
What you're looking for are l-o-n-g legs on the stand.
This allows the legs to stabilize the stand over a greater area of the stand.
Doesn't have to be super stout or have a lot of bells or whistles. It just has to hold a cymbal.
Look at lower lines offered by anyone, or be super-duper cheap like me, and go back to the generic stuff, like what I was using 30-40 years ago.

Elvis
Off topic, but heavy duty cymbal stands are a pet peeve of mine. Yes, nowadays people are mounting a couple cymbals plus a tom and maybe a mini fridge on the same stand. If that's what you're doing, you need a heavy duty stand. But if all you need a stand to do is hold a cymbal, you really don't the heavy duty stands that even the kids now believe are necessary. I played decades with stands that today would be considered inferior, and I never had a problem.

Also, while a wider base with long legs probably helps, I learned early on that positioning the base of the stand correctly is enough. You look at the angle the stand is prone to fall if you really bash the cymbal and then position one of the legs on the opposite side of the likely fall. This is enough to prevent knocking the cymbal and stand over. If you position the legs such that there's a gap in the direction of the force, then the cymbal and stand might fall.

When shopping for cymbal stands a couple years ago I had to search to find stands flimsy enough for me. Everything I saw was too heavy duty, until I found some cheap Chinese stands. And my motivation wasn't only cost savings. I simply didn't want to haul weight or the bulk of the normal stands today.

Oh well, this is just among my rants.
 

Dumpy

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Off topic, but heavy duty cymbal stands are a pet peeve of mine. Yes, nowadays people are mounting a couple cymbals plus a tom and maybe a mini fridge on the same stand. If that's what you're doing, you need a heavy duty stand. But if all you need a stand to do is hold a cymbal, you really don't the heavy duty stands that even the kids now believe are necessary. I played decades with stands that today would be considered inferior, and I never had a problem.

Also, while a wider base with long legs probably helps, I learned early on that positioning the base of the stand correctly is enough. You look at the angle the stand is prone to fall if you really bash the cymbal and then position one of the legs on the opposite side of the likely fall. This is enough to prevent knocking the cymbal and stand over. If you position the legs such that there's a gap in the direction of the force, then the cymbal and stand might fall.

When shopping for cymbal stands a couple years ago I had to search to find stands flimsy enough for me. Everything I saw was too heavy duty, until I found some cheap Chinese stands. And my motivation wasn't only cost savings. I simply didn't want to haul weight or the bulk of the normal stands today.

Oh well, this is just among my rants.
Positioning is everything.

I guess because I bashed as a younger man and had a few blue label 602’s meet their early demise, I used to tend towards the heaviest hardware I could find. But I digress, when I start gigging again, unless I am in a band with my rack literally clamped down onto a drum riser that is carried by a dolly, I will gig with the lightest stands I can find, only running five cymbals (hats, crash, ride, effects). Heavy weight stands these days are so stout you could hang a cymbal, two mounted toms, an iPad stand, a couple of percussion pieces and a kitchen sink.

The 26” Giant Beat will probably not be gigged LOL
 

Squirrel Man

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Off topic, but heavy duty cymbal stands are a pet peeve of mine. Yes, nowadays people are mounting a couple cymbals plus a tom and maybe a mini fridge on the same stand. If that's what you're doing, you need a heavy duty stand. But if all you need a stand to do is hold a cymbal, you really don't the heavy duty stands that even the kids now believe are necessary. I played decades with stands that today would be considered inferior, and I never had a problem.

Also, while a wider base with long legs probably helps, I learned early on that positioning the base of the stand correctly is enough. You look at the angle the stand is prone to fall if you really bash the cymbal and then position one of the legs on the opposite side of the likely fall. This is enough to prevent knocking the cymbal and stand over. If you position the legs such that there's a gap in the direction of the force, then the cymbal and stand might fall.

When shopping for cymbal stands a couple years ago I had to search to find stands flimsy enough for me. Everything I saw was too heavy duty, until I found some cheap Chinese stands. And my motivation wasn't only cost savings. I simply didn't want to haul weight or the bulk of the normal stands today.

Oh well, this is just among my rants.
I do that also, place a leg pointing toward me or where the instrument is leaning. I also "test" tilt it to see where the risk spot is.

I have Pearl 930 hardware and it's kind of big-ish. I think I'll look for lighter hardware for the other kit when I get to it, my only concern is quality and functionality. Gibraltar hardware is toothed so it has limited range and smaller often means cheaper, I don't want it stripping or bending after a year or two so that might be tricky, or at least that's my concern.
 

Elvis

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Hold a baseball bat vertical, with the heavy end up.
Hold that bat by placing both hands at the opposite end, with your hands together.
It takes a certain amount of "muscle" to hold the bat steady, doesn't it.
Now move the upper hand about 1/3 of the way up the bat and try to hold it steady in the vertical position again.
A lot easier to steady the bat, isn't it.
That is my point about longer legs on a thin stand (or any, really).
The collars that attach the legs to the stand can grip the stand over a larger area, so the legs can do a better job of steadying the stand.
Simple physics.
I've been doing this for a while now and speak from experience.
Positioning the stand can help, but its not a replacement for choosing the better stand to begin with, and calling me out and stating what I posted can be replaced by positioning is complete BS and I don't appreciate it.

Elvis
 

Dumpy

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Hold a baseball bat vertical, with the heavy end up.
Hold that bat by placing both hands at the opposite end, with your hands together.
It takes a certain amount of "muscle" to hold the bat steady, doesn't it.
Now move the upper hand about 1/3 of the way up the bat and try to hold it steady in the vertical position again.
A lot easier to steady the bat, isn't it.
That is my point about longer legs on a thin stand (or any, really).
The collars that attach the legs to the stand can grip the stand over a larger area, so the legs can do a better job of steadying the stand.
Simple physics.
I've been doing this for a while now and speak from experience.
Positioning the stand can help, but its not a replacement for choosing the better stand to begin with, and calling me out and stating what I posted can be replaced by positioning is complete BS and I don't appreciate it.

Elvis
Positioning is everything, but so is buying the correct stand. Positioning poorly on the correctly sized stand is harder to do.

I truly hope you didn’t think I was call you out, as I was not. I respect what you bring to this board.
 


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