"Jazz" cymbals made easy.

pgm554

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After years of playing and developing an ear for what I like and dislike ,it's about 30 seconds for me.
Cymbals ,unlike drums can't be tuned.
They are what they are.
 

ThomasL

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Makes you wonder how folks can buy ride cymbals sight unseen over the internet without playing them first.
A video/sound file, the weight, and a good profile pic is about the best you can do under those circumstances.

If you buy (and sell) a few hundred, you'll likely find a handful of that makes you comfortable.
 

Tommy D

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Cymbals ,unlike drums can't be tuned.
They are what they are.
Thats a bit of an over simplification. Cymbals can sound radically different by changing your stick weight, taper, tip shape, tip material, etc. Hit the bell with the shank of the stick or tip, two totally different sounds. You can shape and mold the cymbal to sound very different. Its not just a one note thing.

A cymbal you may not think sounds good when you play it may sound like angels singing when someone else plays it. A lot of it is in the player and how they put their input in to that cymbal.

Now, a cymbal can't be tuned up like a drum head can be tightened, but cymbals can change in pitch, wash, and overtone all by where on the cymbal you play. Play at the edge and the pitch is lower, the wash is greater and your overtones from the bell are far less apparent. Move up the bow of the cymbal and that wash decreases, the pitch goes up and the ring of the bell starts to come in to play.

So I can't just go with the idea that cymbals "are what they are" because so many things can change the way that cymbal sounds.
 

pgm554

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The most important cymbals are the ones you use the most.
In jazz ,it's normally a ride cymbal followed high hat or if your Bill Stewart, 2 more ride cymbals.
99% of the time ,I'm riding a ride cymbal with maybe a bell bell lick here and there.
Crash cymbals and miscellaneous specialties not so much.
Those I can buy mail order and not be so worried about their qualities.
If a ride cymbal doesn't have that single sonic quality ,it's no good to me.

As for growing in or out of a instrument sound,I've been playing a Fibes snare for many, many years and excellence never changes if it was there in the first place..
 

tkillian

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Makes you wonder how folks can buy ride cymbals sight unseen over the internet without playing them first.
I've played cymbals that on paper looked to be just killer, only to discover they kind of sucked in real life.
Had that happen to me on a used 22 inch Sabian Manhattan jazz ride that was like a $150 bucks.
No matter how much I played it ,it just was not hip.
I dont know how you can SELL a cymbal without video/ sound.

Ive been buying and selling for 20 years. I still cant tell whether a cymbal sounds good or bad by a photo.

Maybe..just maybe..a paiste 2002 or signature...those are pretty consistent.
 

Matched Gripper

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I dont know how you can SELL a cymbal without video/ sound.

Ive been buying and selling for 20 years. I still cant tell whether a cymbal sounds good or bad by a photo.

Maybe..just maybe..a paiste 2002 or signature...those are pretty consistent.
Yes, I think of Paiste cymbals like Penn tennis balls. You’ve seen one, you’ve seen them all.
 

tkillian

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Yes, I think of Paiste cymbals like Penn tennis balls. You’ve seen one, you’ve seen them all.
Except for Sound Creations, dark energy, paiste trads and masters. Those vary enough that i need to hear it.
Especially the paiste traditional medium light 22". Ive owned 5. All completely different beasts.
 

toddbishop

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Playability? With the best ones you just do what you want to do and the cymbal handles it. I don't mind cymbals that require a little bit of care; uncontrollable monsters, no thanks. All cymbals good for riding, crashing, accents. Not too loud/piercing bell sound.

Sound wise: a straightforward complex sound with some warmth. Overly dark is not good, there needs to be something happening in the high end, too. Too much character is also not good-- like bad wallpaper, using Peter Erskine's line from another context.
 

mlayton

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Makes you wonder how folks can buy ride cymbals sight unseen over the internet without playing them first.
I've played cymbals that on paper looked to be just killer, only to discover they kind of sucked in real life.
Had that happen to me on a used 22 inch Sabian Manhattan jazz ride that was like a $150 bucks.
No matter how much I played it ,it just was not hip.
I buy lots of vintage Avedis cymbals. That's the one thing that I actually love about buying them is the mystery of what the sound is going to be. I feel that I usually have a general idea. Have been surprised on a few. Sometime in a good way and sometimes in a bad. But....I have also bought these same cymbals and thought it was so so and put it aside for a bit only to revisit later. Then LOVED the sound. Go figure. It happens. I changed. The cymbal didn't change.

Mike
 


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