Jazz Drumming: Baby Steps to Giant Steps

bigbonzo

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Does anyone have "Baby Steps to Giant Steps: The Road To Jazz Drumming; One Tempo At A Time" by Peter Retzlaff and Jim Rupp.

I am embarking on the journey of jazz drumming and would like to know what folks think of this book.

I am very casual friends with Jim Rupp and recently bought my marimba from his store.
 
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gmiller598

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Does anyone have "Baby Steps to Giant Steps: Turn It Up & Lay It Down Series".

I am embarking on the journey of jazz drumming and would like to know what folks think of this book.
I have it but haven't played along with it much yet. That being said, I'll trust anything with Jim Rupp's name attached to it.
 

Swissward Flamtacles

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The playalongs sound better than most others I know. The notated 4 bar solos are also nice. I'd say it's well worth it, especially as it's one of the cheaper books out there.
 

RIDDIM

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I have it but haven't played along with it much yet. That being said, I'll trust anything with Jim Rupp's name attached to it.
I don't know Jim, but I can vouch for Pete. I've seen a few of his students at jam sessions locally and they play the music and the instrument well. One of them has made huge leaps over the past 2 years; he attributes this to his time with Pete.
 

Matched Gripper

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Does anyone have "Baby Steps to Giant Steps: The Road To Jazz Drumming; One Tempo At A Time" by Peter Retzlaff and Jim Rupp.

I am embarking on the journey of jazz drumming and would like to know what folks think of this book.

I am very casual friends with Jim Rupp and recently bought my marimba from his store.
I have several CD’s from the “Turn it Up, Lay it Down,” music minus drums play along series, including “Baby Steps to Giant Steps.” Excellent practice tool! Trading 4’s at 100 bpm can be an eye opener. Bought them at GC iirc. Didn’t know there was a book.
 

Matched Gripper

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Good luck , I’m really struggling with jazz .
Highly recommend “Advanced Techniques for the Modern Drummer,” and “The Art of Bop Drumming,” a metronome and a qualified teacher. Just as important, practice playing along to jazz standards.
 

dingaling

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If you really want to learn jazz, you need a teacher who plays jazz. If you don’t really want to learn jazz, you won’t learn it. It’s not a “I think I’ll try this a little bit” type of thing. It’s not a “I’ll lean this in a week” or “be playing jazz gigs in a year” type thing either.

The word I’ve heard from all the great jazz drummer is they “immersed” themselves in the music. Which includes the study of the music and drumming over many years.

There are several components to jazz drumming: a specific set of coordination between the 4 limbs (which books like stick control and syncopation are good for combined with time tested techniques of practicing them on the kit), a specific set of vocabulary (which is only arrived at after years and years of painstaking transcribing the greats), feel (which comes of watching the greats live for years and discovering how they hit the drums and get their sound and why they do it when they do it), snare chops (rudiments, single and doubles, wilcoxen books), reading charts (which books are good for so you can get a chart on a gig or recording session and interpret the notes as musical phrases and forms so you know when and what to play), knowing jazz tunes (get a real book and learn those tunes on the kit, there are hundreds of standards), and a systematic study of the history of the music starting with early big band (or even rag time/early blues) and going through be bop, fusion, and up to modern jazz which has developed into improvising forms over odd times in many cases.
To learn jazz you need to wake up and listen to the music from morning until night. It needs to be part of your life.

If you need inspiration, check out Philly joe Jones with Miles Davis, Art Taylor, Tony Williams, Buddy Rich and Mel Lewis, papa Joe Jones, Kenny Clarke, Roy Haynes, Elvin Jones, Jack Dejohnette, and modern drummers like Carl Allen, Louis Nash, Bill Stewart, Kenny Washington, Brian Blade, and so many more. Due to steaming (love it or hate it), it’s never been easier to listen to all of these drummers. We used to have to save up and actually buy the records.

Jazz is not some movie about a college kid in music school, it’s not 20 second instagram clips of jamming along with fast old jazz records, it’s not about knowing a beat and a couple fills. It’s a massive undertaking almost anyone can do “if they really want it”. And it starts with a good teacher who can already play jazz. From there after an year or two in training you’ll probably start going to jam sessions to get some experience, and bloom from there.

Not one drummer ever just work up and could play jazz, not Tony Williams, not Bill Stewart, not Brian Blade. Each of those drummers “put in the work, the time, the study and practice”. Many of them got an early start which is a big help but not necessary. They all wanted it badly. If you do too, you’ll get it.

Sorry for the long rant. All of this information I’m giving is to help anyone who wants to learn jazz. (And for free so take it!)
 

bigbonzo

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If you really want to learn jazz, you need a teacher who plays jazz. If you don’t really want to learn jazz, you won’t learn it. It’s not a “I think I’ll try this a little bit” type of thing. It’s not a “I’ll lean this in a week” or “be playing jazz gigs in a year” type thing either.

The word I’ve heard from all the great jazz drummer is they “immersed” themselves in the music. Which includes the study of the music and drumming over many years.

There are several components to jazz drumming: a specific set of coordination between the 4 limbs (which books like stick control and syncopation are good for combined with time tested techniques of practicing them on the kit), a specific set of vocabulary (which is only arrived at after years and years of painstaking transcribing the greats), feel (which comes of watching the greats live for years and discovering how they hit the drums and get their sound and why they do it when they do it), snare chops (rudiments, single and doubles, wilcoxen books), reading charts (which books are good for so you can get a chart on a gig or recording session and interpret the notes as musical phrases and forms so you know when and what to play), knowing jazz tunes (get a real book and learn those tunes on the kit, there are hundreds of standards), and a systematic study of the history of the music starting with early big band (or even rag time/early blues) and going through be bop, fusion, and up to modern jazz which has developed into improvising forms over odd times in many cases.
To learn jazz you need to wake up and listen to the music from morning until night. It needs to be part of your life.

If you need inspiration, check out Philly joe Jones with Miles Davis, Art Taylor, Tony Williams, Buddy Rich and Mel Lewis, papa Joe Jones, Kenny Clarke, Roy Haynes, Elvin Jones, Jack Dejohnette, and modern drummers like Carl Allen, Louis Nash, Bill Stewart, Kenny Washington, Brian Blade, and so many more. Due to steaming (love it or hate it), it’s never been easier to listen to all of these drummers. We used to have to save up and actually buy the records.

Jazz is not some movie about a college kid in music school, it’s not 20 second instagram clips of jamming along with fast old jazz records, it’s not about knowing a beat and a couple fills. It’s a massive undertaking almost anyone can do “if they really want it”. And it starts with a good teacher who can already play jazz. From there after an year or two in training you’ll probably start going to jam sessions to get some experience, and bloom from there.

Not one drummer ever just work up and could play jazz, not Tony Williams, not Bill Stewart, not Brian Blade. Each of those drummers “put in the work, the time, the study and practice”. Many of them got an early start which is a big help but not necessary. They all wanted it badly. If you do too, you’ll get it.

Sorry for the long rant. All of this information I’m giving is to help anyone who wants to learn jazz. (And for free so take it!)
All I asked was what you think of the book that I mentioned. I did not ask for a long dissertation.
 

dingaling

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All I asked was what you think of the book that I mentioned. I did not ask for a long dissertation.
I get it. I did say sorry.

Sorry for the hijack. I used to be a teacher and I remember students asking me what book was good to learn jazz. That was always my intro discussion.

But yea, not what you asked.
I actually haven’t used that book.
 


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