Jazz players? LSR choices?

bfulton

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Many of the other jazz players I know use a LSR for a change to the B section, or for a soloist. I’d guess it’s very common - kind of like the 18” bass.
So, how is your LSR different than your main ride? Pitched higher? Lower? Smaller diameter?
Why?

Mine has often usually been a little smaller, often with rivets, and a bit higher pitch. But I don’t have any idea why - or if - that’s desirable.

Just curious. Plus, some new cymbals soon...
 

pwc1141

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I have a 19" Bosphorus Turk flat ride as my left side ride. Very mellow with lots of stick definition but virtually no "wash". My right side ride is a 21" Anatolian that is brighter and lots of wash.
 

JDA

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Old K 18" (14xx-15xx g) are and always have been the top of my list never fail. I happen also to have four of them, and they've gotten a lot of use over the years # different sound eras. These are all Rides in the Classical sense. That's how Old K approached cymbals. (their only knowledge of, really) Symphonic cymbals (not always) paired.

Second, my 19" Antique Bosphorus Thin Ride (ride not stinkin crash) 1633g I don't see too many. (thank you slinginit wherever you are)

Everything else to me, is just, everything else..(had soundcreations istanbuls italians avedis and more)
18"/19" medium Rides are -basically- what you want.
hand hammered all the better

Very few are still made today. Most kids want crash, crash, CRASH in that spot so that is what many manufacturers cater to.
I've never been one to use a full-20" on left side. Old K, A, didn't matter -too much of a main (too low of a) pitch. Rarely if never a 20" left anythings possible but practically never. Never had a 20" I could call a left side ride. (too much to carry anyway for a 3-4 hour gig ha)

Plus sometimes you have Sight line (can't see out) problems with too many large diameter cymbals (gotta keep an eye out for incoming) depending on how you angle them. I have used two 20's but
 
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Joe A

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My only jazz explorations are home. But, as such, I've got on the left side of my practice kit now a 20" Mehmet Legend (their version of the Agop Mel Lewis, I guess), weighing in at 1828g. It's dark and somewhat trashy, with a nice stick. The right is my 22" Bosphorus Trad in 2610g, and it's about as heavy as such a ride ought to get imho.
 

Targalx

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For my bop kit, I am running an 18" Manhattan crash as a LSR, since I rarely ever really "crash" in a bop combo (especially one that has me playing brushes at least 50% of the set). The 18" Manhattan makes a perfectly good ride for my needs.

On the right side, I'm using a 20" Manhattan ride and I recently added a 22" Istanbul Mehmet Flat Ride with rivets right above it.
 

jsp210

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An 18" K Dark Thin Crash on the left side is my go to choice for Jazz and pretty much anything else when I'm not having to contend with a wall of amplifiers on a bigger stage.
 

paul

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Knowing the LSR without knowing the RSR seems incomplete to me. That said, I like a contrast between the two cymbals, so that the difference is immediately audible. Usually my main ride is either a 22" K Custom or an old 22" A medium. LSR is a 70's 20" A with two rivets, and I also have a 20" A china trash for a third option (it really does work).
 

multijd

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18,19,20 even a 22 higher pitched than the main ride. Sometimes a 19” flat ride. Sometimes rivets (or chain).
 

gmiller598

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I just added the Sabian Crescent 20" Wide Ride to my left side to go with the 22" Wide Ride on the right side. If I need change it up to anything smaller I think I can move the 20" to the right side and then out the Trash Crash back there since it has some nice ride qualities.
 

Drumbumcrumb

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Smaller, higher, rivets - great minds think alike. 19” ‘Beautiful Baby’. I love it for a LSR, it’s a nice soft wash, feels great for a small ride, and crashes beautifully. Easy to get a nice ‘bwoosh’ with a little stick shoulder, no clang. Some rides (especially smaller) it’s all or nothing for crashes, if you try for a light crash you get a horrifyingly unjazzy bwoooong. Gotta have that wobbly thin edge that just opens right up, love that.
 

SwivoNut

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Small band: LSR = 20 thin sizzle, RSR = 22 thin
Big band: LSR = 20 med, RSR = 20 med heavy

Because that's what my favorite drummers play.
 

Neal Pert

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My rules are:

1. Always a bit smaller than the main ride (2"-3")
2. Always washier and noticeably different in pitch than the main ride
3. Always useable as a second ride cymbal that I like as much as the main one.
4. Always crashable

I mean, these aren't rules, exactly, but it's what I'm most comfortable with.

The cymbals that have held that spot the longest are a 20" K Con MTL (paired with a 22" Skiba-modded Zildjian Hi Def) and a 19" K Con Crash/Ride paired with a 22" K Con Medium or 22" K Con Overhammered Bounce.
 

toddbishop

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The cymbal on the right is your main voice, so I want it to be solid, with the one on the left a little airier. Or I have an 18" medium with some rivets, which is heavier than my main ride. Half the time I don't bother with a second ride, I just put a 17" crash on the left. The one I have is ridable anyway.

These are all Cymbal & Gong Holy Grail-- 22" ride, 20" ride, 18" ride, 17" crash.
 

Seb77

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Take a look at thise thread, at least my answer would be pretty similar: https://www.drumforum.org/threads/recommend-a-crash-ride.169892/page-2#post-1886755

Here's a setup I like: the first cymbal is a 19" A Avedis on the left, then a KCon MTL 20" on the right. Interesting to read people use this one on the left, to me it would be a bit too meaty and low-pitched for that purpose most of the time, but it shows tastes differe, and descriptions lare relative.
https://soundcloud.com/seb234%2F19-a-avedis-20-kcon-mth-lo
 

bfulton

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Nice. Thanks Seb and all.
My driving wheel here is a pending order with Craig Lauritsen. This whole thread helps me articulate the sort of sound.
plus there’s a wait - I mean, it’s hard not to think about it!
 

bongomania

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I like a contrast, with the LSR being higher pitched and either trashier (like my 19” Agop 30th) or pingier (like one of my Agop or Paiste flat rides). In a perfect world I’d have both, for three rides total. I’ve done that a bunch of times but I usually don’t have that much stage space.
 

cribbon

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I have a LS nuthin'. A while ago I stopped using a crash when playing jazz/jazz-ish stuff. Even so, I do use two 18" rides (a Sabian Prototype with a raw bell & 4 rivets and a Paiste 2002 flat ride) with both located on the right side. The flat ride is positioned below and slightly underlapping the main ride. I can go back and forth between them quickly and easily with literally just a flick of the wrist. Not having a crash helps keep me focused on playing time and the two rides have very distinct sounds, so I can mix it up constantly without having to switch and/or cross hands or move too far up, down or around to do so. If I need to crash, I just either smack my 13" Paiste Signature hats or give the Sabian a firm whack. Low and slow is how I go, but this layout is also great for playing fast without killing yourself.

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