Just got back from the worst concert in my life !

CSR

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Meatloaf played a show at the casino that I work at a few years back. The backup singer was the only one who held a note whatsoever, she was amazing actually. Meatloaf however would vocally divebomb past the intended note and end up.... well... in a meaty gargle of sadness. It was painful but man I have respect for Patti Russo who saved every song that night.
“...meaty gargle of sadness.” What a great line! Could be a good name for the next emo band.
 

richardh253

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George played Slingerland, Ludwig and then Slingerland again and in the 89-90 reunion Pearl. i was a huge poco fan But don’t recall ever seeing him play Rogers or Gretsch. On a strange Old Grey Whistle Test he plays a back line Hayman kit with one bass head....on the wrong side.
Free Poco concert Fairleigh Dickinson U NJ April 1973. George is playing dark wood natural Ludwig B/O badge 14 x 22 9x13, 14x14, 16x16. He mounted his splash on the right side of the Ludwig dbl tom holder. I was so into Poco that I tried to remove the BDP wrap on my 66 Ludwigs to get down to the natural wood finish. Big mistake. Also, that's Tim Schmidt on bass before he decamped Poco for the Eagles in
'79. Always thought Poco was superior (and much nicer folks) but had bad mgmt and Epic records was lame in promoting. Never got the Eagles, but they were "the successful" band.
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old_K_ride

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I was a big Robert Cray fan. His sound is always great as is his playing. He got political one night in my hometown. Good Bye Robert!
they just can't help themselves...they believe everyone in attendance votes the same as they do...NOW they'll tell you flat out DON'T COME TO MY SHOW and UNFOLLOW ME on Social Media.
 

BillyCarl

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I've walked out on three concerts. Lou Reed coz he was too commercial, and Vanilla Fudge twice, coz they were too stupid and obnoxious. (Both times they came on toward the end of a daylong festival)
 

Vistalite Black

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they just can't help themselves...they believe everyone in attendance votes the same as they do...NOW they'll tell you flat out DON'T COME TO MY SHOW and UNFOLLOW ME on Social Media.
I'm pretty sure it's a calculated decision in that there are certain fans they don't want -- ie. people who like blues and related themes -- hardship, injustice, discrimination and inequality -- but don't want to hear those same topics spoken about.

 

5 Style

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Other than jazz shows at small clubs, one of the last things that I saw was Reverend Horton heat. I'm not a huge fan of this guy's music, but I like him and have seen him play several times, since when he began in the 90s. Terrible show and I put little to no blame on him or his band. The sound was just terrible. Mixed too loud with no dynamics, the string bass sounded like only the muddiest notes from the biggest disco subwoofer (no definition of notes, just a drone). I couldn't make out any of the lyrics, etc... The folks I went with loved it, but I no longer can enjoy anything that so poorly mixed.

I feel like for rock/pop music the bar is very low for live sound. Jazz is differnt, which is one reason why I've been enjoying those kind of shows a lot more. There's typically some attention to detail with that kind of thing. I no longer care so much about seeing a band "put on a show," as I'd much rather check out a greoup that's really playing well and has a good mix, even if they're staring at the floor the whole time than one that's really reacting to the crowd and has some sort of stage show, but the sound is lacking. Music is all about sound, right... so it seems that this should be the part that bands 9and venues) focus on...
 

JimmySticks

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I used to see the Allman Bros Band at the Fillmore East almost every year, and they usually always put on a great show. But there was a point (early 90s?) where Dickey Betts just started playing SO loud, that it was really obnoxious. You couldn't make out a note and he drowned out the whole band. Ears bled, heads ached as he jammed on without care. I didn't know it at the time, but I read that the bass player at the time was said to have been pleading with him to turn it down, or he would be forced to quit to save his hearing! Well, he quit in tears because Dickey was a Dickey and kept amping it up.

The Who was another obnoxiously loud band. Terrible in concert.
 

DamnSingerAlsoDrums

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The worst concert I've seen by an artist who I was actually looking forward to see was Aerosmith. Now i'm not that much of a fan per se but they have a full catalog of great riffs and catchy, well crafted, old school rock tunes. I was under the impression that a band of this magnitude and history would sound amazing and be tight AF. Boy was I dead wrong.

First the show wasn't part of a tour or anything, it was a one-off so obviously, there were lots of rusty goofs and mistakes. This I can understand. But it was also on the coat tails of Tyler leaving to do that reality TV show (Voice? Idol? Idk, don't watch either). It was clear as day that this gig was a "we got paid too much to say no" type of deal... So Tyler was back in, with a VERY obviously pissed off band, Perry even more so than the others. It was sad verging on pathetic to see Tyler work all his rocking moves trying to rub shoulders with his old pals and getting at best no eye contact back. Perry would sometimes look at him in a "don't you dare get near me" fashion and otherwise spent the whole gig seething. It was brutal.

And the sound... My god it was horrendous. Perry 10db's over everyone else and nothing in the mix under 200hz... No kick, no bass, no oooomph whatsoever. The openner was a local band and their sound was CD quality so, no issue with the PA...

Now the 25 000 ish drunk crowd didn't seem to mind at all, most sang with their fist up in the air. Maybe it's because I was in a band and sometimes, while watching concerts, I can pick up on subtle cues that my non-musician friends are oblivious to. But subtle, this was NOT. The tension and resentment up there was like a Neon painted garbage truck in a lavender field. I left probably half an hour before the end, having not heard nor seen a single redeeming thing coming from that stage.

Good thing I got the VIP pass for free from a friend who PR'd the event. I wanted to have a good time, I really wanted to...
 

green glass drum

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Way back in the 60's, I saw a lot of the psychedelic bands that were big at the time. Many of them were terrible live. First of all, they were amateur musicians. Second, they were all stoned out of their minds. Third, they had no stage presence. Just a bunch of long haired, slovenly hippies, wandering around the stage, playing out of tune. Of course, the audience was a bunch of stoned hippies, too, so they thought it was great. I did not.

One exception was a group called Poco. I saw them at an outdoor concert. I can't remember the names of the players, or the drummer. They were upbeat and great entertainers. Their sound was super clean and their set was well-planned. The drummer, who also sang, was exceptional. Can't remember his name.....I remember he was playing Rogers drums. He had them tuned well, and they sounded fantastic.
Poco was a very good band with skilled players and singers. One of the members was Jim Messina and high voiced Timothy B. Schmit.
 

dcrigger

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I'm pretty sure it's a calculated decision in that there are certain fans they don't want -- ie. people who like blues and related themes -- hardship, injustice, discrimination and inequality -- but don't want to hear those same topics spoken about.

Yep and the acts haven't changed.

If you think back to when we were kids, going to Woodstock or watching the Woodstock movie, of course, we heard politics from the stage, from the record - and it wasn't remotely balanced.. it was most decidedly liberal. Because rock always has been decidedly liberal and outspoken about it too. Same with blues.. jazz... Conservative ideas from the stage... one of my first touring gigs was with the King Family... now there was some "Wave The Flag" entertainment from start to finish... so I guess today, that would amount to sticking to country music...

But good luck with finding artists that take no political position. I mean if you want artists on stage to simply be entertainers. Hire a wedding band. Because most artists have things to say... points to make... positions to promote...and throughout the history of rock and roll - those positions have been predominantly... liberal.

I mean I thought we all knew this... Back when we watched the Woodstock movie... I thought we all knew that Hendrix playing the Star Spangled Banner was a giant anti-war protest. All of these years, I thought we all knew what Sly, what Stevie, what Dylan, Guthrie, Hendrix, etc. were singing about. Heck even Tennessee Ernie Ford... they were all singing, all preaching liberalism. That's the history, the value system of rock n roll. Always has been.

It just seems like many of us have changed "teams" as we've gotten older. And sadly don't want to face that they may find themselves cast as the villain in the tales that these artists are singing about. And if it's just their speaking about it - then you probably should really start listening to some lyrics. (Which is odd for me to say - as I usually could care less about lyrics.... but still can tell if a songwriter has a conservative or liberal bent to their writing).

I'm sorry if I've offended anybody - but to state this in terms that artists have changed or recently become intolerant is utter nonsense. They've stayed exactly the same. But I can imagine it is a whole new and unsettling experience to have their intolerance aimed at oneself... Or feel like it is.

There have always been artists that were more neutral the others. But of those that were political at all - which is to say... most of them... They never cared one bit about losing those that were against their vision of the world.... again, why would they be? Those people were the bad guys of the stories they told, the villains in the songs that they sang.

Here's hoping for a better world... and a better, safer America... for all Americans.
 

hsosdrum

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When the "Boston" album suddenly became a huge hit in '76, Tom Scholz (who played everything on the record except for the singing by Brad Delp) had to quickly throw together a band that could tour in support of the album. They played St. Paul on one of the few nights my band didn't have a gig, and our booking agent got us free tickets (he thought he was being nice, and we didn't have the heart to tell him that we weren't fans of the band). Starcastle was the opening band; they tried hard but couldn't overcome the fact that they were little else but a Yes clone.

Boston was simply awful. They had no stage presence at all and played every song 100% exactly as it was played on the record — no fire, no excitement, and no danger, and without those, you just don't have rock'n'roll. Of the several hundred 'name' musicians I've seen in concert they were by far the worst. (The runner-up was The Who in 1982. First tour without Moon; when he died they definitely should have called it quits.)
 

CC Cirillo

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I saw John Hiatt in a club and, as great as he was, the volume was so over the top and unnecessarily loud one could not really discern what was played.
 

Elvis

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After 45 yrs of going to concerts....just saw the worst of my life.
Christopher Cross at the Tupelo Music hall in Derry NH.
1st off the venue has horrible sound, bass heavy no dynamics....blah
Christopher Cross, was uninspired, so was the crowd, then he tried to be funny.
THEN he got political, THEN..I left, never have done that....

I have seen umpteen shows at the Club Casino...it has no right to sound good
but it does, there is always an electric flair in the air...cant explain it.
It has a vibe...it has graced 3, yes 3 centuries...and the artists seem to feel it.
never going back to Tupelo or Chris Cross...a big thumbs down !!
YIKES!
Sorry to hear that.
Hope the next show is a better one.

Elvis
 

Elvis

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(The runner-up was The Who in 1982. First tour without Moon; when he died they definitely should have called it quits.)
I went to that tour when it rolled into my town, too.
I totally agree.
While I absolutely adore Kenny Jones, he was out of his element with The Who.
You're right. They should've followed Zeppelin's lead and called it quits when Moon passed.

Elvis
 

robthedrummer

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Yeah, Chris Cross is a very boring performer. I've seen him a couple of times and kept looking at my watch both times.

On the other hand, one of the best concerts I've ever seen was here in Austin at the notoriously bad-sounding Irwin center (basketball arena) when Stevie Wonder did his 'Songs in the Key of Life' tour. I saw three very large sound boards with 6 guys working them. At one point there were 50 people on stage, some playing tiny shakers, and I could hear each and every instrument crystal clear. Of course the performances by all were amazing. Wonderful concert.
 

Keeper John

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Way back in the 60's, I saw a lot of the psychedelic bands that were big at the time. Many of them were terrible live. First of all, they were amateur musicians. Second, they were all stoned out of their minds. Third, they had no stage presence. Just a bunch of long haired, slovenly hippies, wandering around the stage, playing out of tune. Of course, the audience was a bunch of stoned hippies, too, so they thought it was great. I did not.

One exception was a group called Poco. I saw them at an outdoor concert. I can't remember the names of the players, or the drummer. They were upbeat and great entertainers. Their sound was super clean and their set was well-planned. The drummer, who also sang, was exceptional. Can't remember his name.....I remember he was playing Rogers drums. He had them tuned well, and they sounded fantastic.
His name is George Grantham, excellent tasteful drummer and singer.
 


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