Keeping New Set in Pole Barn

Burnclinic

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Why not just continue playing the already barn-ruined kit at rehearsals and use your new drums on gigs? I wouldn’t leave my brand new gear (or any of my old gear for that matter) in any barn.
Not a bad point. I might just haul them in and out occasionally because I want to play them desperately
 

Deafmoon

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No. Don't do that. I don't know the lowest temperature to store them in, but I can assure you it should not be below 0 degrees celsius. Even wrapped drums are jeopardized at that temperature.
 

Ian S

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Greets Burnclinic, welcome from me who was new not too long ago, too.

I may be a little neurotic, but I agree with the cautionary posts. I wouldn't leave it there set up, going from warmed up while playing it in daytime to the frigid nights, and then from season to changing season, temps all over the map can't be good for these cute new babies. (or older counterparts..)

But yes, take them sometimes to play them and then take them home with you. What I'd do anyhow.
 

bpaluzzi

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I kept my 66 Ludwig Club Dates (wrapped) in an uninsulated shed for 10 years when I was a kid. No problems.

Western PA. as high as 90-100F in the summer, as low as 0-10F in the winter.

I had a space heater / window unit air conditioner in there for when I was in playing, but otherwise they were ambient temperature.
 
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Ian S

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Well, I guess maybe some of us are silly and worry too much.. but IMO there's no harm in that. No one ruined their equipment by being too careful. Or, at least, not very often if it did happen..
 

bassanddrum84

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I would never leave my in a un heated place. I bring my cases into my heated garage or at our practice space very rarely will they stay I. The trailer for longer then three days and that’s usually during spring summer fall. Never winter. I know guitar knecks mess up in cold to hot weather. Warping and all kinds of stuff so I’d imagine drums would too? Not sure but I’m not willing to risk it.
 

felis

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I wouldn't do it. Even if the horses didn't poop on them.
 

hsosdrum

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Break-down your kit after every practice and take it home with you. Think of this the same as not leaving it overnight in a club where it could get stolen. Protect your investment.

Note: When I was on the road between 1972 and 1977 all our band's gear stayed outside in the equipment truck when we weren't playing, even in the depth of five Minnesota winters. However, 1) It was a Vistalite kit, so I wasn't worried about the wood plies getting moist during a gig and then expanding when they freeze, and 2) I was 20 – 25 years old, and an idiot.
 

Heavy Beech

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I wouldn’t take your new kit and new cymbals and use that place as your main rehearsal room. With his older kit or a beater practice kit ? Sure , you could bring your new cymbals ,sticks, etc and use a beater kit for that environment - but bring your cymbals home after practice and leave your prized new kit at home in a more insulated space which is ideal

I’ve done a lot of touring along with local gigs , and yes my drums have been subject to a lot of temperature environments in a trailer with other gear as well as onstage . But in traveling , my drums/ cymbals are in padded Humes and Berg Enduro hard cases. And aside from being onstage they’re always cased when on the road.
Temperatures vary from either extreme but they’re protected and cared for when not on stage in those situations ;

Modern drums seem to hold together with better build quality from all manufacturers , but even with that , extreme cold and especially extreme heat coupled with humidity , moisture in air from hard spring and summer rains ? Those will Be an enemy of gear left setup and exposed in that environment .
That same humidity and moisture in a non insulated barn can/ will collect on your chrome lugs and hardware , which over time can cause premature pitting To your hardware ; that same humidity and expansion of temps can affect your shells too over time . Mabe not right away , but can happen .
Even if your friend is comfortable with it , ( possibly he’s used to it and it doesn’t bother him ) , I would look hard at the temp/ humidity factors of your area , and consider keeping a regular jam kit in use there that isn’t your new ones as far as regular use setup. It’s one thing to bring your new set in for rehearsals on weekends in favorable temperatures , but not a full time thing left setup
 
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sixplymaple

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I wouldn’t do it with my DW Collector’s kit, but I would with my Yamaha Stage Custom Advantage kit lol.
 

KevinD

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At best it is risky, even with a wrapped set. I have stored a wrapped set in my dad's unheated/uninsulated garage in upstate NY... (Probably not as cold as where the OP is but avg winter temps usually hover from around freezing down to 25 F with the seasonal lows probably around 0 to -4 F for a few days to a week each winter). While it is unheated, the humidity is very low in there.
Each drum was kept in a hard case and wrapped in insulated blankets.
Of the 7 wrapped drums, two of them experienced cracks in the wrap (long fissures), the others are fine.
Other than the wrap I noticed no issues with the actual plies themselves and the chrome has remained in good shape.

So it is kind of a crap shoot, I would not risk it, especially with a new drum set.
 

JDA

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See. We're smart.
It took 40 people from around the country maybe around the world to solve this question.

Next we'll answer tension rod loosening on various make of chrome snare drums
 

Erik

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Temperature changes can lead to finish damage in both wrapped and lacquered kits
 

JDA

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yes but gradual over time like season change is pretty neutral
 
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Houndog

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Most “ barn finds “ I see are in great shape .

Let it rip , if it hurts them ; buy more ...
 

SteveParadis

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Hi y’all

I lurk here quite a lot and now I’m happy to say I have my first new kit on the way. As a gift to myself for getting my first job in my career field I splurged and got a Ludwig Classic maple pro beat 24 with Zildjian A’s (391).

my question is this. The last two years playing my buddies kit (Tama star classic) in his un-insulated, non-temperature controlled pole barn. We use a wood burning stove to heat it up in the winter when we’re out there playing. He is of the opinion that the drums will be fine. His star classic remains set up with no protection year round and he doesn’t notice any issues other than some dust. Is he right? I know instruments are finicky, especially when in environments with fluctuating temps and humidity. I want to know if I can leave my drums out there without worrying that they will be destroyed.
I am a relatively new drummer but have been in woodworking for a while. My experience is that temperature (and even worse humidity) negatively effect both solid wood and wood ply over time due to expansion and contraction, potentialy causing deformity and potentially cracking. And it also, in the case of drums, change the sound. Just my experience.The tama Start Classic is a nice set. Treat your baby well! Good luck!
 


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