keeping sticks from breaking

GiveMeYourSmallestSticks!

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I really think that's the biggest factor (technique). If you allow the stick to rebound properly rather than burying it into the head... unless you're just an incredibly heavy hitter... sticks shouldn't be breaking. I can't remember the last time I broke a stick. It was probably high school or maybe college marching band. And I'm 60 now, so that was a REALLY long time ago! lol
Same here. I used to break many more sticks back in high school (along with drum heads and cymbals). Interestingly, I used to use thicker sticks, heads and cymbals compared to what I use now (I use Bopworks Birdland model, a thinner and smaller stick than anything I've found in a store or used in the past). I've developed my technique and use of rebound since high school, and I can't remember a time in since then that I've broken a stick, cymbal or head.

While there could be other factors at play, the biggest is likely technique and drum set ergonomics. While I'm not here to call out the OP's technique, it's well worth considering whether it is a factor for the longevity of your gear, your wallet and your physical health and ability to continue to play for years to come.
 

dale w miller

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I don't know what I did but the other day I split two sticks in a row. Really ticked me off! A combination of a new drumset, taping cymbals to quiet them and wanted to try new sticks last year (Vic Firth SD2's) after using 5A's forever. I didn't realize the new sticks are maple, so maybe too soft for me.

In the old days, we all used to wrap the tapered shaft with electrical tape. Kept a number of sticks alive, even after starting to break. :)
I have been playing them almost exclusively since the 90’s. My only complaint is I wish they were a bit longer.

I wear them out, not break them. See my picture above.
 

prplx

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Avoid rim shots on the snare for the time being. Even if you love it. Rim shots are the stick killers.
 

Iristone

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Never broke a stick, but always chip down the tips of Promark sticks. Or maybe my cat is secretly playing with (and chewing on) them.
 

On the one

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When I was in my thrash/death metal band I broke 1 pair of sticks at the shoulder. Fast forward 30+ years later I bought 4 pairs of sticks from a SA that was relocating so the entire store was 30% off. I bought 2 pairs of Vater 5A, Regal Tip 5B, and a Pro Mark stick can't remember the weight. Within a month all 4 pairs broke split at the shoulder all 8 sticks! I was playing R&B by this time and I was furious! Unfortunately I wasn't a member of DFO at the time because I would have came straight here. However after talking to others about this situation I was informed that these sticks I bought could have been old and dried out making them brittle, therefore causing them to break. I'm not completely sold on this theory but does makes a little sense only because it was 3 different manufacturers. What's the chances of 8 sticks, 3 different manufacturers getting the same wood? :dontknow: Anyway I haven't broken anymore sticks since then. Im not sure what you can do to prolong the longevity of a stick, maybe try a harder wood; mahogany, oak, now there's even sticks made from bamboo.....;)
 

Rock Salad

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the bamboo is kinda soft and dents a tad more easily than hickory. verdict is still out on the sound- it is different for sure.
 

BoHuggabee

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shipping is back up, but i was expecting a month or more of not being able to get new sticks. the coating method works great! what it does is shaves off the epoxy and rubber just as the wood would have, allowing the wood to remain healthy. so you can keep recoating the sticks, only draw back is that it adds a small amount of foreward weight.
 

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