Learning Percussion - What resources?

chillybase

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Hello friends,
I am thinking about picking up some percussion instruments. Do you have any recommendations on where to learn proper techniques besides YouTube searches (although if there is a good channel I am open to it)?

I'm interested in:
Congas
Bongos
Guiras

My inspiration was this video of this Swedish band called Ixtahuele. I've always enjoyed exotica jazz. Maybe I'll be able to play it. I posted about these guys in another thread.

Also, any idea what size conga and bongos the drummer may be playing in this video?
 

Ghostin one

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This is a great book by Birger Sulsbruck: "LATIN-AMERICAN PERCUSSION Rhythms and rhythm instruments from Cuba and Brazil". It's out of print but you might find a used copy.


It used to come with cassettes, (then c.d.'s ?) but the tracks are on his website now (free)
 

Ghostin one

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I just noticed the question about sizes - the set drummer appears to be playing normal-sized bongos (7 -7.25 and 8.5+) and either a conga or tumba in the snare position.
 

Deafmoon

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I think you will do far better listening to as much latin music as possible & working out what you hear on your own instrument. Take a bit of time with being Free on the instrument to what’s comfortable for you before diving into any teachers or instruction Technical Disciplines. Relax no one learns an instrument in a few years, it takes a lifetime.
 

multijd

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If possible, try to find someone from within the Hispanic community in your area who is the master. Follow that thread. Those lessons will be more useful than any YouTube video.
 

kdgrissom

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I would recommend starting by focusing on the simplest Latin beats in their most original form (i.e. 1930's-1950's) by listening to early recordings. Rumba, Mambo, and Cha-cha-cha for example. We tend to think of them as beats, when in fact they are all dance styles which evolved with certain important rhythms and structural accents and instruments for helping the dancers. As with everything, they evolve over time. Youtube can help you gain some insight into playing techniques, but distinguishing a original Mambo from a later Salsa by ear is invaluable.
 

chillybase

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Thanks for all the great advice. I'm going to order some bongos soon and then add on from there.
 

cworrick

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Keep your eyes open on your local craigslist for an affordable set of congas. They pop up from time to time. That's where I found mine.

As for learning Latin instruments:

Watch and listen to EVERYTHING. Anymore there is no set "right" way to play anything - as is exemplified in your video above. If you hear someone that sparks an idea in you, find out who that person is and look them up online and see what videos are available of them playing. There are many more players out there now than were out there 10-20 years ago.
Yes, there are traditional patterns and ways to get certain sounds out of an instrument that should be learned, but many of those have been greatly expanded upon over time by different players.
Different people, different cultures, and different backgrounds all go into how an instrument is played.
 

sternerp

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These two books are great for learning how to play the various percussion instruments:

The Essence of Afro-Cuban Percussion & Drum Set: Includes the Rhythm Section Parts for Bass, Piano, Guitar, Horns & Strings, Book & Online Audio Paperback –by Ed Uribe

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The Essence of Brazilian Percussion & Drum Set:
Book & CD – by Ed Uribe

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