Learning Vibes or Piano?

wolfereeno

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Vibes or Piano? I'm interested in learning both actually. I can read drumcharts but I don't read staff very well.

I'm mostly interested in being able to learn common cords and scales to be able to improvise. Blues in in any key type stuff and following chord charts. I also want to compose more, but that's usually just piecing together stuff on a daw with midi.

I have a midi keyboard and also a malletkat. I play around with irealpro and try to find my way around different progressions and improvise on my malletkat. Then I might change keys to throw myself off and find the scale again. I have an intuition for it but it's still largely hit or miss.

So I'm thinking I should just commit to some kind of tried and true lesson plan w a teacher or courseware and just try it for a while. But I really hated piano lessons as a kid - was always looking for shortcuts and ultimately didn't learn mess. I probably haven't matured that much in 50 years but I did stick with drum lessons for years after I quit piano and still have good practice skills when I have time.

Any suggestions?!
 

Matched Gripper

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Vibes or Piano? I'm interested in learning both actually. I can read drumcharts but I don't read staff very well.

I'm mostly interested in being able to learn common cords and scales to be able to improvise. Blues in in any key type stuff and following chord charts. I also want to compose more, but that's usually just piecing together stuff on a daw with midi.

I have a midi keyboard and also a malletkat. I play around with irealpro and try to find my way around different progressions and improvise on my malletkat. Then I might change keys to throw myself off and find the scale again. I have an intuition for it but it's still largely hit or miss.

So I'm thinking I should just commit to some kind of tried and true lesson plan w a teacher or courseware and just try it for a while. But I really hated piano lessons as a kid - was always looking for shortcuts and ultimately didn't learn mess. I probably haven't matured that much in 50 years but I did stick with drum lessons for years after I quit piano and still have good practice skills when I have time.

Any suggestions?!
The most efficient approach is to find a qualified teacher who is on board with your goals. Make it clear what you want and confirm that the prospective teacher(s) is willing and able to teach what you want to learn. You may have to try a few teachers before finding what you are looking for. You may want lessons from more than one teacher.
 

multijd

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Take vibraphone lessons and if/when you want to create more complex textures, richer chords, counterpoint then you can try piano again. Vibes are a great entry because it can be melodic fundamentally harmonic with only two mallets. Four gives you richer harmonies but still very limited. The limitation produces additional benefits. Plus you always have the unique timbre of the instrument. Good luck!
 

Deafmoon

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I studied Piano for 1 year just to understand the very basics. I studied Vibes with Neal Boyer who played on Yuseef Lateef’s Gentle Giant for another year and Marimba and Xylophone for 2 years. I enjoyed all of it, especially percussion ensemble. But after college I was only desiring the drums and move away from keyboard percussion. I’ve played Marimba many times since then and glad I can at least move through scales on the keyboard. All good.
 

FlowTom

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I played vibes in a band some years back.
I prefer piano for the flexibility and general music study potential. And also for its greater range.
Vibes are limited in a timbral sense, in that a lot of harmonies do not sound good on it, especially dense dissonant ones.
One of Gary Burton's great achievements was to develop a playing style that was harmonically complex but highlighted the instrument's built in preference for more consonant sounds.
Which is why players like Goodrick and Metheny became such fruitful musical companions.
Also, piano gives you more potential for expressive dynamics.
Especially in the low end. Cal Tjader hitting low notes on vibes with those hard mallets has jarred my ears from day one. There's almost no audible fundamental. Painful.
Back in the pre-Rhodes and Wurlitzer days, people would hire a guitar or vibes player because so many club and studio pianos were awful.
But those days are long gone. Acoustic pianos are generally well miked and kept in better condition and electric stage pianos are highly versatile and portable.
 

dcrigger

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Your second paragraph in its entirely spells out learning piano over vibes. With those goals in mind - I wouldn't give learning the vibes even a momentary glance.
 

James Walker

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Piano.

A drummer who learns to play the piano will be able to function fairly easily on the vibes. Same shapes and patterns, as the bars on a vibraphone are laid out in the very same arrangement as the keys on a piano, and the vibraphone is a far more intuitive instrument to play and learn than the piano.
 


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