Let's talk about pedals!

T-Dub

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anyone interested in this oldbastard ?
I have that same pedal and the matching hi-hat stand. Gigged both of them in the 70's and 80's. I liked the strap drive. I still use the hi-hat... been in service for 40 years!
 

KarnaKarma

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My favorite pedal is the Tama Pro Beat Strap Drive from the 80's, and since I bought it I try to always play barefoot! I don't know how but it's the only pedal where i can truly feel all that lovely low-end vibration on my feet, maybe due to the construction and/or the material of the strap (it's very shaky but i love it). It's pretty unforgiving and difficult to control but it's worth the effort.

Bought and tried other pedals even the Jojo Mayer pedal but kept coming back to the trusty 30 years old Tama.
 

JohnnyVibesAZ

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The owner of the local drum shop placed all of his top-of-the-line pedals for sale, all in a row. All the major brands were there. Their beaters would hit a carpeted wall, which was a neat idea. After going down the long row, my favorite ended up being an Axis pedal.
 

itsjjp

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Ah yes, the venerable Tama Camco! My first pro pedal and one I played for years and years without a lick of trouble and it did everything I asked of it. I'm 6' tall and size 11 or 11.5 shoe, and always played in socks. I'd curl my toes over the toe stop a lot of the time. I shaved the toe stop off, and that helped. Retired it to my practice kit and brought it as a backup to shows while I played my DW 5000. That pedal was easier on my foot, but not as fast, no matter the setup or approach. I went to a Tama Speed Cobra a little while back and she's the one. Ample space for my foot, way less taxing to play for a few hours, and as fast as I am, does it all.
 

Jay_M

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All I use is the Yamaha FP-6110A at this point. Cheap, light, reliable, easy to find and simple. A beater pedal to most but my main pedal. I have a few of them and then I have one Premier 252 Direct Drive pedal for quiet heel down stuff because the action on it is perfect for that. I've tried tons of pedals and with a size 13 foot and bootleg technique for doubles and fast strokes, the only other pedals that even worked for me were the Jojo Perfect Balance and the Speed Cobra. The former fell apart on me and the latter was $25 to take on an airplane.
 

Brien B

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I started with a pre ludwig Ghost pedal (that I still have, not sure why, for me it was uncomfortable to play).
For decades after I used the Tama Camco Pedal
I recently tried a dw 5000 accelerator which was nice, but shortly after buying it I found and bought the Percussion Kinetics Vector Pedal.
Of all the pedals over the years I have tried it is my absolute favorite.
It's smooth and responsive, plus it has the added benefit of adjusting the angling of the foot board to the bass drum which allows for sitting facing forward with a very comfortable feel in the kit with minimum reaching/twisting.
It brings the hihat forward and gives better access to all my drums and cymbals on my right side as well


Vector.jpg .
It also has given me more control, as in the past I would play with my foot angled over the footboard which didn't allow me the access to using the entire footboard for rebounds etc.
 

gwbasley

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I've been playing a Gen 2 Swiv-o for over 50 years and have never found anything better and more versatile. The quick connect bracket can be an issue, but I have made it a point to buy them whenever I see one. They usually come along with a "parts pedal" and, after accumulating a small collection of them , I began build Resto- Mod versions with a flat base, new bearings, and a de-burr and polish job.

Gen 3:
IMG_0872.JPG


Gen 2
Swiv-o 2nd Gen pedal.jpg


I know what you are thinking...the Gen 2 bracket won't work on the Gen 3 and visa-versa. So I only use the Gen 2 brackets and then I modified the base of the Gen 3 pedal so they are compatible.

Another mod is the Gibraltar spring which is very smooth but only for heel down players.
 

kevmill70

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That Camco design seems like it was copied by Pearl/Tama/DW in almost every pedal they have made since. I can't tell if that is an offset cam under the chain, but it doesn't matter, because all of the bigger manufacturers did offest cams as an option, also. Imitation is the highest form of flattery.
 

Elvis

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The owner of the local drum shop placed all of his top-of-the-line pedals for sale, all in a row. All the major brands were there. Their beaters would hit a carpeted wall, which was a neat idea. After going down the long row, my favorite ended up being an Axis pedal.
That idea of display is getting to be the norm at most music stores.
My local Ted Brown has the same setup.
 

Elvis

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That Camco design seems like it was copied by Pearl/Tama/DW in almost every pedal they have made since. I can't tell if that is an offset cam under the chain, but it doesn't matter, because all of the bigger manufacturers did offest cams as an option, also. Imitation is the highest form of flattery.
All strap driven pedals, including the Camco / Gretsch pedal can trace their ancestry to the Martin Fleetfoot.

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1605887718766.png
 

Renno

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I like cheap yamaha chain pedals, DW5000 with strap and recently I've been completely converted to the Tama Dyna-sync which is perfect.

Do any of them make me play faster ? I don't think so.

Speed is in your feet but some pedals do feel better than others to the individual.
Also speed is no longer that important to me. If I can do reasonably fast doubles that's all I need really.
Confidence and accuracy of note are more important than speed.
Yes, cheap can be good. I have a Pacific chain pedal that's built like a house and offers all the features I need. I'm going to try a different type of beater and change the weighting. The beater I have is the standard reversable type, felt one side and rubber the other. But it does a good job for very reasonable cost.
 

Monday317

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My first pedal was a Pearl P-120 chain drive. Had it for a long time, played with the cams, no complaints. Sadly lost a bunch of my stuff in a storage locker theft.

I bought an old WFL Speed-King on eBay with all the usual issues a few years back. Had to work on it with gasoline to debunk everything, and found the bearings and cams were beyond use.

Decided to do a full-bore upgrade this year and got new bearing, cams, pistons, seal caps and even a footboard. I stripped the uprights and footboard base, primed, sealed and enameled with Rustoleum Dark Bronze Hammered finish and that looks awesome!

Being OCD, I sent all the internals except the bearings to a local cryogenic treatment company to make the bits more resistant to wear. I’m also making a rock plate for the thing and replacing the foot plate bearings. The drive strap will ride on ABS rods as well. Stay tuned! I’ll send some Before And After pix of Speed King v3.0 when I get the whole thing done.

In the interim, I bought a Gibraltar 6711D pedal that really fills my bill. They now offer a direct-drive version of their primo G-Class pedal though I wouldn't replace mine now.

However it has occurred to me the 6711's drive could be fitted to the Speed-King uprights, so one could independently adjust their beater and board angles on the Speed-King meh heh, heh, heh. v4.0, anyone..?
 

MrYikes

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What attributes are important for your most liked bass drum pedal? Type of bearings, number of bearings, radius of strap (or chain or link), type of footboard, type of hinges,,etc.?
 

Jack Means

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View attachment 470852

...I played on a CB-700 kit in the mid 80's, which included one of their bass drum pedals. I never gave it much thought, until the bass player in a band I was in complained about the squeak emitted from that pedal and how it threw his timing off.
I found a Ghost pedal for $40 but didn't like it. Too floppy. Wouldn't stick to my foot, but it was built like a tank and operated noticeably smoother than the CB pedal.
Traded it, + some cash, for a Camco by Tama chain drive a guy was selling at a little music store up in North Seattle.
Played it for one day and I WAS SOLD!
It would give me the tension I required to play what I needed to play, it didn't squeak and the action was very smooth.
What more could anyone want.
However, a couple of years later, I sold off the whole kit and quit music for almost 10 years.
During that time, a friend literally begged me to play in his band, even though I wasn't really all that interested anymore.
In the end, I thought it might be fun to revisit the good ol' days, so I capitulated and joined his band.
Had to get another kit, so I pieced something together for cheap at a local music store, but remembered the Camco by Tama pedal and picked it up new at another shop.
Even though I didn't stick with my friend's band for too long, I kept that kit until the late 90's but still have the pedal to this day.
After 30+ years, its the single piece of drum equipment I've owned the longest.

Elvis
Nice story!
View attachment 470852

...I played on a CB-700 kit in the mid 80's, which included one of their bass drum pedals. I never gave it much thought, until the bass player in a band I was in complained about the squeak emitted from that pedal and how it threw his timing off.
I found a Ghost pedal for $40 but didn't like it. Too floppy. Wouldn't stick to my foot, but it was built like a tank and operated noticeably smoother than the CB pedal.
Traded it, + some cash, for a Camco by Tama chain drive a guy was selling at a little music store up in North Seattle.
Played it for one day and I WAS SOLD!
It would give me the tension I required to play what I needed to play, it didn't squeak and the action was very smooth.
What more could anyone want.
However, a couple of years later, I sold off the whole kit and quit music for almost 10 years.
During that time, a friend literally begged me to play in his band, even though I wasn't really all that interested anymore.
In the end, I thought it might be fun to revisit the good ol' days, so I capitulated and joined his band.
Had to get another kit, so I pieced something together for cheap at a local music store, but remembered the Camco by Tama pedal and picked it up new at another shop.
Even though I didn't stick with my friend's band for too long, I kept that kit until the late 90's but still have the pedal to this day.
After 30+ years, its the single piece of drum equipment I've owned the longest.

Elvis
Mapex Falcon’s mostly.
Love the Falcon!
 


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