Let's talk about pedals!

cobaltspike

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View attachment 470852

...I played on a CB-700 kit in the mid 80's, which included one of their bass drum pedals. I never gave it much thought, until the bass player in a band I was in complained about the squeak emitted from that pedal and how it threw his timing off.
I found a Ghost pedal for $40 but didn't like it. Too floppy. Wouldn't stick to my foot, but it was built like a tank and operated noticeably smoother than the CB pedal.
Traded it, + some cash, for a Camco by Tama chain drive a guy was selling at a little music store up in North Seattle.
Played it for one day and I WAS SOLD!
It would give me the tension I required to play what I needed to play, it didn't squeak and the action was very smooth.
What more could anyone want.
However, a couple of years later, I sold off the whole kit and quit music for almost 10 years.
During that time, a friend literally begged me to play in his band, even though I wasn't really all that interested anymore.
In the end, I thought it might be fun to revisit the good ol' days, so I capitulated and joined his band.
Had to get another kit, so I pieced something together for cheap at a local music store, but remembered the Camco by Tama pedal and picked it up new at another shop.
Even though I didn't stick with my friend's band for too long, I kept that kit until the late 90's but still have the pedal to this day.
After 30+ years, its the single piece of drum equipment I've owned the longest.

Elvis
North Seattle, The Drum Key?
 

marc3k

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I have an Iron Cobra 900R and even though there are many (maybe too many) possibilites to adjust it, I'm not too happy with it. I played on my buddy's kit with his basic yamaha pedal, and this was just perfect. I never managed to set up my Iron Cobra to feel like his basic yamaha. Maybe it's the bass drum head or tension or something else...

For my second kit a bought an Iron Cobra 200, which is more basic and does not allow to adjust so many things. I cannot say that I'm much happier with this one than with the 900R.

Maybe my feet are the issue, as others have mentioned here before...
 

Philip Acinapuro

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I have an Iron Cobra 900R and even though there are many (maybe too many) possibilites to adjust it, I'm not too happy with it. I played on my buddy's kit with his basic yamaha pedal, and this was just perfect. I never managed to set up my Iron Cobra to feel like his basic yamaha. Maybe it's the bass drum head or tension or something else...

For my second kit a bought an Iron Cobra 200, which is more basic and does not allow to adjust so many things. I cannot say that I'm much happier with this one than with the 900R.

Maybe my feet are the issue, as others have mentioned here before...
I've had a similar experience actually. The basic Yamaha pedals my college band department has blew me away, and I might like them more than my DW 5000. With the Yamaha, I can almost do everything I can do on my speed king (maybe everything if I practiced more with it). I think it has to do with a light footboard and a linear cam.
 

Elvis

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North Seattle, The Drum Key?
Whatever that little music store was called that was in the Town Centre Mall in Mountlake Terrace (I'm talking about the old mall, not the one that's there now).
Apologies for the misdirection, I just figured it was easier for the non-locals to visualize "North Seattle" than "Mountlake Terrace".
Is The Drum Key still around? I thought it closed down years ago?

Elvis
 

Elvis

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I have an Iron Cobra 900R and even though there are many (maybe too many) possibilites to adjust it, I'm not too happy with it. I played on my buddy's kit with his basic yamaha pedal, and this was just perfect. I never managed to set up my Iron Cobra to feel like his basic yamaha. Maybe it's the bass drum head or tension or something else...

For my second kit a bought an Iron Cobra 200, which is more basic and does not allow to adjust so many things. I cannot say that I'm much happier with this one than with the 900R.

Maybe my feet are the issue, as others have mentioned here before...
More spring tension maybe?
I did that years ago and it helped me immensely.
Really crank it up. It should be a little difficult to play at first, but if you stick with it, you will acclimate.
It really sticks the board to your foot and allows you to do all kinds of beats.

Elvis
 

marc3k

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More spring tension maybe?
I did that years ago and it helped me immensely.
Really crank it up. It should be a little difficult to play at first, but if you stick with it, you will acclimate.
It really sticks the board to your foot and allows you to do all kinds of beats.

Elvis
I'm setting my pedals to the lowest spring tension possible, because I think it should move without much effort. Maybe I should try to go the other way?
Today I tried to analyze what I could improve and moved the bass drum a little closer and changed the angle of the pedal.

Elvis, do you play heel down or up with this spring setting?
 

Elvis

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Heel up.
If you prefer heel down, you won't need quite as much spring tension, but the feel should still be as I described it.
As I stated before, you will eventually acclimate, so the effortlessness of movement will come back, but the board will be glued to your foot, so every little movement of your foot will be transferred to your bass drum.


Elvis
 
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Recefyce

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Hi everyone,
What kind of aluminium should I use to make a kick pedal board?
Thickness?
 

kzac

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I have owned literally dozens of bass drum pedals in my career.
Some comments about those pedals
1- Ludwig Speed king .. Makes a lot of clicking noise (metal strap) and the beater will get hung in your pant leg ... especially if your wearing bell bottoms (it was the 1970s)
2- Pearl P100 and Yamaha FP 7210 are two of the best all around pedals made ... especially for gigging, They fold away into you gig bag nicely and they are durable and reliable.
3- People talk about the iron cobra being an excellent pedal, I have owned several and still have one on a practice kit. Its, OK .. but not my favorite. Seems a little slow on response and feedback. I think sluggish would be an appropriate definition.
4- I have a Sonor pedal they don't make any longer ... think its a 300 series... its my go to pedal for studio work.... its mounted on a solid base so its not the best choice for gigging.. but its the most responsive pedal I have ever used.
5- I have had literally dozens of other pedals, most were good pedals. Entry level pedals today are far better than some of the best pedals available in the 70s and 80s because their manufacturing techniques are dialed in and repetitive. Ball bearing pedals were only found on high end pedals in the early days, today they are part of just about any pedal one can purchase....

I have played DW pedals, don't own any but don't recall them being so outstanding that I pursued acquiring one permanently. I have no issues with the Mapex pedals I have owned over the years. but didn't consider them outstanding either. I went all in to purchase a Ghost pedal .... hated it... sold it a few days later. Most pedals today are made by a few factories in China and branded under different drum manufacturers names. Its fairly simple to spot them of one simply looks. I don't think any of the drum manufacturers today make their own pedals, I think they are all made in China. I find pedals with a solid base plate to be superior to fold up pedals, however base plate pedals are difficult to knock down and store if your gigging. I have also owned many Yamaha pedals and liked all of them.

The only pedals I would steer clear of would be the stamped metal jobies, they tend to be the most incapable and unreliable pedals made.

I think that covers the entire of my pedalogoly
 

Elvis

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Another great little "entry level" pedal was the Premier 204.
When I worked at the local music store, we were a Premier dealer and that pedal came with all the Cabria and XPK kits we sold.
Smooth, responsive and I think they were about $100, new.
Great little pedal you never hear about anymore.
If you run across one and need a pedal, you could definitely do worse.

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Elvis
 

NobleCooleyNut

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I just watched the (inventor) Bob Gatzen video on the BOA. Very interesting pedal indeed, using the flexibility of the footboard to propel and repel the beater.

For anyone wondering about how it works, here’s the video.The BOA sure has a lot of adjustments on it.

It appears to be discontinued. I’d like to dig one up someday though.

I got to play a BOA pedal a few times at local shops and the light it was a brilliant idea . It was a VERY smooth pedal .
 

Renno

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Yes, cheap can be good. I have a Pacific chain pedal that's built like a house and offers all the feature es I need. I'm going to try a different type of beater and change the weighting. The beater I have is the standard reversable type, felt one side and rubber the other. But it does a good job for
very reasonable cost.
I had to laugh when I first bought a Led Zep album on CD and you could hear John Bonhams bass pedal squeaking. You couldn't hear it on vinyl.
 

Talktotommy

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I have a Pearl P-950, which I think is a bit of a rarity. As far as I can tell, it was only produced for a couple years (around 1989-90). It has two features that I have not seen on any other pedals. First, the screw for the hoop clamp is at the top of the pedal frame, so it is incredibly easy to access. Second, the angle of the spring is adjustable, which controls when the spring kicks in. For instance, when the bottom of the spring is angled forward (toward the head), you feel the tension as soon as you start pressing the pedal down. And if the bottom of the spring is angled backward (toward the foot board), you don't start to feel the tension until the beater is close to the head.
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View attachment 471247
I have 5 of these-all I ever use and yes pretty rare.
Seeing the picture of the DW5000 the design looks very similar.
The key as you said is the angle adjustment on the spring.
 

Elvis

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I had to laugh when I first bought a Led Zep album on CD and you could hear John Bonhams bass pedal squeaking. You couldn't hear it on vinyl.
...and now you know why they're called Squeak Kings. :-D

Elvis
 

Lazmo

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I’ve been using two Pearl P101 doubles, that I bought off one of my drum teachers (nearly 20 years ago) when he switched endorsement to Tama. They have been great. I would say that they absolutely are untouched out of the box. I’ve never adjusted them and I’m absolutely sure my teach wouldn’t have either, he’s a fantastic drummer, but not gear technical at all. The pedals are smooth, silent, reliable... certainly as good as me. If I can’t play it, it is me, not the pedals.

But my two new favourite pedals are about tone.

At bedroom levels... the Dumbler kills.

At playing with a drummer levels... the Tube Squasher is the one.

They are pedals... right

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