Light-weight Hardware

Guzowskip

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Hi,
I am looking for a new set of light-weight hardware. The key here for me is STABILITY. My drums are in an area of some traffic including big rowdy dogs and kids. I am cool with flush base hardware if it is stable: I mean someone bumping into it isn't going to topple it. The stuff I remember from the '70s would not do the trick. Hi-hat must be three leg and care nothing about double pedals. I plan to use a snare stand to hold the 12" tom. Cymbal stands won't be asked to handle anything other than cymbals and maybe a cowbell or something like that. There are all kinds of new options out in last few years. I am visually impaired and can't tell from pics what stuff looks like. I assume that "tripod" and "single-braced" mean NOT flush based. Again, stability is most important thing here, but I also don't want stuff that looks like it belongs to an oil rig. Also looking for new kick pedal and wanting something light-weight there as well. Love the old CAMCO pedals from the '70s and the early DW 5000 pedals. No chance for me to get to a store and shake and rattle the stuff for myself. Have no brand preference as long as it won't tip over in a breeze.
DaveDrums....

I too got tired of hauling heavy hardware around for short, one-time gigs so was looking for a lighter option.

A couple of years ago, my drummer buddy in Albuquerque (owns his own drum company) and I mused about designing a hardware line with carbon fiber tubes/legs much like modern racing bicycles. While we were working on the idea Yamaha released their Crosstown Advanced Lightweight Hardware Pack.

I bought the Crosstown Pack last year and it is really nice. I play a 4-piece with only one cymbal so it is very nice to have such a sturdy yet lightweight hardware set to carry out on the kinds of gigs I play. It is well made and very stable. I use a JoJo Mayer pedal which is very light and fits easily in the Yamaha Crosstown Hardware bag.... Simple, light, and nice. QED.

Paul in NW FL
 

StatesboroBlue

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I've used Ludwig flat based stands without issue. They are very nice. Mine may be 20 years old, and you know how designs can change, so check them out first...

One thing to consider about flat-base stands is it is best if the flat base is not totally flat. These Ludwigs will set up flat, but you can go beyond the point of flatness and create a bit of a tripod. This is important because as a tripod the legs don't get in the way of other stands. It's much more flexible that way. I would steer clear of a flat stand that only opens into a flat plane. These are a PITA.

Later I was interested in even less weight in my hardware bag and so I found DW's flat based stand with aluminum legs. This one has a smaller footprint than the Ludwigs -- so a bit less stable -- but it has held up well and done a good job too. It also extends past the flat point, which again is ideal!

Then Yamaha came out with a set of hardware stands and took it to a next level. These aren't flat based, but they are light. They are made mostly of aluminum whereas the DW's only had aluminum legs. Good product. Here's a link. https://usa.yamaha.com/products/musical_instruments/drums/ac_drums/hardware/hw3/index.html

My only problem with the Yamahas is that I am spoiled with my current snare stand which has a 360 degree tilter (Tama made of steel). The Yamaha has only the tooth style tilter, so it's not as flexible, but still good quality. Also, the aluminum hi-hat stand is very light, but the spring is not adjustble. It's all very lightweight though and the lack of a spring on the hi-hat has not been an issue.
I opted for the Tama stuff. We will see. They are due in tomorrow. Drums arrived yesterday, and I woefully over estimated the footprint of this kit. Methinks these Tama stands will work just fine. I can tuck this kit a bit more out of the way than I had expected. Already wishing I had had drilled the kick for mounts though.
 

Radio King

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Best, stable, lightweight hi hat--Tama Classic flat base. I use 15" hi hats. NO sway, or bounce in the stand.
Comfortable and extremely stable.
Karl, do you happen to know if the leg span of the Tama Classic HH stand is shorter than DW's original flat-base DWCP6500 HH stand? I ask because while I love the sturdiness and playability of the DW, the legs extend out so far that it makes positioning my cymbal stand difficult. I'd love to find a flat-base HH stand that's comparable to the DW, but uses less leg real estate.

dwcp6500-med.jpg
 
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pgm554

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Now you're talking. I don't need bassplates nor an infinitely adjustable pedal. I've tried DW, Tama and Pearl high end stuff, and they are all great. Just going back to my roots here.
The Pearl P530 @$50 bucks ain't bad.
 

cruddola

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Are you going to gig with your kit? Why the insistence on light weight hardware? If it's not going to be moved why not go with heavy gear?

As for pedals, I've been using DW5000 double pedals for 20 years and like them well enough to have three. They're also ubiquitous in the used market, so you can usually find one pretty cheap.
I believe he needs to be able to run like hell IF those dogs do get out and heavy metal will slow him down!
 

David M Scott

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Hi,
I am looking for a new set of light-weight hardware. The key here for me is STABILITY. My drums are in an area of some traffic including big rowdy dogs and kids. I am cool with flush base hardware if it is stable: I mean someone bumping into it isn't going to topple it. The stuff I remember from the '70s would not do the trick. Hi-hat must be three leg and care nothing about double pedals. I plan to use a snare stand to hold the 12" tom. Cymbal stands won't be asked to handle anything other than cymbals and maybe a cowbell or something like that. There are all kinds of new options out in last few years. I am visually impaired and can't tell from pics what stuff looks like. I assume that "tripod" and "single-braced" mean NOT flush based. Again, stability is most important thing here, but I also don't want stuff that looks like it belongs to an oil rig. Also looking for new kick pedal and wanting something light-weight there as well. Love the old CAMCO pedals from the '70s and the early DW 5000 pedals. No chance for me to get to a store and shake and rattle the stuff for myself. Have no brand preference as long as it won't tip over in a breeze.
A couple of years back I decided to switch to lightweight hardware and chose the Yamaha Cross Town Aluminum over other brands. It is fabulously light, the hi hat can be picked up with 2 fingers, but being aircraft grade aluminum it's very strong. Note the pics.. I have a 10in Sonor tom mounted off a cymbal stand plus a 18in medium heavy ride cymbal on top. The tom is typical Sonor built, 6 ply Poplar shell and heavy lugs.
I have also mounted a 20in
Sabian AAX medium ride with no stability problems. Note the legs of the stand are a U shape and quite substantial. The whole hardware kit consists of the hi hat, 2 cymbal stands and a snare basket. They each fold up to 16in in length, go into cloth sleeves and into a great carry bag and the whole thing weighs about 22lbs. And.. the travel bag is very sturdy and can easily carry my Iron Cobra kick pedal and cow bell mounted on its small chrome 36in stand.
 

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ondrums

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Hi,
I am looking for a new set of light-weight hardware. The key here for me is STABILITY. My drums are in an area of some traffic including big rowdy dogs and kids. I am cool with flush base hardware if it is stable: I mean someone bumping into it isn't going to topple it. The stuff I remember from the '70s would not do the trick. Hi-hat must be three leg and care nothing about double pedals. I plan to use a snare stand to hold the 12" tom. Cymbal stands won't be asked to handle anything other than cymbals and maybe a cowbell or something like that. There are all kinds of new options out in last few years. I am visually impaired and can't tell from pics what stuff looks like. I assume that "tripod" and "single-braced" mean NOT flush based. Again, stability is most important thing here, but I also don't want stuff that looks like it belongs to an oil rig. Also looking for new kick pedal and wanting something light-weight there as well. Love the old CAMCO pedals from the '70s and the early DW 5000 pedals. No chance for me to get to a store and shake and rattle the stuff for myself. Have no brand preference as long as it won't tip over in a breeze.
Yamaha single braced hardware is lightweight and sturdy; the new Ludwig Speed King bass pedal is very lightweight and very functional;
 

StatesboroBlue

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You really need to take a look at the new Rogers USA hardware.
I did. Almost pulled the trigger on the hi-hat. I may still if the Tama Classics isn't to my liking. Also looked at their kick pedal. Again, if Tama stuff doesn't work out ....

What I really want now is a Dyna-Sonic snare. God, all I need is another snare drum.
 

David M Scott

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You really need to take a look at the new Rogers USA hardware.
I looked seriously at it but went with Yamaha Crosstown as lighter, the U shaped legs are as strong as double braced which the Rogers isn't and each piece folds down to 16in in length, goes into a cloth sleeve and the h.d. carry bag is included that can take my Iron Cobra kick and a chrome stand and cowbell. It was basically same price as the Rogers here in Canada plus the Yamaha included the bag. I realize those purists want to see chrome not anodized aluminum but at gigs i've had drummers come up to me who really liked the look.
As regards stability I've attached a pic of a Crosstown cymbal stand carrying a 6lb 10in Sonor tom, Gibralter aluminum attachment for same plus sn 18in medium heavy ride that uses 2 - 6in Gibralter aluminum cymbal stackers in lieu of a heavy chrome boom.
 

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karlcrafton

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Karl, do you happen to know if the leg span of the Tama Classic HH stand is shorter than DW's original flat-base DWCP6500 HH stand? I ask because while I love the sturdiness and playability of the DW, the legs extend out so far that it makes positioning my cymbal stand difficult. I'd love to find a flat-base HH stand that's comparable to the DW, but uses less leg real estate.

View attachment 496502
Yes, it is a shorter leg span than the DW 6000. It also has a more "normal" spring feel than DW's "floating" spring.
There is a nice adjustment for the footboard angle that is very secure also.
Really nice feeling and sturdy hat stand for a great price.
This whole line is REALLY stable.

I had issues with the DW6000 hat stand having some sway, and I figured out that it was those long feet with the spikes in them.
I changed out the DW rubber feet to the small profile, one position Ludwig Aculite feet, and that made it 100% more sturdy--and TBH, useable for me.
 
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FWIW, I'll recount my experience of trying flush-based stands fairly recently.

Back in the 80s and 90s I would have nothing less than the heaviest double-braced hardware, but that eventually changed once I realised I didn't actually need the extra weight - for reliability or in my hardware cases! Over the last 20 years I started slimming down the body-mass of steel in my stands and finally settled with the Gibraltar 5000 series which I believe, are about the lightest double-braced stands available with the strength and versatility I need for an ex-pro regular gigging/rehearsal schedule.

I was very tempted to try flush-braced as I find the styling aesthetically pleasing (unlike in my teen years when I harboured an unhealthy desire for Tama Titan stands). A friend lent me his spare set of Pearl flush-braced stands and everything was looking wonderful until I mounted my cymbals. My Ride sits about mid-chest level and my Crashes are all sitting at eye level, so nothing is low-slung. My Ride is a 22" and all my Crashes are 20" and unfortunately, flush-braced stands do not offer the stability needed for my combo of cymbal heights and diameters. The physics just doesn't allow it.

Furthermore, the Boom on the stand for the Ride was waaay too short to balance and was a complete non-starter. As it happens, I did see a pic a while back of Stanton Moore performing with his Ride resting on his Bass Drum as the flush-braced Boom stand had decided to give in to the natural pull of gravity. So whilst drummers don't need the extra weight in their stands, they undoubtedly need the wider spread of modern tripod legs.

So as of 2021 (no gigs etc) I am sticking with the light but stable Gibraltar 5000 series. I would prefer a single-braced option, but it seems manufacturers associate single-braced tripod stands with an excuse to remove features (which is why I skipped the 4000 series).
 

StatesboroBlue

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... It seems manufacturers associate single-braced tripod stands with an excuse to remove features (which is why I skipped the 4000 series).
I'd be curious to know what features you thinkare missing. I can see that with hi-hats and bass pedals, but I am not sure what features are necessarily taken away as a product of slimming down a stand.
 

cribbon

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A day late and a dollar short, but anyhoo: around 2005 I decided that a 4-piece kit would suit most of my needs from now until the finish line, so I've basically gone that route, which has included minimal hardware, with everything being as lite as practical because most of my playing is one-nighters in various size venues.

However I had been a big user of racks for many years previously, and they do have their advantages, especially if you're not moving them. If I were looking to have something set up at home that needed to be compact and not easily dislodged or bumped around by errant dogs and/or human life forms, I'd opt for a Yamaha Hex Rack II. I tried one out and it's substantially lighter than a conventional steel rack and makes for a much tighter footprint than a kit with spread-leg tripod stands, plus it doesn't look too ridiculous with a small kit.

YamahaHexRack2-100.JPG
 
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RIDDIM

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I am drawing a distinction between sturdy and stable. In my book those are two different things. Mass can and does contribute to stability, but so do angles and the bredth. I considered racks and rejected those. More than I want or need.

My goal was to get opinions on the light-weight stuff and see if I think it will meet my needs. I am sure the durability and strength (AKA "sturdiness") are sufficient for my needs. Most of this stuff seems to be flush base, and that is where I am unsure of stability. What I remember of flush base stands from the '70s would not work for me. Maybe the stuff has gotten better.
I've had good luck with the Tama lightweight suite.
 

StatesboroBlue

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A day late and a dollar short, but anyhoo: around 2005 I decided that a 4-piece kit would suit most of my needs from now until the finish line, so I've basically gone that route, which has included minimal hardware, with everything being as lite as practical because most of my playing is one-nighters in various size venues.

However I had been a big user of racks for many years previously, and they do have their advantages, especially if you're not moving them. If I were looking to have something set up at home that needed to be compact and not easily dislodged or bumped around by errant dogs and/or human life forms, I'd opt for a Yamaha Hex Rack II. I tried one out and it's substantially lighter than a conventional steel rack and makes for a much tighter footprint than a kit with spread-leg tripod stands, plus it doesn't look too ridiculous with a small kit.

View attachment 496710
Racks would make a lot of sense for someone like me. The less variables to deal with in terms of positioning, the better. In that sense, racks would seem a no-brainer. Maybe I will look at that down the road. This Tama stuff I cbought wasn't that expensive, so if I end up essentially renting it and selling it down the road, not that big a deal. Hopefully, this will work for now. It will take some time for me to acclimate to this setup. I'm used to a bigger kit with all hanging toms. I haven't played a kit with a real floor tom in decades. And I am not sure I ever played a 20" kick before. Everything feels totally foreign on this kit. Response and feel is crazy-weird. Dropping sticks is the bane of my existence, and I am losing them all the time right now.
 

IBitePrettyHard

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Racks would make a lot of sense for someone like me. The less variables to deal with in terms of positioning, the better. In that sense, racks would seem a no-brainer. Maybe I will look at that down the road. This Tama stuff I cbought wasn't that expensive, so if I end up essentially renting it and selling it down the road, not that big a deal. Hopefully, this will work for now. It will take some time for me to acclimate to this setup. I'm used to a bigger kit with all hanging toms. I haven't played a kit with a real floor tom in decades. And I am not sure I ever played a 20" kick before. Everything feels totally foreign on this kit. Response and feel is crazy-weird. Dropping sticks is the bane of my existence, and I am losing them all the time right now.
What kit did you just get?
 

StatesboroBlue

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What kit did you just get?
Gretsch Broadkasters in downbeat config. It's been my dream kit since they first reissued them seven or eight years ago. Always thought "if I ever get a new kit ...." Then, when I had the chance to do something, I spent two months looking at everything on the planet. Should have saved myself the time. There were only two real <i>dream</i> kits on my mind: Ludwig Legacy and Gretsch Broadkasters. There are, of course, dozens of <i>vintage</i> kits that are also dream kits.
 

CC Cirillo

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Have to agree here. I have one 700 Series straight stand that I’ve used for probably two decades and I’ve used it hard. Very stable. It’s only a touch heavier than some of the other hardware, but it’s engineering, craftsmanship and material make for a lifelong purchase. And the felts are the same they use on their piano hammers....

Once again, thank you JDA for making a pragmatic suggestion.
 

Stone Wilcoxon

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Now days I mostly use the Tama flat based stands and they are very stable. No one has bumped into them, but I do play heavy at times and they stay put.

I have two Tama flat based stands, a Tama Classic snare stand, a DW Ultralight snare stand for my tom and one of the new Rogers hi hat stands. I fit all of that plus my pedal, mics and cables into a Dewalt tool box.

That's my hardware box too.
 


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