Looking for Software for Drum Notation and Transcription

kenshireen1

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I guess I am looking for 2 different functions.
First I want to be able to write drum notation and charts (other than by hand obviously)
And secondly.. there are times I sit down and play some great stuff but cannot duplicate.. I would like software that would record what I played and if possible transcribe it.

Hope this wasn't too confusing

Thank you
Ken
 

multijd

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The first is easy although depending on the software you use the learning curve may be high. Finale or Sibelius are the industry standard notation software. Maybe there is something simpler? Your second request is much more difficult. I dont know of software that does that.
 

bongomania

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For a free (but still very good) alternative to Finale, try Musescore. Best bet for recording and transcription is to use a DAW to record (Audacity is free and excellent) and then use a separate program to slow the track down to half speed, so you can transcribe it more easily.
 

Tymp2002

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For notation, I've had good luck with iWriteMusic. I have it for iPad - not sure if there is an android or PC version. It has some drum notation features like X noteheads. You can also write 4 parts per staff so it allows you to line up parts like bass drum and cymbals. It's also a lot less expensive then the industry standard stuff. Can export to PDF. Attached an example of a chart I did using iWriteMusic.
 

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rstange1

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Check out Aered for writing drum parts. Covers the basics pretty well and the price is right. Years ago I used Amazing Slow Downer for listening to music at a much slower pace for transcription. Nice thing is it does not alter pitch, just speed. Found both programs very helpful. :)
 

dcrigger

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I guess I am looking for 2 different functions.
First I want to be able to write drum notation and charts (other than by hand obviously)
And secondly.. there are times I sit down and play some great stuff but cannot duplicate.. I would like software that would record what I played and if possible transcribe it.

Hope this wasn't too confusing

Thank you
Ken
Not confusing - but I'm going to suggest something you might not want to hear... :cool:

Your part two - is the part that doesn't really exist.

And that's not a bad thing... because having someone or some virtual things do the transcribing eliminates are huge portion (majority actually) of the value to be learned from the process.

You want to get better at understanding/recognizing what you or others play - then practice transcribing. The short cut of being handed the transcription does absolutely nothing for developing your ears in this way.

The only exercise that will get you better at hearing these things is transcribing... if there was a shortcut, I or others would share it, but they most likely won't, because it doesn't exist.

I'm not saying that some software might not be able to accomplish this to some degree - just that utilizing will actually hinder your development by neglecting the development of this basic and essential skill.

As for notation - for basic transcribing, why? It will look better - but it takes more time, particularly for something for your own use. All of the notation software is great for making stuff look really nice and if you need to do a lot of differently transposed versions - or lots of "work in progress" versions - of whole pieces, I'm talk in about. Not just drum parts.

Actually notation software programs are notoriously bad for writing actual drum charts - but work fine for transcriptions.

But again, why bother - when with a teeny bit of practice, you can just whip out a piece of manuscript paper and scribbled it out yourself - and if you think notation software doesn't come with a learning curve, well that's hardly the case either.

My advice - grab a pad of manuscript paper and a few #1 or #2 pencil and dig in - you will absolutely thank yourself down the road.
 


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