Looking for value help with Ludwig Vintage Set- Tampa Fl

lrod1707

DFO Master
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 12, 2018
Messages
3,839
Reaction score
1,953
Location
Florida
Feel bad for what? I’m sorry I’m not following.
I quoted another member (JDA) That post wasn't for you. We were discussing badges last week and yours looks like mine. I have a new Ludwig Tom that came with a crooked badge from the factory.
 

Myk

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 24, 2019
Messages
120
Reaction score
56
The bass that says pearl, is also Ludwig, it's just the head that says pearl, Ludwig butcher block wrap, and the blue kit below it is a Ludwig Standard kit
 

Grayless17

Active Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2020
Messages
30
Reaction score
13
I quoted another member (JDA) That post wasn't for you. We were discussing badges last week and yours looks like mine. I have a new Ludwig Tom that came with a crooked badge from the factory.
Oh no! That stinks!
 

Grayless17

Active Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2020
Messages
30
Reaction score
13
If someone offered you $2,500.00 for all 3 kits would you take it?
I think we are keeping one set but selling the butcher block and vintage Ludwig. The last set was the one he played the most, so we may hang onto it. But would consider all offered for the 2.
 

jeffintampa

Member
Joined
Jun 22, 2020
Messages
5
Reaction score
2
I’ll have to ask around and see what I come up with. My dad had a lot of contacts but I have yet to find his address book. Which would help me tremendously.
I'm in Tampa, I'm 70, may have known your dad, sorry to hear of his passing. Did he play in any bands around here? Let me know if I can help. Played Ludwigs my whole life.
 

Grayless17

Active Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2020
Messages
30
Reaction score
13
I'm in Tampa, I'm 70, may have known your dad, sorry to hear of his passing. Did he play in any bands around here? Let me know if I can help. Played Ludwigs my whole life.
Hey there! His name was Gib he lived in riverview. He played in a band for a little bit but then was dedicated to doing Led Zeppelin tribute stuff
 

mikesdrums

Drummer
Joined
Apr 1, 2006
Messages
1,387
Reaction score
97
Location
Dallas
You're going to get estimates that are all over the place, partly because vintage drum set values have declined dramatically over the past several years. But here's some info that I think will help:

  • In addition to the obvious things that affect value (age, condition, rarity), there are a few things that are just as important when it comes to drums: size, color, and materials.
    • Size: Drum sizes go in and out of fashion. Yours are traditional sizes, the most common for the period, and luckily back in style today. That helps a lot on the value because it's not just collectors who will be interested but players as well. The sizes of your drums are 9x13 (depth x diameter), 16x16, 14x22, and 5x14 for the snare drum. While the sizes of your set are good, they're also the most common for the period.
    • Color: Some colors are more popular than others. Sparkle finishes like on your drums went completely out of fashion for a while but have come back in a big way since then; however, for vintage drums, blue sparkle is simply not as popular with players as most other sparkle finishes.
    • Materials: There are others here who can pinpoint the exact materials Ludwig was using in 1964, but suffice to say the drums were made with good tone woods. For a 60s Ludwig kit, it won't really matter for the value. Except for the snare. Your snare is usually referred to as the Supraphonic, or just Supra. Around 1963, Ludwig switched from making these shells from brass to aluminum. They look the same because both the brass and aluminum shells were chromed and used the same tension lugs and so forth. One clue is whether the badge has a serial number, because it was about this time that Ludwig also starting putting serial numbers on the drum badges. Your snare drum doesn't have a serial number. That doesn't guarantee that it's a brass shell, but it's a strong clue. If your snare has a brass shell, it's worth three to four times as much as if it has an aluminum one.
  • You can get more money if you split the kit up like this:
    • The three blue drums. These are worth $800 to $1,000. I paid $899 last year for a similar setup, and that was in a more popular color and from a music store. Another local store had a blue sparkle set at the time that they were asking $1,000 for, and it sat on the floor for a year or so.
    • The snare. If it's brass, it's worth $800 to $1,200, although it might take a while to sell. The brass snares aren't better than the aluminum ones, they're just a lot less common. If it's aluminum, it's worth about $300. But I bet it's brass.
    • 14" hi hat cymbals. $150 to $250 for the pair.
    • 18" cymbal. $$75 to $100
    • 20" cymbal. $100 to $150
      • All of these prices are assuming the cymbals are about the same age as the drums. I didn't look up the stamps to date them. But even if they're from the 50s instead of the 60s, the prices are about the same.
    • Stands. Anywhere from $50 to $150 each, depending on the model. There are others here who know more about the particular models that bring better prices.
    • Cases. Less than $100.
  • If you don't split the kit up, just keep in mind that you're limiting your potential buyers to collectors who want a complete 1964 kit as it came from the store. We all want one of those, but the number of people who are prepared to buy one is pretty small.
  • When selling used music gear, remember that there's kind of a sweet spot for pricing, no matter what it is. There are a lot of people who can come up with a few hundred dollars for a good deal, but the pool of people who play drums and also can come up with $4,000 on short notice is pretty small. The closer you can get to $800 or less for each thing or group of things, the more customers you have.
  • Don't split up the three blue drums, though. That would be immoral.
 

Grayless17

Active Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2020
Messages
30
Reaction score
13
You're going to get estimates that are all over the place, partly because vintage drum set values have declined dramatically over the past several years. But here's some info that I think will help:

  • In addition to the obvious things that affect value (age, condition, rarity), there are a few things that are just as important when it comes to drums: size, color, and materials.
    • Size: Drum sizes go in and out of fashion. Yours are traditional sizes, the most common for the period, and luckily back in style today. That helps a lot on the value because it's not just collectors who will be interested but players as well. The sizes of your drums are 9x13 (depth x diameter), 16x16, 14x22, and 5x14 for the snare drum. While the sizes of your set are good, they're also the most common for the period.
    • Color: Some colors are more popular than others. Sparkle finishes like on your drums went completely out of fashion for a while but have come back in a big way since then; however, for vintage drums, blue sparkle is simply not as popular with players as most other sparkle finishes.
    • Materials: There are others here who can pinpoint the exact materials Ludwig was using in 1964, but suffice to say the drums were made with good tone woods. For a 60s Ludwig kit, it won't really matter for the value. Except for the snare. Your snare is usually referred to as the Supraphonic, or just Supra. Around 1963, Ludwig switched from making these shells from brass to aluminum. They look the same because both the brass and aluminum shells were chromed and used the same tension lugs and so forth. One clue is whether the badge has a serial number, because it was about this time that Ludwig also starting putting serial numbers on the drum badges. Your snare drum doesn't have a serial number. That doesn't guarantee that it's a brass shell, but it's a strong clue. If your snare has a brass shell, it's worth three to four times as much as if it has an aluminum one.
  • You can get more money if you split the kit up like this:
    • The three blue drums. These are worth $800 to $1,000. I paid $899 last year for a similar setup, and that was in a more popular color and from a music store. Another local store had a blue sparkle set at the time that they were asking $1,000 for, and it sat on the floor for a year or so.
    • The snare. If it's brass, it's worth $800 to $1,200, although it might take a while to sell. The brass snares aren't better than the aluminum ones, they're just a lot less common. If it's aluminum, it's worth about $300. But I bet it's brass.
    • 14" hi hat cymbals. $150 to $250 for the pair.
    • 18" cymbal. $$75 to $100
    • 20" cymbal. $100 to $150
      • All of these prices are assuming the cymbals are about the same age as the drums. I didn't look up the stamps to date them. But even if they're from the 50s instead of the 60s, the prices are about the same.
    • Stands. Anywhere from $50 to $150 each, depending on the model. There are others here who know more about the particular models that bring better prices.
    • Cases. Less than $100.
  • If you don't split the kit up, just keep in mind that you're limiting your potential buyers to collectors who want a complete 1964 kit as it came from the store. We all want one of those, but the number of people who are prepared to buy one is pretty small.
  • When selling used music gear, remember that there's kind of a sweet spot for pricing, no matter what it is. There are a lot of people who can come up with a few hundred dollars for a good deal, but the pool of people who play drums and also can come up with $4,000 on short notice is pretty small. The closer you can get to $800 or less for each thing or group of things, the more customers you have.
  • Don't split up the three blue drums, though. That would be immoral.
Thank you SO much for your input. The snare drum is brass for sure. The magnet does not stick to the drum itself, but the frame around the top it does stick to.
 

thestorysold

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 27, 2020
Messages
72
Reaction score
49
You're going to get estimates that are all over the place, partly because vintage drum set values have declined dramatically over the past several years. But here's some info that I think will help:
you really think values have declined? I feel like it's the opposite.

here's the sold listings of blue sparkle Ludwigs from Reverb: https://reverb.com/marketplace?query=ludwig blue sparkle set&show_only_sold=true

unfortunately it doesn't show the dates of when they are sold (at least from what I can see), but that should give you a good idea of what you could possibly get for those.
 
  • Like
Reactions: JDA

el_37

Very well Known Member
Joined
May 25, 2009
Messages
1,376
Reaction score
212
Location
NYC
Thank you SO much for your input. The snare drum is brass for sure. The magnet does not stick to the drum itself, but the frame around the top it does stick to.

Magnets don’t stick to aluminum as well- which is the other material they made those snare drums out of.
 

Skins_in_the_game

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2018
Messages
233
Reaction score
250
Location
Boise ID
I had 64 supra in the 86 thousand range and it was not brass. Brass ended in 63 so a snare near 100 thou is going to be aluminum(ludoy)
 

andlours

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2018
Messages
421
Reaction score
309
Location
Denver, CO
Didn't all keystone badge brass supras also have COB hoops? It seems like his hoops are steel.
 

JDA

DFO Star
Silver Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2005
Messages
17,871
Reaction score
6,660
Location
Jeannette, Pa.
Sure is a clean example, even if determined Ludalloy, nary a pit pimple



How rare is that 90% rare huh.
 


Top