Ludwig Classic Maple, Best Drums Ever Made?

LRod1707

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Aquarian makes the prettiest drumheads. You should check out the clear Studio X's.
Thanks for the heads up, I'll check them out for sure. I love Aquarian! If you look at the picture, even my Remo roto's & LP mini timbales have Aquarian, LOL!! I use Super 2 coated for the batters on both toms & floor toms, Hi-frequency coated for the tom resos, Texture coated for the floor tom resos, roto's & mini timbales.
 

coastie

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Looks like a Roger's tom mount. Did Camco not make their own?
Yes, Camco made their own but this particular set originally came from the Eddie Knight drum shop. Most of their Camco drums were ordered virgin and the Rogers Swivo hardware was dealer installed. The Rogers Swivo hardware is so far superior to the Camco stuff that there is no mistaking the reason it was done quite a bit with all makes of drums back then.
 

Alpine

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Sometimes an answer is not simple, it is long and complicated. Here comes another of my ridiculously long posts. My apologies in advance.

Ludwig Classic Maple are great drums, no question.

Best?

I'm never a fan of the word "best", particularly in regards to something as subjective as drums. I prefer the word "Favorite", and even then, I have a lot of favorites. My favorites may not align with anyone else's choices.

In 2019 I decided to order a new set of brand new drums, what could be my last new drum set. (Although that is doubtful.) I looked at all of the usual suspects.

Ludwig Legacy Mahogany and Classic Maple.

Gretsch USA Custom and Broadcaster.

DW Collector's Series, or DW Classics. (I already have a Collector's Series kit that I bought new in 2008.)

Noble & Cooley Horizon series.

INDe, a fresh choice among the established players.

And lastly, Craviotto. In 2010 I played a set of walnut Craviotto drums at Steve Maxwell's NYC store that were just amazing. They have been a benchmark for me ever since.

In order to afford the Craviotto kit I thought that I would probably have to sell the DWs, something that I really didn't want to do.

I found that I preferred the sound of the Ludwig Legacy Mahogany over the Classic Maples.

I also decided that I preferred the Gretsch USA Customs over the Broadcasters.

The Legacy Mahogany and USA Custom kits were the finalists, in the end I went with the Gretsch USA Customs. I had a couple of sets of vintage Gretsch, and I decided that I wanted to continue in that direction.

Does that mean that they are the best, or even my "best"? Well, no, not really. But they were a really good choice. If money was no object and I was not worried about taking a natural finished solid shell walnut kit to every gig, I'd have bought a walnut Craviotto set. In the end I liked the Gretsch USA Custom kit so much that I expanded it into a shell bank last year. I was able to afford the whole shell bank because I spread out the purchase over two years. The ironic part is that for what I ended up spending on a Gretsch USA Custom shell bank, I could have bought the Craviotto Walnut kit. And I would have still had the DW Collector's Series kit to use when I didn't use the Craviottos.

Even more ironic, my band situation changed shortly after I got the Gretsch shell bank. the Gretsch USA Custom kit was really perfect for the two bands that I was in when I ordered them. One was a classic rock and soul cover band, the other was a band that covered pop hits from 1955 until today. The Gretsch kit was perfect for both.

Currently I'm playing in a band that mostly covers 1980s stadium rock. To me my DWs are likely a better fit for my current musical situation. No worries, the Gretsch shell pack isn't going anywhere. Due to the pandemic, this band has yet to play out. So, I could be totally wrong. And who knows what is around the corner?

If I'm able to return to work in 2021 maybe I'll finally start putting away money for a walnut Craviotto kit. Or DW will release the new Slingerland line and totally blow me away. I'm also interested in playing a Craviotto Diamond Series kit. I love the idea of wrapped, ply kit with Craviotto build quality, for a price comparable to Gretsch USA Custom, Ludwig Legacy Mahogany, and Noble & Cooley Horizon series drums.

In other words... I'm fickle.

Best?

I'm not capable of picking a "best".
It will be interesting to see what DW does with Slingerland! Ludwig Classic Maple do sound great, The DW Performance series were a big surprise (in a good way). Which drum companies are making their own shells? That makes a difference imo.
 

Elvis

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It was actually copied by a lot of "MIJ" drums, before the advent of the Japanese drum explosion that occurred in the 80's, so (in a sense) you're probably right.
 

JohnnyVibesAZ

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I put together a set of green sparkle Ludwigs, piece-by-piece, between 1964 and 1966. It was the worst set of drums I ever owned. The hardware was garbage, and I didn't know what wood was underneath that white paint, on the inside of the shells. Many years later, I owned a pair of Ludwig Dresden Timpani. One of them had been dropped before I got them, and one of its rails that held up the bowl, was broken. A friend of mine knew a guy who could weld aluminum, so I had him fix the rail. The welder asked my friend what the rail was from, because he said it was the cheapest grade of aluminum he had ever welded. About that time, I read a pamphlet, "The William F. Ludwig Story", that I got from a local drum shop. Mr. Ludwig, Sr. said nothing about striving for the best quality of his product, but only how he could turn a nickel into a dime. That did it for me and Ludwig. However, The Ludwig Drum Company is not owned by the family anymore, so I am giving them another look.
 
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Slingwig26

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Sometimes an answer is not simple, it is long and complicated. Here comes another of my ridiculously long posts. My apologies in advance.

Ludwig Classic Maple are great drums, no question.

Best?

I'm never a fan of the word "best", particularly in regards to something as subjective as drums. I prefer the word "Favorite", and even then, I have a lot of favorites. My favorites may not align with anyone else's choices.

In 2019 I decided to order a new set of brand new drums, what could be my last new drum set. (Although that is doubtful.) I looked at all of the usual suspects.

Ludwig Legacy Mahogany and Classic Maple.

Gretsch USA Custom and Broadcaster.

DW Collector's Series, or DW Classics. (I already have a Collector's Series kit that I bought new in 2008.)

Noble & Cooley Horizon series.

INDe, a fresh choice among the established players.

And lastly, Craviotto. In 2010 I played a set of walnut Craviotto drums at Steve Maxwell's NYC store that were just amazing. They have been a benchmark for me ever since.

In order to afford the Craviotto kit I thought that I would probably have to sell the DWs, something that I really didn't want to do.

I found that I preferred the sound of the Ludwig Legacy Mahogany over the Classic Maples.

I also decided that I preferred the Gretsch USA Customs over the Broadcasters.

The Legacy Mahogany and USA Custom kits were the finalists, in the end I went with the Gretsch USA Customs. I had a couple of sets of vintage Gretsch, and I decided that I wanted to continue in that direction.

Does that mean that they are the best, or even my "best"? Well, no, not really. But they were a really good choice. If money was no object and I was not worried about taking a natural finished solid shell walnut kit to every gig, I'd have bought a walnut Craviotto set. In the end I liked the Gretsch USA Custom kit so much that I expanded it into a shell bank last year. I was able to afford the whole shell bank because I spread out the purchase over two years. The ironic part is that for what I ended up spending on a Gretsch USA Custom shell bank, I could have bought the Craviotto Walnut kit. And I would have still had the DW Collector's Series kit to use when I didn't use the Craviottos.

Even more ironic, my band situation changed shortly after I got the Gretsch shell bank. the Gretsch USA Custom kit was really perfect for the two bands that I was in when I ordered them. One was a classic rock and soul cover band, the other was a band that covered pop hits from 1955 until today. The Gretsch kit was perfect for both.

Currently I'm playing in a band that mostly covers 1980s stadium rock. To me my DWs are likely a better fit for my current musical situation. No worries, the Gretsch shell pack isn't going anywhere. Due to the pandemic, this band has yet to play out. So, I could be totally wrong. And who knows what is around the corner?

If I'm able to return to work in 2021 maybe I'll finally start putting away money for a walnut Craviotto kit. Or DW will release the new Slingerland line and totally blow me away. I'm also interested in playing a Craviotto Diamond Series kit. I love the idea of wrapped, ply kit with Craviotto build quality, for a price comparable to Gretsch USA Custom, Ludwig Legacy Mahogany, and Noble & Cooley Horizon series drums.

In other words... I'm fickle.

Best?

I'm not capable of picking a "best".
I love them, my favorite of all the "bran spankin new" kits I have bought.
Sound phenominal and priced lower than a lot of competitors in similar class and I have never had a quality issue.
All natural maple finish.

Let the opinions fly!!!!!!!!
 

pan60

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has anyone heard anything as to what DW plans to do with Slingerland?
 


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