Ludwig Neusonic 2021

bpaluzzi

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I _hate_ that they got rid of the unique spurs on those kits and went with the same generic pearl-style spurs that every other cheap kit has.

Boooooo! :)
 

bpaluzzi

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The Elite spurs feel way more stable, an upgrade imo.
I've used both and I'll just say I heartily disagree :) The downside with the Stilettos was that they weren't adjustable (at all), but if the position worked for you (it did for me), they were (by far) the best spurs I've ever used.
 

Cauldronics

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The natural finish looks gorgeous, but I wish there was a 20x16. I just like a longer note.

That might be my next kit with a 16x16 floor tom added to the downbeat configuration.

What was so great about the original spurs? Edit: saw an answer
 

bpaluzzi

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What was so great about the original spurs?
No extraneous parts. It was a solid leg with a bolt running through it as a pivot. It could only in two positions: open, or closed. No height adjustment means no possible way for it to slip. The base casting had notches in it so that the spur itself firmly locked into fully open or fully shut (like the high-end Yamaha). No possible failure points. And it was super sleekly designed.

The lack of adjustability was (understandably) a deal-breaker for some, but if it lined up with where you wanted your kick positioned, it was my platonic ideal spur. I still miss those spurs on every drum I’ve had since selling my Signet kit.
 

Alpine

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I've used both and I'll just say I heartily disagree :) The downside with the Stilettos was that they weren't adjustable (at all), but if the position worked for you (it did for me), they were (by far) the best spurs I've ever used.
Depends on your playing style I suppose, whatever wrks. I like the adjustability of Elite spurs, proven to be tried & true on the higher end Ludwig kits.
 

Alpine

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The natural finish looks gorgeous, but I wish there was a 20x16. I just like a longer note.

That might be my next kit with a 16x16 floor tom added to the downbeat configuration.

What was so great about the original spurs? Edit: saw an answer
A longer note is possible on a 20x14, just listen closer ;-). The original spurs were a cool design (although nonadjustable). The Elite spurs are a lot more versatile in that regard.
 

Cauldronics

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No extraneous parts. It was a solid leg with a bolt running through it as a pivot. It could only in two positions: open, or closed. No height adjustment means no possible way for it to slip. The base casting had notches in it so that the spur itself firmly locked into fully open or fully shut (like the high-end Yamaha). No possible failure points. And it was super sleekly designed.

The lack of adjustability was (understandably) a deal-breaker for some, but if it lined up with where you wanted your kick positioned, it was my platonic ideal spur. I still miss those spurs on every drum I’ve had since selling my Signet kit.
Given that description I’d probably be in the camp of preferring the new spur as I like to try varying setups, bass lifting and bass drum angles... not often, but enough that I’d want the option. Ludwig had to have changed the spur to meet customer demand, I’d think.
 

Cauldronics

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No extraneous parts. It was a solid leg with a bolt running through it as a pivot. It could only in two positions: open, or closed. No height adjustment means no possible way for it to slip. The base casting had notches in it so that the spur itself firmly locked into fully open or fully shut (like the high-end Yamaha). No possible failure points. And it was super sleekly designed.

The lack of adjustability was (understandably) a deal-breaker for some, but if it lined up with where you wanted your kick positioned, it was my platonic ideal spur. I still miss those spurs on every drum I’ve had since selling my Signet kit.
Inquiring minds want to know: have you had a lot of problems with spurs giving out or slipping on other kits?
 

bpaluzzi

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Inquiring minds want to know: have you had a lot of problems with spurs giving out or slipping on other kits?
yup - the lower (adjustable) section coming unstuck (that’s happened to me a ton with the elite-style spurs) during a gig, causing the drum to tilt to one side. Or the general issue with trying to get the two sides to be _exactly_ the same size to start with. This is a big problem with gullwings that don’t come with memory locks, as well.
I want my spurs to do two things: fold up and down easily, and hold my bass drum stable and level. I always mount toms and cymbals on my kick drum, so I need it to be perfectly flat and stable, and consistent from set-up to set-up. For me, the stilettos did that better than anything I’ve ever used.
 

shuffle

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I owned the blk cortex kit,12,16,22.
I love cherry and these shells didnt fail.
Thin shells,responsive- barely touch the toms and they exploded in beautiful musical tones.
They did fail at the spurs,no height adjustment,.
I got an Atlas Arch as well.
Under a grand then.
28664.jpeg
 

Drumceet

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I owned the blk cortex kit,12,16,22.
I love cherry and these shells didnt fail.
Thin shells,responsive- barely touch the toms and they exploded in beautiful musical tones.
They did fail at the spurs,no height adjustment,.
I got an Atlas Arch as well.
Under a grand then. View attachment 481020
How do you like the black cortex? I got a classic maple in black cortex, and I never thought I’d buy a black kit. I have to say I’m loving how classic it looks.
 

hsosdrum

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I had the dealer install the original Pearl version of the Elite spurs when I ordered my Gretsch USA kit in 1984. I gigged with that kit for 5 years and the spurs never failed and put my bass drums (which had toms and cymbals mounted on them) in the exact same positions every setup. And the drums never crept one iota, even when not set up on carpet.

On the Ludwig Classic kit I got in 1990 I decided to go with Ludwig's thick curved retractable spurs. BIG MISTAKE! Those bass drums also have toms and cymbals mounted on them and they always wound up in slightly (or not-so-slightly) different angles. Plus they did not prevent creeping unless set up on carpet. I gigged that kit for 23 years and getting things in their proper positions during setup always took extra time and bother. PHOOEY!

When I ordered my Ludwig Legacy Maples in 2013 I specified the Elite spurs. Once again I have exact-same positioning and freedom from creeping on uncarpeted floors. They just plain do their job.

P.S. The satinwood and blue finishes look really nice, and the Neusonic drums sound great!
 


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