LUDWIG NEW YORKER 1960's

sbarrett1106

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2020
Messages
123
Reaction score
30
Anyone have any experience with these drums? I have the opportunity to grab a kit, 12x22 bass, 8x12 rack and a 16x16 floor tom.

Thoughts?
 

JDA

DFO Star
Silver Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2005
Messages
32,779
Reaction score
21,823
Location
Jeannette, Pa.
why wouldn't you ; They're classic drums..
pics price and condition let's see them.
talking brass hoops all the way round.. can't barely buy that stuff today.. mahog in the shells.. nickle here nickle there ; )
 

K.O.

DFO Star
Silver Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
22,408
Reaction score
6,551
Location
Illinois
That's my video that JDA posted. That 12x22 bass drum is one of the best sounding I own (and I own quite a few). A 16x16 would not have been part of the original set so having that included is a real plus as well (I had to hunt mine down, I have since added a matching 16x18 to the mix).

Really hard to go wrong with Ludwigs from this era. Especially if they are Pre-Beatle Boom early 60s when they were putting a bit more care into their construction.

New Yorker 2018.jpg


Just to be clear the New Yorkers aren't any different than any other Ludwig drums of the era. The name just refers to that particular combination of sizes (12/22) that were cataloged together. But it does mean you get that somewhat rare 12" deep bass drum which is a plus as they sound great. Most wrapped Ludwigs of that time were mahogany/poplar/mahogany although sometimes maple was used as an inner ply, particularly on bass drums.
 

sbarrett1106

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2020
Messages
123
Reaction score
30
That's my video that JDA posted. That 12x22 bass drum is one of the best sounding I own (and I own quite a few). A 16x16 would not have been part of the original set so having that included is a real plus as well (I had to hunt mine down, I have since added a matching 16x18 to the mix).

Really hard to go wrong with Ludwigs from this era. Especially if they are Pre-Beatle Boom early 60s when they were putting a bit more care into their construction.

View attachment 529507

Just to be clear the New Yorkers aren't any different than any other Ludwig drums of the era. The name just refers to that particular combination of sizes (12/22) that were cataloged together. But it does mean you get that somewhat rare 12" deep bass drum which is a plus as they sound great. Most wrapped Ludwigs of that time were mahogany/poplar/mahogany although sometimes maple was used as an inner ply, particularly on bass drums.
Thank you for that detailed explanation! that is a lovely kit you have there and yes, I agree, the 16x16 is definitely a plus! I am going to jump on it. I've only heard great things about the 12x22 bass drum. What are your thoughts about using this in a House of Worship? The kit I am looking at has the white shell paint inside.
 

K.O.

DFO Star
Silver Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
22,408
Reaction score
6,551
Location
Illinois
Thank you for that detailed explanation! that is a lovely kit you have there and yes, I agree, the 16x16 is definitely a plus! I am going to jump on it. I've only heard great things about the 12x22 bass drum. What are your thoughts about using this in a House of Worship? The kit I am looking at has the white shell paint inside.

Should work as well as any set for that usage. The white interiors started around 1961 or 62.

LD62-23.JPG
 

andlours

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2018
Messages
478
Reaction score
443
Location
Denver, CO
Thank you for that detailed explanation! that is a lovely kit you have there and yes, I agree, the 16x16 is definitely a plus! I am going to jump on it. I've only heard great things about the 12x22 bass drum. What are your thoughts about using this in a House of Worship? The kit I am looking at has the white shell paint inside.

They will definitely sound great in a worship situation. The only thing I would be hesitant about is the bass drum spurs and the floor tom leg mounts. The push button floor tom legs and folding spurs are great, but they aren’t the best for stability. Do you have pictures of the kit? All of us vintage drum nerds would love to see it.
 

sbarrett1106

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2020
Messages
123
Reaction score
30
They will definitely sound great in a worship situation. The only thing I would be hesitant about is the bass drum spurs and the floor tom leg mounts. The push button floor tom legs and folding spurs are great, but they aren’t the best for stability. Do you have pictures of the kit? All of us vintage drum nerds would love to see it.
Thank you! I will get some pics and share. Do you think there is a workaround for those bass drum spurs? I did notice that as well.
 

K.O.

DFO Star
Silver Supporting Member
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
22,408
Reaction score
6,551
Location
Illinois
They will definitely sound great in a worship situation. The only thing I would be hesitant about is the bass drum spurs and the floor tom leg mounts. The push button floor tom legs and folding spurs are great, but they aren’t the best for stability. Do you have pictures of the kit? All of us vintage drum nerds would love to see it.

A set from '62 onward should have the newer style leg brackets and spur mounts. The older ones will work but aren't quite as nice as the later design. The fold out spurs were never optimal but a bass drum anchor on the front hoop is a big help and in a semi-permanent set-up, like at a church, you could add a stop of some sort to the stage to hold everything in place.
 

andlours

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2018
Messages
478
Reaction score
443
Location
Denver, CO
Thank you! I will get some pics and share. Do you think there is a workaround for those bass drum spurs? I did notice that as well.

Whatever you do, do not drill the drum for modern spurs. I’ve had really good luck with the DW spurs that clamp on to the front hoop. That should allow you to get the front of the drum off the ground enough to get a good bass drum beater angle as well as keep it from creeping forward too much.

If it has the push-button floor Tom legs, the INDe BR2 bracket should work to replace those and give you something more solid that resonates better. If the kit is in really nice shape, just don’t do anything to permanently alter it.
 

andlours

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2018
Messages
478
Reaction score
443
Location
Denver, CO
A set from '62 onward should have the newer style leg brackets and spur mounts. The older ones will work but aren't quite as nice as the later design. The fold out spurs were never optimal but a bass drum anchor on the front hoop is a big help and in a semi-permanent set-up, like at a church, you could add a stop of some sort to the stage to hold everything in place.

I didn’t realize ‘62 was the cutoff year for the bass drum spur transition. Do you know when they stopped cataloguing the New Yorker? Was it 1964ish?
 

sbarrett1106

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2020
Messages
123
Reaction score
30
Whatever you do, do not drill the drum for modern spurs. I’ve had really good luck with the DW spurs that clamp on to the front hoop. That should allow you to get the front of the drum off the ground enough to get a good bass drum beater angle as well as keep it from creeping forward too much.

If it has the push-button floor Tom legs, the INDe BR2 bracket should work to replace those and give you something more solid that resonates better. If the kit is in really nice shape, just don’t do anything to permanently alter it.
Thank you! makes perfect sense
 


Top