metal shelled drum sets

yotr

Active Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2013
Messages
42
Reaction score
3
I picked up this Q galvanized steel set over the winter. They’re great drums, a little warmer and not as loud as the 70s stainless steel Ludwig set I’ve owned in the past. They’re also surprisingly light compared to the Ludwigs as well. Took them to my last gig (in February) and the sound guys loved them.
I am looking at getting another set and found a Q galvanized one also. It looks like an amazing kit! I am leaning towards getting a metal set this time around after having mahogany in years past. The person selling the Q galvanized has it at a pretty good price also. It's brand new but it does have a couple of scratches on it (not the irregularities in the metal that I would expect with this). He offered to take a decent amount off the price so I am considering it. I'm a little OCD at times but it's easier to accept with the type of metal being used. I also found Q copper one I liked but it is quite a bit more (I guess with copper being used). There is also a Q set locally that has a glitter wrap with birch wood. I didn't know Q even used birch but it has a great sound.

I am also considering a kalamazoo series aluminum drum set from Inde Drum. Josh built a set for me a few years ago and loved it. I sold it about a year ago and definitely regret it. It was the best set I have ever owned and that's coming from a previous Ludwig Classic Maple owner.
 
Last edited:

RIDDIM

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
4,021
Reaction score
770
Location
MD
I was thinking about picking up a Dunnett Ti kit a while back too. I loved the sound here:
Tb7d1-6fiD7-5zbcw-iXQzu-Uhp5k-b83CB .

A friend suggested I could get substantially the same sound, at a vastly lower price, if I looked for some 70's Ludwig SS drums. I ended up a getting a few, then a few more, put coated single ply heads on the toms - and love what they do. They work well in high and low volume situations. I play the kick with 2 EQ4s, wide open.

If I'm playing loudly, they come across recordings like Ginger Bakers toms. If I crank them a bit more, they remind me of La Mouzon's Fibes sound on Nyctaphobia - a sound I was not able to duplicate with previous (Pearl, Fibes) fiberglass kits. They can cut, bark, and growl. They work well at lower volumes too. PM if you want to hear them in a musical contexts.

The only caveat to beware of drums that may have been played open bottomed for a long time; they may be somewhat out of round. I had a 9x13 like that; ended up tracing a perfect 13" circe on a piece of paper, then placing the shell over that circle and tracing it, with a different color. Then I'd mark (with a felt tip) on the shell where it was out and compare the distances on the tracings. This shell had a bit of a bulge - maybe 1/4" inch. Judicious use of a few a rubber mallet and a few thick towels over the shell got the shell +/- 1/8" in round. From there I was able to get it to sound good.

The edges are rounded over, which may tend to mute them a bit - but that seems to work out.
 

indedrum

DFO Sponsor
Joined
Oct 29, 2010
Messages
859
Reaction score
526
Location
Kalamazoo
I have certainly become a big fan of metal shelled kits. I think the variety of sounds you can get by using different materials, thicknesses, and construction methods is larger than even wood kits. I started building metal shells as an experiment, but they were so good I had to bring them to production. Honestly, the Kalamazoo Series aluminum kits are my current favorite sounding drums. Here are a few sound samples:
 

RobbiefromAtlanta

Very well Known Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2013
Messages
1,124
Reaction score
285
Location
Atlanta
A336FB2A-BAFA-4635-B56C-8CCB815A1B4D.jpeg
A97DCD6F-9C59-41C9-9499-41E489DAC6F7.jpeg

I know I’ve shown them before but my Oriollo Phantom kit deserves some more screen time. They are shelved at the moment cuz I’m playing my acrylics but I might set them up this weekend for a change.
 

Elvis

The King of Rock'n'Roll
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
12,910
Reaction score
1,363
Location
Poulsbo, Wa.
Many years ago, I recorded a friend's custom 1/4" thick aluminum kit - not large sizes, but they were so damn loud! Since, I've always been interested in the old Ludwig stainless kits, but got interested a little too late to catch them at an affordable price. I did notice that Tama started making a steel kit recently, but I'm curious about the more boutique efforts these days - A&F, Q Drum, etc. (esp considering that new Tama offering is $1200 for just 3 drums and I've heard only so-so things about them).

I know a friend of a friend with a custom Dunnett titanium kit - supposedly it sounds bananas, but unsure if I'd ever get a chance to play on it or any other one like it. For those of you who have shelled out those serious $$ for one of those rare and pricey kits, what made you sure yo were buying the right materials/sizes for you?

And I'm curious who has played on those things metal kits mentioned (A&F, Q Drum, etc) and how did you feel about them?

I have a thing for overkill - have a 40 lbs cold rolled steel snare a friend built me out of a pipe! I love my old school StarClassic kit, but a metal kit really intrigues me.
I got to try out one of Ronn Dunnett's stainless steel kits once.
Very warm and fat.
Back in the 1960's MIJ "Apollo" made a steel shelled kit called a Starfinder....

 

phdamage

Member
Joined
Feb 6, 2009
Messages
20
Reaction score
17
some good info in here, thank you all! very curious about Oriollo now for an upcoming snare purchase I had planned! But definitely curious about Inde drum now - though seems most kits only come with 14" depth - curious if that's a limitation with them or just what they chose?
 

stevil

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 13, 2015
Messages
322
Reaction score
204
Location
Portland, OR
some good info in here, thank you all! very curious about Oriollo now for an upcoming snare purchase I had planned! But definitely curious about Inde drum now - though seems most kits only come with 14" depth - curious if that's a limitation with them or just what they chose?
14" is a common manufacturing limitation. The Tama SLP kit has 16" deep toms and bass drums though.
 

RIDDIM

DFO Master
Joined
Aug 5, 2005
Messages
4,021
Reaction score
770
Location
MD
14" is a common manufacturing limitation. The Tama SLP kit has 16" deep toms and bass drums though.
- What I've heard of the Tamas on line and in shops is warm and dark - a lot like my SS Ludwigs when they're tuned down a bit. I wouldn't sleep on either.
 

stevil

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 13, 2015
Messages
322
Reaction score
204
Location
Portland, OR
- What I've heard of the Tamas on line and in shops is warm and dark - a lot like my SS Ludwigs when they're tuned down a bit. I wouldn't sleep on either.
I really want to snag a set, but I grabbed a Jenkins Martin kit instead. I can't justify a new set without dropping something else.
 


Top