Modern edges, older drums.

D. B. Cooper

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Have any of you ever put modern, sharper edges on an older drum that came from the factory with round overs?
I'm wondering about what sharp edges would do on a 60's-70's Slingerland shell with stick savers?
Any relative experience?
 

steambent

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I have heard of trueing up edges on older drums especially snares but I have never had it done. A guy in NYC named Nodor ? is well known for redoing vintage snare edges and snare beds.
 

CaptainCrunch

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I don’t have any relevant “I A/B’d this kit and recorded it so here give it a listen” info to add, but I’d guess that most of the vintage kits that get The Full Business would have gotten it because they had pretty jacked-up edges, and of course sounded better afterwards.

If you go from a rounder edge to a sharper one, all the research shows you gain attack and sustain at the expense of warmth and “woof” (or whatever you want to call it). There are modern builders who have actually done multiple edge styles on the same shell and recorded to show this.

If you look at the mechanics of it, I think the rering DW’s are an answer to the “vintage-style shell, but sharp edges” question.
 

JDA

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A Slingerland with rering___ the "bearing edge" area always seemed to me (I saw one Once I think)____ looked to be about 3" Wide (exaggerating)___
How the h-e- double hockey stick would you put a 45 on that D.B.?
Wouldn't it be more like a 72/72 ? Maybe an 80/80 ?
Or maybe I got it backwards. A 10/10 ?
If the degree is from 12 o'clock high.. I think a 15/15 in/out the most you'll get..
 

Beefsurgeon

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Yep. I worked at Spaun for a decade, and people would occasionally ask us to cut our double-45 edge on their vintage drums. As blasphemous as it may seem, the results always sounded pretty darn good. Granted, going from nearly untunable to a perfectly flat edge of any profile is always going to be an improvement, but the combo of vintage shell with the double-45 worked really well. It made it much easier to seat heads in many cases, which really opens up the bottom of the tuning range. On my own projects, I preferred to slightly round the outer edge and peak to preserve a bit of thump vs boom.

Shells with thick rerings were no problem. We'd always cut the peak a consistent distance from the outer ply, and take the rest from the inside.

With all that said, I think a more standard modern edge (ie 45 with just a slight countercut, peak almost at the outer edge of the shell) might exacerbate any head fit issues and substantially decrease the tuning range on some drums.
 

D. B. Cooper

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With all that said, I think a more standard modern edge (ie 45 with just a slight countercut, peak almost at the outer edge of the shell) might exacerbate any head fit issues and substantially decrease the tuning range on some drums.
But probably only a problem with oversized shells, right? Do folks have many probably with Slingerland in that regard?
 

jaymandude

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Unless the bearing edges are destroyed it would be a lot easier to just buy modern drums
It's not the same tho.. Old wood, already seasoned. Mahogany and poplar often.

When I was young and stupid I did this on a Club Date kit. It wasn't a double 45, just a clean round over. The drums sounded so damn good. Everyone hates it I know, But sonically it's killer.
 

BennyK

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Sonor 3 ply teardrops had the perfect edge for their shells , I don't think this was a happy accident but resulted from considerable research . It was a round baseball bat edge .

With some of the vintage American shells, you can experiment, but nine times out of ten you'll come up with the Rogers Swivo era profile which more less defined what came after from a diversity of manufacturers .

To answer your question, yes I have modernized vintage edges with questionable results .
 
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mkelley

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Sonor 3 ply teardrops had the perfect edge for their shells , I don't think this was a happy accident but resulted from considerable research . It was a round baseball bat edge .

With some of the vintage American shells, you can experiment, but nine times out of ten you'll come up with the Rogers Swivo era profile which more less defined what came after from a diversity of manufacturers .

To answer your question, yes I have modernized vintage edges with questionable results .
I've never played a bad teardrop kit. Those shells and edges have it. Especially at higher tunings.
 

JDA

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Sucks a little of the heart and soul (unless damaged previous I mean "doing it just to do it"..
Sucks a little character out replaces it with a cleaner narrower clarity.
Turns it into a "new drum" but not necessarily how 'that' drum sounded new.
I mean turns it closer towards a new 80s or 90s drum
 

Browny

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But probably only a problem with oversized shells, right? Do folks have many probably with Slingerland in that regard?
My 40s Slingerland's are oversized shells with big, round, baseball bat edges.

Classic Fit Ambassadors are the only heads that fit well, and they sound amazing. You get that attack/stick sound and tone from the coated amb but the big fat edges seem to really warm them up and kind of contain the sound.

Tune them low and apply a bit of gaffer and they do deep, rich 'rock' toms... perhaps not metal or some modern rock styles as they're possibly a little soft, although if I put clear CF ambs top & bottom (currently got coated over clear) you might get some of those plasticy highs that cut a little more.

I normally have them unmuffled and tuned I guess what I'd describe as med low or a little under medium, and that works in my normal contexts of rock & sometimes more bluesy stuff. They still project pretty well; we record our rehearsals with a Tascam dr-05 and the toms usually feel pretty balanced compared to kick (26") and a jarrah stave snare.

I'm not sure I'd want to radically change the edges to modern 45s or similar, it would probably take away all the mojo/vibe that is central to the drums sounding great. To be honest, my edges are a bit rough and the drums can be temperamental when trying to tune, but if it ain't broke don't fix it. The only thing I'd consider would be having someone recut/finish the edges to maintain the original profile but clean them up to higher standard & make sure they're true/dead flat.
 

el_37

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Honestly there are enough devalued Slingerland shells out there with bad re-wraps, extra holes, etc. that you can experiment with guilt free since they have next to zero collectible value.

Surely you will still upset a few members of the Vintage Bearing Edge Police- Keyboard Warrior Division. But I still wouldn't worry. Better to bring a pile of abandoned shells back to life in the name of experimentation than to let them turn into firewood or compost.
 

Drumstickdude

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I got this solid shell slingerland radio king/ artist model ?!! in 2013 . Even though it's my pride and joy, On 2016 I made a painstaking decision to have the edges trued up by a profesional, although it sounded good already. My bedroom door knocked onto it slightly and at least in my head I thought it didn't sound as good after tat although I now believe that couldn't have harmed it that I'd imagined it. So, I got Gary Noonan) who I read has experience of doing vintage slingerland artist models and maybe some radio kings edges, to do the work, I said just keep them to the original profile. He confirmed that the edges were quite flat and I also needed some cracks in the re rings glueing. And that the snare beds weren't aligned well at all. It sounds just like it should sound now, and tunes up and down easier, and tunes a bit higher than it would before, but I always have it in the same sweet spot. I hated doing anything to a vintage snare like this but needed doing and I won't ever sell it, the only thing I notice different about how the edges look is the slope upwards is a bit steeper, he said it's still a round edge, can anyone give me any details of the exact type of description these edges would be? I'd like to know more. These are the only pics I have showing the results.
 

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