Moeller Technique

Ray Dee Oh King

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Hello Everyone: So I have been back into playing for nearly 8 months now. Being self taught over the years i decided to start learning rudiments, and specific technique. I have been practicing the Moeller technique for about 6 months and I cant seem to get it. im not sure if i am missing something. I have watched multiple videos and none really have helped me. Im not sure if i do not understand exactly what theyre doing or if i am missing something. Can anyone shed some light or send me in the right direction to help me out here ?
 

multijd

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Not a "Moeller" expert. But maybe a few words of advice on the rudiments that could help you.
All rudiments contain two things, an upstroke and a downstroke. At the most basic an upstroke is a tap (or grace) after which you lift the stick. This upstroke usually prepares an accent. A down stroke starts higher (usually in an accent height) and stays down after striking. It is ususally the accent in the rudiment. Many rudiments have more strokes than that but they all have those two. The most basic rudiment is the flam that contains only an upstroke in one hand followed by a downstroke in the other. In order to play the rudiments correctly you must master the placement of these two strokes. The most common errors are not keeping the downstroke down, especially as you increase the speed, and not lifting the stick to prepare the accent. I brlieve the Moeller technique is a breakdown of how to achieve these strokes. For simplicity sake I teach that the upstroke involves kepping your wrist loose and lifting the stick by bending the elbow. The center of this action is the fulcrum. Taps and grace notes are activated with the wrist. The fingers are involved in multiple successive strokes (doubles,triples,quads).

One more piece of advice is to utilize the rebound from the downstroke to redirect the energy with the fingers so that each iteration of the rudiment is one motion in each hand. These motions should be identical but offset. The smoother this motion is the better the rudiment will sound and feel and the faster you will be able to execute it. "Splitting the hands" by isolating what each hand does in the rudiment can help to identify and perfect the motion of the upstroke, downstroke and successive other strokes. Do this by playing the rudiment (slowly is fine) then moving one hand to your leg so that you can clearly hear the sound of one hand in the rudiment. Once you can do this memorize the rhythm that the one hand is playing. Play the hand alone and identify where the accent should be. The accent is the downstroke. The last stroke in the same hand that precedes the downstroke is the upstroke. Practice that motion in each hand until it is fluid. Then put the rudiment back together and make sure you are using that fluid motion in each hand.
 

multijd

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Here is a link with a demonstration of the five stroke roll in compound meter ala three camps.
 
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Ray Dee Oh King

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multijd said:
Not a "Moeller" expert. But maybe a few words of advice on the rudiments that could help you.
All rudiments contain two things, an upstroke and a downstroke. At the most basic an upstroke is a tap (or grace) after which you lift the stick. This upstroke usually prepares an accent. A down stroke starts higher (usually in an accent height) and stays down after striking. It is ususally the accent in the rudiment. Many rudiments have more strokes than that but they all have those two. The most basic rudiment is the flam that contains only an upstroke in one hand followed by a downstroke in the other. In order to play the rudiments correctly you must master the placement of these two strokes. The most common errors are not keeping the downstroke down, especially as you increase the speed, and not lifting the stick to prepare the accent. I brlieve the Moeller technique is a breakdown of how to achieve these strokes. For simplicity sake I teach that the upstroke involves kepping your wrist loose and lifting the stick by bending the elbow. The center of this action is the fulcrum. Taps and grace notes are activated with the wrist. The fingers are involved in multiple successive strokes (doubles,triples,quads).
One more piece of advice is to utilize the rebound from the downstroke to redirect the energy with the fingers so that each iteration of the rudiment is one motion in each hand. These motions should be identical but offset. The smoother this motion is the better the rudiment will sound and feel and the faster you will be able to execute it. "Splitting the hands" by isolating what each hand does in the rudiment can help to identify and perfect the motion of the upstroke, downstroke and successive other strokes. Do this by playing the rudiment (slowly is fine) then moving one hand to your leg so that you can clearly hear the sound of one hand in the rudiment. Once you can do this memorize the rhythm that the one hand is playing. Play the hand alone and identify where the accent should be. The accent is the downstroke. The last stroke in the same hand that precedes the downstroke is the upstroke. Practice that motion in each hand until it is fluid. Then put the rudiment back together and make sure you are using that fluid motion in each hand.
Thank you very much for the reply. The info is great. Now to just apply it. Much appreciated!
 

multijd

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Ray Dee Oh King said:
Not a "Moeller" expert. But maybe a few words of advice on the rudiments that could help you.
All rudiments contain two things, an upstroke and a downstroke. At the most basic an upstroke is a tap (or grace) after which you lift the stick. This upstroke usually prepares an accent. A down stroke starts higher (usually in an accent height) and stays down after striking. It is ususally the accent in the rudiment. Many rudiments have more strokes than that but they all have those two. The most basic rudiment is the flam that contains only an upstroke in one hand followed by a downstroke in the other. In order to play the rudiments correctly you must master the placement of these two strokes. The most common errors are not keeping the downstroke down, especially as you increase the speed, and not lifting the stick to prepare the accent. I brlieve the Moeller technique is a breakdown of how to achieve these strokes. For simplicity sake I teach that the upstroke involves kepping your wrist loose and lifting the stick by bending the elbow. The center of this action is the fulcrum. Taps and grace notes are activated with the wrist. The fingers are involved in multiple successive strokes (doubles,triples,quads).
One more piece of advice is to utilize the rebound from the downstroke to redirect the energy with the fingers so that each iteration of the rudiment is one motion in each hand. These motions should be identical but offset. The smoother this motion is the better the rudiment will sound and feel and the faster you will be able to execute it. "Splitting the hands" by isolating what each hand does in the rudiment can help to identify and perfect the motion of the upstroke, downstroke and successive other strokes. Do this by playing the rudiment (slowly is fine) then moving one hand to your leg so that you can clearly hear the sound of one hand in the rudiment. Once you can do this memorize the rhythm that the one hand is playing. Play the hand alone and identify where the accent should be. The accent is the downstroke. The last stroke in the same hand that precedes the downstroke is the upstroke. Practice that motion in each hand until it is fluid. Then put the rudiment back together and make sure you are using that fluid motion in each hand.
Thank you very much for the reply. The info is great. Now to just apply it. Much appreciated!
You got it! Glad to help!M
 

Morello Man

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Hello Everyone: So I have been back into playing for nearly 8 months now. Being self taught over the years i decided to start learning rudiments, and specific technique. I have been practicing the Moeller technique for about 6 months and I cant seem to get it. im not sure if i am missing something. I have watched multiple videos and none really have helped me. Im not sure if i do not understand exactly what theyre doing or if i am missing something. Can anyone shed some light or send me in the right direction to help me out here ?
Jim Chapin, on YouTube, is worth checking out, I would think.
 

Seb77

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With a good teacher, all it takes is one lesson, some practice time, and another lesson to check if you still got it. That is, if the teacher knows what he/shes's doing and you have basic motor skills together. We would have to see your playing to give you feedback. Maybe you can set up a Skype/Zoom call with a good teacher. Even greats such as Dave Weckl offer them these days.

My 2c for now: It starts with where and how you grip the stick (pinky and ringifnger should be included, hardly any index finger/thumb involved). Stay loose, just hold the stick enough so it doesn't drop. Tthe stick tip hangs down while you raise your lower arm/hand. Perform a whipping motion with the stick tip follwing the arm motion (whip stroke or downstroke).
From the stick tip hanging down while winding up you develop the upstroke, a light stroke before leaving. Later, add more of those quiet strokes, raise the lower arm with the last one.
 

Toast Tee

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If you follow along with this video, you will get it.
This man was it for Moller technique
 

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