Moon Gell Substitutes

Swamptrashstompboxes

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I also use dollar tree gel window decorations.

I used to use them more, but now I just use a little piece to take the ring off on my pork pie 13"x6" steal snare.

I find that as far as metal shells go, I am happier with the gel. I will use a bit on wooden toms, but I feel that with a lot of wood snares you lose a little bit of character.
 

alanolynn

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Moon Gels are washable. I've held on to the same set for months at a time. Yeah, its a pain to take care of, but if money is the key factor in wanting to change your plan, why not just save your money after one purchase and reuse the same gels? Just my $.02
 

Drumceet

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I use small amounts of gaffer tape, fold in the middle to create a fin, and place between two lugs.

I don’t use anything on my 12” tom, but use one piece each on my 14” and 16” floor toms, and two pieces on my snare. My Ludwig Supra 402 never sounded so good.
 

dcrigger

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Just say NO to gaffer's tape!
Sorry - and if you don't find it useful, that's cool. But....

"just say no to gaff" flies totally contrary to what I've seen on countless stages and recording sessions. Again, whatever works for you is cool, but as advice for others to heed, I'd at least have to ask, why???

Because the method Drumceet mentioned - where you take a piece (at just the desire size - from barely touching the head to covering a significant amount) folded in the middle to create a fin (or fins) that again can be as tall or short as desired (all these choices affect the muffling)... I don't know of a more versatile muffling technique - that can easily be changed from room to room, gig to gig, session to session with so little hassle or expense.

Using gaffer's tape for muffling can be so much more subtle and nuanced than the cliche of just slapping a strip across the head.
 

Drumceet

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I’ve used everything from Moon Gel to o rings, and nothing has given me the type of tones that gaffer tape gives me.

The gaffer tape really controls those overtones, and sounds that different rooms will help produce without killing the personality of the drum.

Gaffer tapes still allows the drum to sing, and you can completely control the muffling you want, whereas there isn’t much control in a O ring. I find those kill drum tone.
 

hector48

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OK. Here's what I don't understand.
Drum manufacturers do everything they can to make the shell resonate
(rubber gaskets, bridged lugs, rim mounts, reducing shell contact, etc).
Then, we muffle the head anyway?
 
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Drumceet

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What a shell sounds like or how it resonates has a lot to do with the room you are playing in. Also, if you are recording an engineer or producer might have a different vision in mind.

I've found that the really expensive pro sets need little muffling or none at all. If you take the Yamaha Stage custom kit, it's a $1000 kit and perhaps there will be some that like the toms as is, but perhaps a specific situation calls for a little taming.

I don't see the big deal. I've finally got my snare to sound like Bonham's and I use two small pieces of gaffer tape in between two lugs, and he used nothing!!!

I've walked into studio's where the tech took tissue paper and taped it down on the skin, and although the sound behind the kit wasn't to my liking, once I heard the play back I thought they sounded killer. Hell they sounded killer in the next room.

I'm not one to kill a drum with heaving muffling, and I believe a drum should breath and allowed to show it's personality with the tone it gives off, but a little gaffer tape is no big deal. Especially when you end up getting the sound out of the drum that's in your head.
 

High on Stress

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OK. Here's what I don't understand.
Drum manufacturers do everything they can to make the shell resonate
(rubber gaskets, bridged lugs, rim mounts, reducing shell contact, etc).
Then, we muffle the head anyway?
I think there is a difference between head overtones and those produced by the shell and other components of a drum. I agree it would be a little silly to have RIMS mounts on taped up Hydraulic heads or something similarly extreme. Personally, I want as much resonance/tone/overtones/what have you from the drum available to me and then I decide how and to what extent I need to tame any of that down for a specific application.
 

dcrigger

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OK. Here's what I don't understand.
Drum manufacturers do everything they can to make the shell resonate
(rubber gaskets, bridged lugs, rim mounts, reducing shell contact, etc).
Then, we muffle the head anyway?
Why? Because in the pursuit of getting just the right sound - which of course is made even more difficult by there being so many "right sounds" to go for - we are faced with the reality that we can't add more to a drum's biggest. largest, most resonant sound. We can only subtract those bits that don't suit our needs at that moment.

So our drum manufacturers do their part in trying to provide instruments with as few inherent limitations as possible - knowing that we, in the field, can always dial it back as needed.

In other words, for me - some times I need a very dry, short, contained sound and other times, I need the drums to just sing out. Well a choked, restricted, lackluster instrument can never give me that second sound. It might be able to do the first, but never the second. Conversely a well made, great sounding drum can give me both - with even the dry, muffled sound likely sounding better than the more limited drum.

There is never just one way, one best sound.... and I don't think the manufacturers see their job as anything beyond providing us with tools... tools that we as players are tasked with making sound "right" for each musical situation.
 

dcrigger

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It just looks like do-do.
If I cared whether my drums looked like the catalog - I'd be a photographer. :)

Personally - whenever I see how my idols get this sound or that - I find the look of it to be cool as all get out.... beautiful. Again, drums don't look like drums in catalogs and ads... but on stage or in a session... now that's the real thing... the real look...

...at least for me.
 


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