Most recorded snare - Supraphonic lm400 was it brass or aluminum shell?

drumtimejohn

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When Ludwig uses the sale line "the most recorded drum in history" they are/were referring to aluminum shelled drums because that is what they were selling at the time. The vast majority of Ludwig 400 model snare drums were made of aluminum. The precursor to the Supraphonic, the Ludwig Super, was made of brass. That drum was made for about 5 years (1958-1963). Tho the drums look outwardly similar the shell construction was quite different between the two. The brass drums used a rolled shell with a seam and crimped in snare beds. The aluminum shells are spun seamless with a very gradual bed. The aluminum drum has been in production from 1963 to present and vastly outnumbers the brass version. Eventually Ludwig did bring brass back in the form of the black beauty in 1977 and later a new COB version. These drums share the seamless shell design and are therefore still different than the Supers. Really no other snare has been produced in the kind of numbers that the aluminum supra has ( except for its little brother the acro, which uses the same shell) and it is by virtue of these sheer production numbers that Ludwig can make the "most recorded" claim. It seems that in the late 60s on thru the 70s and into the 80s almost everyone was using Supras as their snare. Since then the amount of choices available have somewhat diluted the Supras stature but they are still pretty common. So if your goal is for the most recorded you probably want an aluminum 400.
Bingo!
 

Drummer1990

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When Ludwig uses the sale line "the most recorded drum in history" they are/were referring to aluminum shelled drums because that is what they were selling at the time. The vast majority of Ludwig 400 model snare drums were made of aluminum. The precursor to the Supraphonic, the Ludwig Super, was made of brass. That drum was made for about 5 years (1958-1963). Tho the drums look outwardly similar the shell construction was quite different between the two. The brass drums used a rolled shell with a seam and crimped in snare beds. The aluminum shells are spun seamless with a very gradual bed. The aluminum drum has been in production from 1963 to present and vastly outnumbers the brass version. Eventually Ludwig did bring brass back in the form of the black beauty in 1977 and later a new COB version. These drums share the seamless shell design and are therefore still different than the Supers. Really no other snare has been produced in the kind of numbers that the aluminum supra has ( except for its little brother the acro, which uses the same shell) and it is by virtue of these sheer production numbers that Ludwig can make the "most recorded" claim. It seems that in the late 60s on thru the 70s and into the 80s almost everyone was using Supras as their snare. Since then the amount of choices available have somewhat diluted the Supras stature but they are still pretty common. So if your goal is for the most recorded you probably want an aluminum 400.
Thanks K.O and everyone who has contributed to this thread. This really helps me understand everything better. Needs to be more like you who can educate people who don't understand things. By reading your responses I totally understand now. Thank you
 

tillerva

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Hal Blaine, being arguably the most recorded drummer in history playing the most recorded drum in history...I always assumed it was the Ludalloy/aluminum model, but a post above asserts it was the brass precursor.

Just curious now if that is the case for sure.
 

Kcmcc

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Just a further semantic clarification:
When the Supraphonic is referred to as "the most recorded" it's a reference to times that ANY supraphonic went down on record, and yeah, almost certainly this title goes to the supraphonic per se - Ludalloy,
But you could probably also make a case for Hal Blaine's brass super being the most recorded individual drum (not entirely sure anyone can say that he was actually "more recorded" than say Palmer or some New York guys, but if he used that snare on almost everything in his peak years . . .)
 

p83

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Hal Blaine, being arguably the most recorded drummer in history playing the most recorded drum in history...I always assumed it was the Ludalloy/aluminum model, but a post above asserts it was the brass precursor.

Just curious now if that is the case for sure.
hal's main snare was COB.
 

K.O.

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yeah it could easily be open to interpretation.
Most recorded single snare drum as far as number of sessions and resulting recordings, probably Hal's 400.


Single snare drum most often heard by people on the resulting recordings...most likely Ringo's #1 Jazz festival, which he used on nearly every Beatles recording from mid 1963 onward. Hard to think of another single drum that has been on more recordings that have been in constant heavy radio play and album sales for over a half century. Hal's drum probably comes in second, if he always used the same one. He had at least two sets that traveled around from studio to studio.


Snare model used by the most different drummers at various recording sessions...that's where the aluminum 400 comes in, just because it's so ubiquitous.
 

gkrk

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The brass hoops are part of the Hal Blaine Ludwig 400 sound and likely of the aluminum shelled version
until the hoops went to steel.

And I imagine Hal didn't use that single snare drum exclusively on all those hits.
 

p83

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The brass hoops are part of the Hal Blaine Ludwig 400 sound and likely of the aluminum shelled version
until the hoops went to steel.

And I imagine Hal didn't use that single snare drum exclusively on all those hits.
i got to hang with hal and his fantastic tech and right hand man rick faucher a little bit. several blue sparkle sets, 2 monster sets, but 1 small set of cymbals and mainly that 400. it started in the phil spector days. my friend owns monster set #1 and it came with ''the snare''. monster set #2 came with hal's B/O badge 402.
 

gkrk

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I've got that great interview someone did with Rick Faucher tucked away somewhere. And for some
glitch in my memory, I thought he said something about the snare drum, metal being metal. I'll dig around for it. Or maybe someone here has it near at hand.
 
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DolFan54

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If you can find a pre-serial, that is a great drum. I got lucky enough to find a 6.5x14 as well as the 5x14. Although they are both brass they are very different because of their size differences. Even if you decide on a Ludalloy, get one of each, they are very different!
 

kdgrissom

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Some of the "cut badge" B\O supra's were brass as well. That was around '69 or '70. I'm not too sure about their back story, but I own one (5x14). Did they make a 6.5?
 

JazzDrumGuy

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Some of the "cut badge" B\O supra's were brass as well. That was around '69 or '70. I'm not too sure about their back story, but I own one (5x14). Did they make a 6.5?
I think this was because the Blue/Olive badge was too big to fit on some of the older remaining COB shells, especially the 5-inch drums, so they had to snip the bottom of it.
 

K.O.

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I think this was because the Blue/Olive badge was too big to fit on some of the older remaining COB shells, especially the 5-inch drums, so they had to snip the bottom of it.
I saw a cut badge supra at Music Go Round a few years back and got very excited. Turned out it was an aluminum shell. If I remember right it was date stamped early 1970.
 

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