My 14" floor tom resonates forever.

hector48

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I recently got a DW Performance kit with a 14" floor tom.
I know the companies all strive for max resonance, but this thing resonates for an extremely long time.
I'm currently using an Evans UV2 2-ply batter head, and an Evans EC reso head.
I tune the batter just above wrinkles and the resonant head quite a bit tighter.
I tried some gels on the batter, and discovered that a lot of the sustain is actually from the bottom head.
I tried 2 gels on the reso head, and it still rings a lot.
I guess next step is some duct tape on the reso.
But wow, I never had to go this extreme.

I want to stay with the 2-ply coated batter head.
Should I try a thicker reso head, like 12 or 14 mil to reduce sustain ??
 

Fat Drummer

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Nice problem to have though right! As they say, it's always easier to take resonance out then try to find it in a dead drum! I love 14" floors for this very reason, something about that size just sings to my ear as well.

If a gel on the reso side did not dampen it enough then I doubt duct tape will either, as they are both operating on the same principle as mechanical riders on the head head surface. For myself, I would loosen one lug to mute the fundamental tone a bit and slow the resonance. Not to the point of extremes of course, but de-tuning a single lug (and it's partner on the opposite side if still necessary) does the trick for me usually. I'm sure others will have more detailed and better suggestions but that's my offering.

Let us know what you do to get the final sound you are after and good luck,

Ward
 

Ray Dee Oh King

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When I couldn't calm down the resonance on one of my floor toms, I went with an Aquarian Studio X head for the reso, and it helped tremendously. Try a pre muffled head for a reso.
 

jsp210

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If you are tuning the batter just above wrinkles and the resonant head "quite a bit tighter" I would first try loosening the tension on the resonant head about a quarter turn at a time until you get that quicker decay. This usually does the trick with the addition of a bit of muffling added to the batter.
 

hector48

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If you are tuning the batter just above wrinkles and the resonant head "quite a bit tighter" I would first try loosening the tension on the resonant head about a quarter turn at a time until you get that quicker decay. This usually does the trick with the addition of a bit of muffling added to the batter.
This is where I get confused. My thought is that a looser tensioning on the reso would decrease sustain. However, the Tune-Bot info indicates that a larger "difference" in the pitch of the batter and resonant heads with reduce sustain. Since my batter is loose, I assumed I should tighten the reso to get a larger difference. But imo, any head that is tight would ring more.
 

singleordoubleheads

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According to the vast majority here, you have hit the Jackpot, because, again, according to the majority of thinking here, every drum should ring/resonate for at least an hour, and, by extension, ALL muffling is bad, terrible and horrible and stictly for newbies with their 1st $100 kit bought at a garage sale. (Pay zero attention to the fact that Many of the greatest records ever made had moderate to LOTS of muffling). So.....let that sucker RING, or risk getting crushed by the purists!!
 

jsp210

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This is where I get confused. My thought is that a looser tensioning on the reso would decrease sustain. However, the Tune-Bot info indicates that a larger "difference" in the pitch of the batter and resonant heads with reduce sustain. Since my batter is loose, I assumed I should tighten the reso to get a larger difference. But imo, any head that is tight would ring more.
No need for confusion and speculation my friend.

Grab your key and start by getting the bottom head to that same ballpark as where you currently have your batter at and try it there and then go slightly tighter with the reso.
I would be surprised if this didn't get you that floor tom sound you are after.
 

hector48

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Could also be a matter of standing waves in your room. Does the same happen outside?
I am in a fairly small isolated practice room. I haven't used the tom elsewhere yet.
 

CherryClassic

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Personally I prefer the ring in all my toms. I want to hear the robust tone coming from them. When playing with a band the lingering ring normally gets lost in the mix.

I've noticed lately at the beginning of my gigs I'll use a Moon Jel like product thinking it's ringing too much then later while playing I start removing them and like the openness better.

Tuning one head tighter than the other (I would prefer the bottom higher) will shorten sustain. You can try putting varying amounts of cotton balls inside but the problem is once that's done you can't change it without removing the head. Another thing I've noticed when playing on a crowded stage getting up close to a corner of a room tends to delete resonance from the floor tom.

sherm
 

Barden

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Those floor tom legs bend at 90 degrees. Straight floor tom legs will greatly reduce sustain. That's why you flip the floor tom leg or get straight legs. You can also put sandbags or something like that onto the bent legs.
 

TheBeachBoy

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The straight leg doesn't have as much flex so it connects the drum with the floor more than with the bent legs. The floor dampens the shell vibrations. I can't remember who makes it, but there's a company that has an adjustable floor tom leg where you can give it as much or little bending as you want.

Another trick is to add cotton balls inside the drum. They'll float up when the drum is struck to let the note ring, but quickly fall down to dampen the bottom head.
 


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