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My Favorite Drum Company Would Be Perfect, If Only They...?

bon viesta

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if ludwig made a reproduction rail mount for toms, and mounted them so the badge was two “panels” away from the badge. aka the right way!
 

notINtheband

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While my favorite drum kits are currently my 2 Saturn kits, I also drool over the occasional Yamaha and Tama kits.
I’m one of the die-hard Mapex Saturn cult guys, but honestly love the sound and look from several other manufacturers.

But if the subject were cymbal companies,
It’s an easy hands-down for me.
I have, and still own dozens (no exaggeration) of cymbals from Zildjian and Sabian.

But Paiste is my favorite.
I will likely never buy another cymbal that isn’t a Paiste simply because every one I own sounds better than any other similar type cymbal from another company to my ears.
(All of the above subject to change without notice)
;)
 

healthie1

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I would love for that to be true. But it's never going to happen for two main reasons.

1. Customers won't pay for it. Even if they would...
2. They don't care where it's made any more.

It's already been mentioned in this thread that things cost too much. I knew that would be a thing right when I saw the thread title. And yes yes I know there are lots of people who do care (and obviously you do), which I personally appreciate, but the vast majority of the drum/percussion buying public doesn't. Saying "Made in USA" is only marginally effective or influential now when used by companies as a core value proposition. We still say it, DW does, Gretsch, Ludwig, etc., not because it's just a marketing tactic, but because it's important to us and a point of pride. On the other hand, we all source components or sell ship-ready products made elsewhere. On the other other hand, everyone I just mentioned does a LOT of manufacturing in their own factory.

Many parts are not even made in the USA any more. Hoops and tension rods first come to mind. Could they be made here? Sure, but see #1 above. I have two key suppliers in Taiwan. I don't have any regrets, doubts, or shame by working with them. I know them personally, have had dinner with them, and know them as friends. We work as partners together and it's not like some faceless, disconnected transaction like buying something off Amazon. So there's that side of it.

Another side of it, is that they are really good at what they do. If you give them 60% of what you require in a new part, they know enough about drums and engineering that they can fill in the other 40%. Their quality more than rivals the quality that can be obtained stateside.

One of my pet peeves is when a company actively hides or obfuscates the fact they rely heavily on components made elsewhere. Crap like "there's no we, only me". That's an easy one to pick apart and I won't even bother.

In this globally connected economy there is still the advantage that USA based companies can ship OUR products all over the world.

There's a great youtube show called wyrmlife where they follow the antics of the wyrmwood company - they make high-end wood products targetted at a table-top gaming audience. They talk about this metal cup holder - the cost was $0.07 from china, or like $6 from the US. You can't even compare it.
 

rsmittee

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Another vote for a Yamaha/Sakae reunion. I love my old Yamaha birch kit.

I love my RN2's from Gretsch. I just wish they sold a 14x12 FT add on to go with my 16x14 FT. I had to settle for the 14x14, which sounds fine, I just don't care for the "square" shells.

I wish stick makers would standardize sizes so that a 5A is a 5A is a 5A.
 

xtranoise

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I would love for that to be true. But it's never going to happen for two main reasons.

1. Customers won't pay for it. Even if they would...
2. They don't care where it's made any more.

It's already been mentioned in this thread that things cost too much. I knew that would be a thing right when I saw the thread title. And yes yes I know there are lots of people who do care (and obviously you do), which I personally appreciate, but the vast majority of the drum/percussion buying public doesn't. Saying "Made in USA" is only marginally effective or influential now when used by companies as a core value proposition. We still say it, DW does, Gretsch, Ludwig, etc., not because it's just a marketing tactic, but because it's important to us and a point of pride. On the other hand, we all source components or sell ship-ready products made elsewhere. On the other other hand, everyone I just mentioned does a LOT of manufacturing in their own factory.

Many parts are not even made in the USA any more. Hoops and tension rods first come to mind. Could they be made here? Sure, but see #1 above. I have two key suppliers in Taiwan. I don't have any regrets, doubts, or shame by working with them. I know them personally, have had dinner with them, and know them as friends. We work as partners together and it's not like some faceless, disconnected transaction like buying something off Amazon. So there's that side of it.

Another side of it, is that they are really good at what they do. If you give them 60% of what you require in a new part, they know enough about drums and engineering that they can fill in the other 40%. Their quality more than rivals the quality that can be obtained stateside.

One of my pet peeves is when a company actively hides or obfuscates the fact they rely heavily on components made elsewhere. Crap like "there's no we, only me". That's an easy one to pick apart and I won't even bother.

In this globally connected economy there is still the advantage that USA based companies can ship OUR products all over the world.
@esooy I wonder at times if the US buying public realizes the role they (we) play in all of this? Most demand things to be cheap (inexpensive) and think only of that. My opinion for decades has been that everyone wants to be a millionaire but pay Walmart prices for stuff. That cannot work. Someone has to work at Walmart and make the Walmart wage. I used to do some hobby woodworking and on the woodworking forums guys would always be "all this crap is made in China!!!" when referring to the tools then in the next breath would be "where can I get so and so for the cheapest price?" but "why isn't it made in the USA?!?"

This may all be interpreted as political and I have no desire to start anything. I'm just saying I really wanted a green sparkle set of Ludwigs made in the USA. However, for my use, I cannot justify the cost. Do I understand the cost has to be what it is? Yes, I do. Do I understand Ludwig has employees who are trying to make a living also? Yes, I do. But I cannot "afford" to pay that for what I "want". Do I expect them to make me set in USA for the same price that an import set sells for just because I "want to buy American"? No, I do not. So, if I am not willing to pay the price for what I want, then I have to make another choice. That is on me. Either I save and sacrifice on something else to fulfill a "want" or I pay within my means for what I "need".

Sorry to hi jack.

To answer the OP question:
I wish green sparkle wrap finishes were available on lower level kits.
I wish there could be greater size variety in lower level kits.
But I understand those things would increase cost due to more SKUs and more production and more stock and then lower level kits would become mid-level or upper tier kits in sales price.

I also wish I were not so wordy, but nothing any drum company can do about that :)
 

premier72

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I wish Premier would make kits that look like the 60s/70s ones. Wonder if they have anything planned this year for their centennial?
 

wikkid1

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I wish INDe drums would offer endorsement deals. I’m very happy with my kit and try to pimp it whenever possible but it’d be nice to grab a second kit from them at a decent discount, say 30-40% off.
 

Thebstar

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I own a set of DW Collectors Series Maple shells. I have played Tama my whole professional career and still own three Tama kits as well including a Japanese made StarClassic birch kit with die cast hoops and lugs. I cannot tell you how I much I love die cast. Mainly because it’s a quality hardware that makes tuning more precise—those high end D-dubs sound amazing, are made in Oxnard, each shell is timber tuned, BUT they don’t have die cast hoops and rims. It’s the ONLY thing that bugs me.
I ordered mine with die-cast in 2007. And Camco style t-rods too! With Ambassadors, they sound fantastic. Had to ditch the DW factory heads
 

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Thebstar

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I wish Gretsch would correctly place the round badge on the vintage build rack tom’s. Move it one panel over away from the mount where it should be. Looks like it’s cross eyed.
 

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esooy

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@esooy I wonder at times if the US buying public realizes the role they (we) play in all of this? Most demand things to be cheap (inexpensive) and think only of that. My opinion for decades has been that everyone wants to be a millionaire but pay Walmart prices for stuff. That cannot work. Someone has to work at Walmart and make the Walmart wage. I used to do some hobby woodworking and on the woodworking forums guys would always be "all this crap is made in China!!!" when referring to the tools then in the next breath would be "where can I get so and so for the cheapest price?" but "why isn't it made in the USA?!?"

This may all be interpreted as political and I have no desire to start anything. I'm just saying I really wanted a green sparkle set of Ludwigs made in the USA. However, for my use, I cannot justify the cost. Do I understand the cost has to be what it is? Yes, I do. Do I understand Ludwig has employees who are trying to make a living also? Yes, I do. But I cannot "afford" to pay that for what I "want". Do I expect them to make me set in USA for the same price that an import set sells for just because I "want to buy American"? No, I do not. So, if I am not willing to pay the price for what I want, then I have to make another choice. That is on me. Either I save and sacrifice on something else to fulfill a "want" or I pay within my means for what I "need".

Sorry to hi jack.

To answer the OP question:
I wish green sparkle wrap finishes were available on lower level kits.
I wish there could be greater size variety in lower level kits.
But I understand those things would increase cost due to more SKUs and more production and more stock and then lower level kits would become mid-level or upper tier kits in sales price.

I also wish I were not so wordy, but nothing any drum company can do about that :)
@xtranoise I thank you for your input and I think all of what you said makes sense and is understandable. It’s a complicated issue with many different facets.
 

markkarj

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Love Pearl, but loathe their tom mounts. ..
Agreed... Inasmuch as I liked the "industrial strength" vibe of the Pearl mounts in my early days, Yamaha seems to offer a much more elegant solution.

I was surprised to hear how many of Pearl's late 80s/early 90s lugs were breaking as well. I guess industrial strength doesn't mean quality.
 

The Real Drummer Dude

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I ordered mine with die-cast in 2007. And Camco style t-rods too! With Ambassadors, they sound fantastic. Had to ditch the DW factory heads
A mate had three D-dubs given to him — he’s in a major label band and an endorser — and was preparing to hit the road in support of their latest effort. When the pandemic stabbed the music business to death, we all got reamed, but he had nothing coming in. He knew I loved those Collectors series shells, and their big shells — perfect for my main band — and since he needed the bread, he sold them for a great price. I was planning on ordering the die cast with a new kit, but this worked out well.

The sound guys I work with all rave about these D-dubs — so do most of the drummers in the acts who open for us and use my kit — many say it’s the best sounding kit they’ve worked with. The DCH is a nit-picky thing, I live them, but only us drummers would understand. Lol.

As far as heads go, I’m an Aquarian guy with the kick batter, and ringy Remos on the tom batter side shells. I love drums that sing, no tape, gel or muffle for me. Old school, Remos get me there.
 
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DavedrumsTX

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Most of tbose were (outer) mahogany/poplar/maple ( the wrapped ones). Legacy gives you a choice of maple/poplar or mahogany/poplar but not the mix of the two. Maybe that's the difference. No big scarf joint on the Legacys (or the hump that sometimes resulted). That's another difference.
Yes. I’ve restored quite a few 60s and 70s Ludwig drums. 60s shells were generally mahogany, poplar, mahogany. Early to mid 70s were mahogany, poplar, maple. I believe the Legacy’s are constructed more soundly and consistently than the old ones, but I love the sound of the older ones. Perhaps it’s all in my head?
 


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