Mystery MIJ Snare

lanebune

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Yes I know it's a stencil, but I've never seen one like this. (Not that I'm an expert in MIJ drums)

I'm just wondering if anyone has seen one like this and may know what year it would be from approximately. I can't find GHI anywhere on line. you do see "Worlds Supreme Quility" on lots of stencil kits.

This one has a very heavy duty throw off/strainer that I've never seen on a MIJ drum, but it is definitely original to the drum. The long rods with the flat ends are new to me too.
 

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rock roll

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i have what must be a stencil kit but an early one. it has the same throw.but what look like leedy lugs.but not exactly.
i will take pics and upload when i can.
 

idrum4fun

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To my knowledge, all the badges with "World's Supreme Quality" were made by Star (Hoshino). That throw-off is a copy of the "Universal" throw-off used by Rogers in the 50's and part of the 60's. The lugs on your drum are the "Midget" center lug, and installed on drums for a lower price point. I've got a few MIJ snare drums with this strainer and "World's Supreme Quality" badges. As to "GHI", it was most likely an abbreviation of the name of the importers business or personal name!

-Mark
 

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drumtimejohn

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To my knowledge, all the badges with "World's Supreme Quality" were made by Star (Hoshino). That throw-off is a copy of the "Universal" throw-off used by Rogers in the 50's and part of the 60's. The lugs on your drum are the "Midget" center lug, and installed on drums for a lower price point. I've got a few MIJ snare drums with this strainer and "World's Supreme Quality" badges. As to "GHI", it was most likely and abbreviation of the name of the importers business or personal name!

-Mark
Hoshino Gakki but not to be confused with the “Hoshino” brand of drums. Does that sound right?
 

lanebune

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To my knowledge, all the badges with "World's Supreme Quality" were made by Star (Hoshino). That throw-off is a copy of the "Universal" throw-off used by Rogers in the 50's and part of the 60's. The lugs on your drum are the "Midget" center lug, and installed on drums for a lower price point. I've got a few MIJ snare drums with this strainer and "World's Supreme Quality" badges. As to "GHI", it was most likely and abbreviation of the name of the importers business or personal name!

-Mark
Thanks Mark, that really cleans up my questions. Now if I can find 4 of the rods that are missing I could finish it up, although it would most likely cost more for the rods than the drum cost me, or is even worth.

Lane
 

idrum4fun

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Hoshino Gakki but not to be confused with the “Hoshino” brand of drums. Does that sound right?
I believe you are correct. To add confusion to the mix, were Star drums, like the one I pictured, made by Hoshino Gakki, or just Hoshino? This can get so darn confusing!

-Mark
 

idrum4fun

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Thanks Mark, that really cleans up my questions. Now if I can find 4 of the rods that are missing I could finish it up, although it would most likely cost more for the rods than the drum cost me, or is even worth.

Lane
Hi Lane! Those rods may be like finding a needle in a haystack! What's the hole spacing for those brackets? If they are standard 2" or 2.25", you might be able to get hold of some vintage Slingerland-style lugs and install them.

-Mark
 

lanebune

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Hi Lane! Those rods may be like finding a needle in a haystack! What's the hole spacing for those brackets? If they are standard 2" or 2.25", you might be able to get hold of some vintage Slingerland-style lugs and install them.

-Mark
Great idea, but it looks like the actual hole spacing is 1 1/4. I think you're right about trying to find any. This project might be sitting on the shelf for a while.
 

drumtimejohn

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I believe you are correct. To add confusion to the mix, were Star drums, like the one I pictured, made by Hoshino Gakki, or just Hoshino? This can get so darn confusing!

-Mark
Yes, I believe H. Gakki is Star and of course later becomes Tama. I’m not really sure where the “Hoshino” brand fits in just read somewhere they were in fact different.
 

lanebune

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What length tension rods do you need.?
Yes rock roll, Snare is all I have. I need 4, 6 inch tension rods as pictured above to complete the snare. I have the rims that came with it and the butt plate and throw.
 

rock roll

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... Here is some mij info I found online...
In the early to mid '60s, amidst the growing popularity of rock music and the onset of the British Invasion, Ludwig and other drum companies such as Slingerland and Rogers could barely keep up with the demand for drum sets. While Ludwig certainly had the edge over the rest of the marketplace due to their association with Ringo and The Beatles, this boom in rock music affected every drum company.
In turn, this gave emerging Japanese companies like Pearl, Yamaha, and Hoshino (later known as Tama), the opportunity to look overseas to see how they could profit from this rise in the demand for drums.
It was common practice in many musical instrument factories to produce multiple lines that were aesthetically similar but had different brands associated with them.
Though Pearl and Yamaha were already beginning to produce some fairly high-quality drums in the late '60s, they wouldn't become known for high-quality, reliable drums until the late '70s and early '80s (the golden age of "MIJ" drums, to many).
But American importers saw an opportunity in the mid '60s to partner with these overseas companies and bring kits and snares into the U.S. that had the look and feel of American drums, without the hefty price tag. These were often sold in department stores, such as Montgomery Wards or Sears, or as entry-level alternatives in well-established drum shops.
Carving a Place in the Drum Market
There were a number of different badges and "brands" that could be associated with these sets, including Apollo, Lyra, Lido, Stewart, Zim-Gar, and Whitehall, as well as the aforementioned names. Many of these drums had the same lugs and hardware and were most likely made in the same factory. Exactly where they were produced and through which major company is impossible to tell.
One common factor among all these sets was the use of Luan mahogany wood to make the shells, most commonly with a vertical grain. Luan Mahogany, also known as Phillipine Mahogany, was cheap and easy to build with. Some drums would have reinforcement rings on the top and bottom of the shell. Others would have one running across the middle, and others would have none at all.
Many size configurations mirrored those of American drums, and their finishes were designed to copy the popular sparkle and swirl-based wraps of American drums. The materials and patterns used for these wraps, however, weren't always obtained from the same sources as American companies. This made for some unique finishes that have yet to be duplicated or featured on any other drums to this day.

Stencil' comes from the fact that most of the drums were made in the same factories but were given different brand names for importing to different stores. Store 'A' would get 'Kent', store 'B' might get 'Royce' and store 'C' but get 'Maxwin'. The shells were usually identical and there may be one or two hardware changes but otherwise they were exactly the same kit.
Most/all were made in one of two factories: one of which became Pearl and other eventually became Tama.
But that said, despite the two competing factories, the drums that came out of them were near identical as they both used the same shells, and the same pot metal lugs, usually a knock-off of the then Slingerland design, and the same wraps.
And they were sold under 100's of different brand names.
So we just call them stencil kits, as it's easier than trying to figure out the exact brand name a given kit is, given the brand name actually has no bearing on on the material/quality/price of said drum set.

Also,
Turns out that MuraiYama, Negi drums, and Gracy drum company (along with Pearl ofcourse) were all making drums in the 1950s. MuraiYama drums are quite rare and go for a good chunk of change.
 

rock roll

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Lanebune,
I just looked on eBay , there is 5 short pearl Jupiter snare tension rods from the 70's.
Asking price was 18.00.
They look like they may work.
You can message seller about actual size.
Let me know if you have trouble finding it. I saved the page.
 

lanebune

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Lanebune,
I just looked on eBay , there is 5 short pearl Jupiter snare tension rods from the 70's.
Asking price was 18.00.
They look like they may work.
You can message seller about actual size.
Let me know if you have trouble finding it. I saved the page.
I have the butt, hoops, throw. Everything but these dang rods and like Mark said they may be like looking for a needle in a haystack! Thanks for all the info you sent. Very interesting.
 

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