Need recommendation for head phone or in-ear monitors

lrod1707

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Sometimes there is a period of getting used to IEM’s. I came from using etymotic in ears, so after those, anything else seems like there’s almost noting in your ears. Also, as a drummer wearing earplugs for many years, the fit for IEM’s feels familiar to me.

Jerry Harvey, who was an early pioneer in the IEM market, got out of the music industry and made pilot’s IEM’s for a while. Now he’s back making IEM’s for musicians and audiophiles...
Cool! I'm gonna read about him. The reason nobody uses the IEM's in the cockpit is because a cockpit is relatively quiet so your not really isolating much, unless your flying loud equipment and even then we have noise cancelling headsets for those applications. I guess I'm just really used to over the ear from so many years of use. I will give the IEM's another chance though. Thanks!
LRod
 

lrod1707

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Sometimes there is a period of getting used to IEM’s. I came from using etymotic in ears, so after those, anything else seems like there’s almost noting in your ears. Also, as a drummer wearing earplugs for many years, the fit for IEM’s feels familiar to me.

Jerry Harvey, who was an early pioneer in the IEM market, got out of the music industry and made pilot’s IEM’s for a while. Now he’s back making IEM’s for musicians and audiophiles...
Your not gonna believe this. I just looked him up to read about him. I've never heard of the guy and his building and office is like 5 minutes away from my office. That's hilarious! Might stop by when I can to check out what they do.
 

Johnny K

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Been using the same 2 pairs of ZST's since Rob 'Beatdown' Brown posted his first video about them. So probably almost 10 months now give or take a couple weeks. I use them all the time, ie I sleep with them listening to music oR podcasts as well as IEM's when I play, so both pairs have hundreds of hours on them.

Some observations:

The supplied tips are terrible. Get the Comfy tips. Good on the mfg for selling them by the size so I don't have to waste money on sizes i'll never use.
The sound quality is terrific. After hundreds of hours, they still sound great.
Much like you tape your mic cables to your mics, you need to tape the cords to the buds. They will come detached while playing the drums. It will also keep sweat and dirt out of the connection.
I a bought a set of silver plated replacement cords with the mic delete. Maybe they're better, cant really tell.

FWIW, I still sometime use over ear headphone when I make recording. Sometime I don't want something in my ear.

My only gripe is the cables are too short. But I have a couple of extensions, so problem solved.
 

Johnny K

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Cool! I'm gonna read about him. The reason nobody uses the IEM's in the cockpit is because a cockpit is relatively quiet so your not really isolating much, unless your flying loud equipment and even then we have noise cancelling headsets for those applications. I guess I'm just really used to over the ear from so many years of use. I will give the IEM's another chance though. Thanks!
LRod
I used to own a dry clutch Ducati. I wore IEM's or ear plugs when I rode, but not at first. Rider fatigue from loud noises is a real thing. My comfort level when way up once I started to wear hearing protection.
 

lrod1707

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Been using the same 2 pairs of ZST's since Rob 'Beatdown' Brown posted his first video about them. So probably almost 10 months now give or take a couple weeks. I use them all the time, ie I sleep with them listening to music oR podcasts as well as IEM's when I play, so both pairs have hundreds of hours on them.

Some observations:

The supplied tips are terrible. Get the Comfy tips. Good on the mfg for selling them by the size so I don't have to waste money on sizes i'll never use.
The sound quality is terrific. After hundreds of hours, they still sound great.
Much like you tape your mic cables to your mics, you need to tape the cords to the buds. They will come detached while playing the drums. It will also keep sweat and dirt out of the connection.
I a bought a set of silver plated replacement cords with the mic delete. Maybe they're better, cant really tell.

FWIW, I still sometime use over ear headphone when I make recording. Sometime I don't want something in my ear.

My only gripe is the cables are too short. But I have a couple of extensions, so problem solved.
The sound is great, I do admit that. I saw the issue with the cable. It's really short and not practical when playing my kit. But the idea of a cable extension is good.
 

CAMDRUMS

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Here’s a new review of the KZ zS10-pro by Digital Drummer, in case anyone is interested:

So much bang for your buck
Monday, 26 August 2019 3:56 pm
There’s been a lot of hype about low-cost Chinese in-ear brand KZ, so digitalDrummer checked out the ZS10-PRO model.
The KZ ZS10-PRO in-ears are attracting a lot of interest from audiophiles and musicians alike, prompted mostly by the bang-for-buck promise – five drivers on each side for less than $40.
At that price point, the in-ears virtually sell themselves, and KZ doesn’t have to do any marketing at all.
What’s in the box?
In a market which is becoming increasingly sophisticated, KZ has not gone to any trouble. The in-ears are represented in a simple cardboard box containing a clear plastic display pack. There, we find the two in-ear units, a cable and four spare silicon tips.
There’s no carry case, no cleaning tool, no ¼” adapter. In short, there are no frills with these guys.
The focus is clearly on the base product – a pair of solid-feeling in-ears, each featuring five drivers. In each shell, made of metal on one side and clear-coloured plastic on the other, are four balanced armature drivers and one dynamic driver, putting the ZS10-PROs into the company of products costing more than 10 times more.
The cable, measuring 1.25 m, is a pro-looking twisted pair, housed in a clear covering and ending in a basic 1/8” right-angle jack.
In action
The first step is to connect the cable to the two-pin connectors. While the illustrations show a large L and R signifying left and right, in reality, it is very hard to see those on the clear plastic connector.
The shell of the in-ear is quite large, so initial fitting takes a bit of jiggling around. Unfortunately, I couldn’t get a comfortable fit with any of the three tip choices and had to raid my supply cupboard for a soft foam tip from another pair of in-ears (these take the same tips as AKG, JBL, Ultimate Ears and some other models). I’m a big fan of triple flange tips, but couldn’t readily locate any that fit the KZ.
The fit with the foam tips was fine – not great, but it was good enough to ensure a decent level of isolation.
Sounds like …
Plugged into a drum module, the first striking feature of the ZS10-PRO is the volume. Rated at 30 Ohm, these in-ears deliver tons of grunt and I had to dial my reference module, the Roland TD-30, back to 9 o’clock.
Most of the grunt is at the low end, with these in-ears delivering plenty of bass – almost a barrage of bass. While there was plenty of low end, bass notes seemed quite cold and stark, rather than warm and resonant.
Mid-range is sometimes lacking in in-ears, but here, the ZS10 was a good performer, with solid mid tones especially on the toms.
If there’s one weakness, it’s probably the treble reproduction. While I certainly heard all the cymbal tones, they lacked the tingle that I have enjoyed with many in-ears, even the single-driver Etymoic ER4.
But overall, the sound was impressive – immersive, latency-free and without gaps. The soundscape is well suited to e-drums, with a frequency response of 7 Hz to 40 kHz. That performance is more than adequate for the full band sound if you are using the in-ears instead for stage monitoring.
Bottom line
In-ears take some getting used to, especially for anyone who has spent years listening to over-the-ear headphones. For anyone looking for their first pair of in-ears, the ZS10 is a great starting point.
But even seasoned musicians will be impressed with the sheer grunt of these in-ears.
The price point makes them a no-brainer – either as back-up for your more expensive in-ears or as an experiment. It could well be that the shell shape and the supplied tips work perfectly for your ear. Spending another $10 on aftermarket tips like those from Comply will still not break the bank – and may deliver a workable solution for any gigging drummer.
KZ is only available online, so there are no options for listening or looking before purchase, which is probably another reason for the low price.
I was sceptical before trying them, but after using them for a while – in the middle of testing in-ears costing way more – I certainly recognise the value for money in the ZS10 PRO. So much so that I will continue my hunt for some triple flange tips
 

amazish

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Update

I have been using the ZS10PRO and KZ's "sister" company parallel model the CCA C10 for several months - they have the same driver configuration - but different tuning.
Currently prefer the CCA C10. They tilt slightly towards the treble. They have a slightly flatter sound signature. And to me less boomy and tiring than the ZS10PRO. And its a good thing. Bass drum and bass guitar come across clearer and less tiring by the end of the gig. They are similar in sound... for their price l would get both and switch them to personal liking, one will be a back up.
Currently prefer these over the more expensive FIIO. Though l'm sure their top IEMs are better. Not sure there's a point to spend so much for a gig IEM. For home... different story...
I Recommend getting a better cable. Here are some useful links, and wait until November's "singles day" because prices will come down substantially. Good luck:
CCA C10

Cable

Triple flange tips for those who like these

Regular large tips [l prefer these]

ZS10PRO


Newer models at the same prices came out but l believe they are less neutral

 
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amazish

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Nobody has explained what any of this is:
Hybrid?
Armature?
Drive (dual, single)?
Balanced?
:(
Balanced armature is a sound transducer, a kind of speaker that works with a tiny metal plate to create the sound waves.
Dynamic drivers work like large speakers but on a small scale. A cone/diaphragm and a voice coil and a magnet.
Some earphones have more than one of each kind of driver thus called hybrids. There are many more kinds of drivers.... but these are the 2 main kinds. Some in ear monitors have a single driver, some have 2, 3 or even 12... And with more than one driver there is usually a crossover network to allocate frequency ranges between the respectful driver units. The market is now flooded with great sounding IEMs at all price points.
 
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