Nesting drums

MrYikes

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I would like to hear your thoughts on an idea I have. I am too old to make several trips to get a kit into a venue. I need to make one trip. I am thinking about "nesting" several drums into each other and using a two wheel cart to carry them in. That would mean that I would not be using resonant heads. I would want something to hold the drums off the bottom of the batter heads to protect them. If the lack of tone forced it, I could carry a battery powered drill to re-attach the resonant heads, but that seems a lot of wasted time.
I would appreciate your thought/ideas concerning this.
 

pwc1141

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I have seen some nesting kits but never had one. What I did have was a Taye Go-kit that came in two bags. The snare and three shallow toms fitted into one long (deep) bag and the bass drum in the other. A soft pad separated each drum from the next. Depending on your set up you could get a bag made that fits at least, snare, floor tom and one rack tom saving some carry issues. My issue is not my 4 piece so much as my hardware case which gets heavier each gig in perception and I can hardly lift it into my SUV.
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MrYikes

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Thanks. I made a bag for my cocktail kit that works well for me. But I want a full kit, at least 5 piece, also. I just can't carry the Rogers anymore. I have seen your pics of the Taye and that was a sweet kit.
 

Ptrick

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Yes, precision made my nesting kit (the first one they ever made). Been going on 20 years of constant use with no issues. Sounds exactly like a regular kit, and the one trip in/out, and the small amount of space it takes up when touring has been AMAZING.

They could either make one for you, or split your existing bass drum and floor Tom with hinges, depending on the sizes of the drums. 3” separation between drums works best. If they are going inside of each other.

I have two nesting kits, the sizes are 18x18, 6x12, 9x14 on the jazz kit (12/14 stack inside bass drum), and a 20x20 kick with 6x10, 6x12, and 11x15 floor Tom. The the 10” Tom nest into the 15” tom, then the 12/15 (with the 10 inside of the 15) stack on top of each other inside the 20” kick.

Yes, you make sacrifices on drum shell depth. I can tell you NOBODY HAS EVER noticed a sound difference live. The toms are a little quicker feeling overall, but still sound plenty big.

Here’s a pic of when they were first built and a gig pics. The 18” kit has wood hoops on the toms.

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AaronLatos

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I have a precision style 10/13/16 kit (plus a 12 that doesn't nest) I built from Ludwig Rockers that has seen hundreds if not thousands of gigs. Sounds fabulous.

Also owned a Whitney Penguin in the same sizes that I sold the day after I bought it to a good friend who needed it for a tour. Really great drums, very underrated.

My advice is that if you can get the money together for a proper nesting kit with bottom heads, do it.

I plan on building or commissioning an 8x12, 12x15 toms , option of 13x18 and 13x20 kicks kit at some point.
 

CAMDRUMS

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I think Twin Cities Drum Collective makes a single-headed with this in mind.
 

kb

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The problem with nesting kits is weight. Sure, you're saving on space and number of items, but now you've got one really heavy large bulky item to transport; especially if you're trying to do it with a five piece.

Another potential problem, at least for me, is if you're using a floor tom that's shallow enough to fit inside the bass drum, that means you have to take the legs off. So, now you're increasing the weigh of your hardware case.....

As I get older, I'm trying to make things lighter, even if that means more separate items....
 

A.TomicMorganic

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If I ever have the chance to buy Whitney nesting penguins I might just do that.
 

rondrums51

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That's ingenious. Really impressive. But I can see that the one case for those drums is going to be a heavy son of a gun. Wouldn't work for me.

Precision makes fantastic stuff. I've done business with them since the 1970's. They built me a custom snare that is just amazing. But they're expensive. I guess you get what you pay for.
 

rondrums51

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That's exactly the way I stack my drums on my Rock n Roller, except I don't use drum cases because I hate them. I strap my hardware bag to the end just like you do. Works great. But it doesn't change the fact that drums are a pain in the ass, and I should have been a flute player.
 

rculberson

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That's exactly the way I stack my drums on my Rock n Roller, except I don't use drum cases because I hate them. I strap my hardware bag to the end just like you do. Works great. But it doesn't change the fact that drums are a pain in the ass, and I should have been a flute player.
The only movement of the load in/load out process that is somewhat physically challenging is lifting the hardware case into my vehicle. It’s during that 3 seconds that I say the same thing to myself, Ron!
 

egw

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There seem to be two general types of nesting kits: the Hipgig type, where the bass drum is really long and the toms stack up inside it, and the Drummer's World style, where the drums are all fairly standard dimensions and the little ones go inside the bigger ones.

And yes, 3" difference is the key for the Drummer's World type. 10/13/16, 12/15/18 (and sometimes 12/16/20) seem to be popular configurations. Also, you don't want to go less than 2" difference in height (for example a 12x13" FT inside a 13x16" BD) because the height of the hoops will keep the larger drum from closing.

I built an 8x10, 11x13, 13x16 set 20
years ago that I used to drag all around Manhattan, on the subway and what not. Paid for itself 100 times over. I have a similar one currently, though the FT doesn't open (I have to remove the bottom head each time), so it's not truly nesting.

If your BD is 12x16 or 13x16", you can actually fit a 5x14 snare inside a 16x16" case with it as well. If you really want to push it, you can also fit most of your hardware in there too, though that causes balance problems if you're using a cart. It's balanced better with some of the weight up towards the top.

And if you really want to get fancy, you could could make foam disks to go on top and bottom of each of the drums to keep them from bumping around inside each other, though I never went that far. Simple drawstring cloth bags seem to suffice.
 

paul

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The only movement of the load in/load out process that is somewhat physically challenging is lifting the hardware case into my vehicle. It’s during that 3 seconds that I say the same thing to myself, Ron!
Whenever a hardware bag gets too heavy I split it into two bags. My rack tubing goes into one bag, and the mounts in a second. This also facilitates having three separate mount bags for different setups on a single rack. Hihat stand, throne, and snare stand all go in a common bag. I can pick up any of the bags with one hand, although the common bag is a stretch sometimes. For the record, my 72nd birthday is next week, and I'm not particularly strong, so lifting the large bags onto the cart or into the car can be tough sometimes, but so far, so good.
 

trixonian

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I've been collecting for a long time and enjoy getting to rotate my kits. But my oldness and laziness is kicking in, and I find myself favoring two small kits over the others.

I have a Yamaha HipGig where all the drums nest in the bass and all the hardware in a canister throne. As noted above, it is heavy. On the plus side, it sets up in a jiffy and the bass drum sounds amazing. Also, everything is mic'd so I don't need big drums to move more air.

The other kit is a PDP New Yorker. I tried it at PASIC two years ago and was impressed by how much low end was produced relative to the size (18, 14, 10 with a 13" snare). While it is not a nesting kit, all of the drums fit into two bags. It also comes with DW ultralight hardware, which fits into another bag. (It packs up the same as the Taye Go-kit pictured above.) Everything is light, it's quite portable and it all sounds good.

I would love to have a Whitney Penguin. I've only heard good things about the sound, and ease of use. The drums are extremely light, even when nested. And the unique hardware design requires the least fiddling in terms of setup/teardown.

Yamaha HipGig.jpg
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