New craigslist scam I've not seen before

komodobob

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Haven't sold on craigslist in quite a while, but decided to get rid of a golf cart I have. Put it on craigslist and I've been inundated with requests to send me 6 digit code that I type in for verification that I"M not a scammer...what?
OK, so how exactly does the scam work?
 

owr

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Are you sure it’s a scam? Are the requests from Craigslist as a pre requisite to put up the listing? Sounds like simple 2 factor authentication which is becoming the standard online.
 

lrod1707

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Good to know they do this now because I haven't sold on CL in a while. I would have questioned it as well. Good call posting this Komodobob!
 

komodobob

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Are you sure it’s a scam? Are the requests from Craigslist as a pre requisite to put up the listing? Sounds like simple 2 factor authentication which is becoming the standard online.
I guess the other red flag is the way they typed the message. If it was spoken, it would be considered very poor English. And the texts (5 or 6) requesting this, were pretty much written the same way. Even the area codes were from all over the country. Seriously, why would someone from California want to buy a well used, $2000 golf cart from a guy in NY?
 

lrod1707

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I guess the other red flag is the way they typed the message. If it was spoken, it would be considered very poor English. And the texts (5 or 6) requesting this, were pretty much written the same way. Even the area codes were from all over the country. Seriously, why would someone from California want to buy a well used, $2000 golf cart from a guy in NY?
I was understanding that the verification thing was coming from CL. But from what you now posted, it seems like you are getting several of them as if they are buyers interested in your golf cart. Yes, definitely a scam. Who knows how it works and what it leads to. I'd just ignore it and wait for a legitimate buyer. When I've posted on CL, I have gotten messages from people who are supposedly in other states as well and they do the typical: I will offer you more, I can pay you with a money order from wherever, I'm buying it for a friend, I'm an American living overseas bla bla bla...Etc.., and they always write in crappy poor written English!
 

bellbrass

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Actually, I recently listed a car for sale. Within an hour, I got a grammatically correct email from a scammer, stating that he was a soldier stationed in Arizona, and that he needed to purchase my car for his father, and could he send his best friend to pick it up, because he was being deployed soon......they are really getting clever these days.
The key indication that it's s scam is that the message is insistent and not at all what you would expect to hear from a potential buyer. When I list drums on eBay, I either get no response, or a legitimate offer or question about the condition. The offer is never what I'm asking, and the question is always specific. When I get emails about my "item" or questions about the "full price", I ignore them.

It's amazing how many thieves are out there.
 

owr

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Yeah, does sound sketch. Often they are just trying to confuse you and/or freak you out with the end goal being that you click on some link that will install malicious software on your computer. If it’s texts, not quite sure what that’s about. Best to ignore/delete.

They got my dad a few years back. He is quite tech savvy and usually good at recognizing this sort of thing. He had just gotten home from fed-ex after overnighting closing documents for selling his old house. Checked his email, and saw something from “fed-ex” informing him there was a problem with his package. He freaked, clicked the link, next thing he knew computer was taken over and messages informed him to pay a ransom in the $1000s in bitcoin to get back control. For weeks he was convinced Fed Ex was hacked and that’s how they knew to target him. It’s much simpler, they just send millions of these knowing that some small percent of folks will just have serendipitous timing and bad luck. Lucky for him there was nothing on that computer he hadn’t backed up elsewhere, so he just wiped it and started over.
 

Rich K.

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Maybe it's just me, but lately, other than the scams, I'm getting very little response from craigslist. The Facebook marketplace has replaced it.
 

komodobob

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Maybe it's just me, but lately, other than the scams, I'm getting very little response from craigslist. The Facebook marketplace has replaced it.
Well the golf cart sold and it was to someone who saw it on Facebook.
 

cashmanbashman

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Yeah, does sound sketch. Often they are just trying to confuse you and/or freak you out with the end goal being that you click on some link that will install malicious software on your computer. If it’s texts, not quite sure what that’s about. Best to ignore/delete.

They got my dad a few years back. He is quite tech savvy and usually good at recognizing this sort of thing. He had just gotten home from fed-ex after overnighting closing documents for selling his old house. Checked his email, and saw something from “fed-ex” informing him there was a problem with his package. He freaked, clicked the link, next thing he knew computer was taken over and messages informed him to pay a ransom in the $1000s in bitcoin to get back control. For weeks he was convinced Fed Ex was hacked and that’s how they knew to target him. It’s much simpler, they just send millions of these knowing that some small percent of folks will just have serendipitous timing and bad luck. Lucky for him there was nothing on that computer he hadn’t backed up elsewhere, so he just wiped it and started over.
Fed Ex did get hacked for 1 full day last year. The hacker was asking for bitcoin and in return the hacker would give control back to Fed Ex.
 
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