New Drums

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Again looking for experienced advice, I am considering a set of new drums, lacquered not wrap, and there as some really good famous names out there like Ludwig, Sonor, Gretsch, Tama, Mapex, DW ..... etc, etc. I have a bit of money to invest but am looking for those in the know that could advise where best to spend my money?
 

pedro navahas

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I’m going to be ordering a Ludwig classic maple kit in downbeat sizes, in either a sable or bronze mist, both lacquer finishes.
There are some threads on here about them, you can customize the bearing edges, and the price is reasonable.
Pretty much all I have are vintage drums save for a couple modern snares, looking for a more modern sound for gigs when they start coming back.
 

JimmySticks

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These days the choices for good, even great drums, is nearly endless. It can be daunting.

But maybe you can break it down to what style of music you'll be playing, like I wouldn't go with Canopus for rock or Ludwig for jazz. What wood do you want the shells to be made of? Maple, birch etc. all give different sounds. What size shells do you want? American made or foreign? Which brand, if any, speaks to you? How much do you actually want to spend?

I think if you ask yourself some of these questions, it might help you narrow things down a bit.
 
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NobleCooleyNut

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You need to set some parameters for yourself to make a decision that will narrow down the search .
1) What size drums do you want? - some manufacturers may kit make your sizes
2) What shell material do you want ?
3) What style of music do you play ?
4) Finish selection - do they make a lacquer finish in one that you love ?
5) Once you have your selection narrowed down - watch as many YouTube reviews and read as many reviews as you can .
6) Try to play the drums in person and inspect them in person .

It is fine to reach out to the forum to help you get some suggestions and potentially narrow down your search options . Ultimately you need to make your own decision .
 

lossforgain

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The folks here are giving you great questions to consider. Since there are SO MANY choices, you should use some of these things to narrow down your focus and then we can advise based on our opinions.
 

CherryClassic

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"But maybe you can break it down to what style of music you'll be playing, like I wouldn't go with Canopus for rock or Ludwig for jazz."

Well; I've never heard a statement like that before...maybe so. I'm no expert, the only brands I've ever played are Rogers, old Classic Ludwigs and new CM Ludwigs. I have made statements that you can play any style of music on any drum and maybe I'm wrong. I guess some woods or special edges and sizes may lend them selves more to a style than others. But to me it's the musician that creates the style.

Now days, most companies have a top quality drum at the top of their lines. I'll just say you can't go wrong with Ludwig, only because that's what I like. It would be nice if we could walk into a store and try a good number of brands. I know that's almost impossible for most of us. If you can try any tuned drum, tap on the head and listen to the lingering tone to the end. Listen for quality of tone and the evenness as it fades.

sherm
 

LRod1707

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Again looking for experienced advice, I am considering a set of new drums, lacquered not wrap, and there as some really good famous names out there like Ludwig, Sonor, Gretsch, Tama, Mapex, DW ..... etc, etc. I have a bit of money to invest but am looking for those in the know that could advise where best to spend my money?
Welcome to the forum!
1. What's the limit on "that bit of money" that you have to invest?
2. How many shells do you want?
3. Do you need hardware and/or cymbals as well?
Question #1 is the main factor for determining everything else including the other guidance given here by other members.
 
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Welcome to the forum!
1. What's the limit on "that bit of money" that you have to invest?
2. How many shells do you want?
3. Do you need hardware and/or cymbals as well?
Question #1 is the main factor for determining everything else including the other guidance given here by other members.
I would probably only class myself as an Intermediate player and have only been playing for a couple of years, but this is now my hobby as well as my passion, as I enjoy the look of my drums as well as playing them.
I have a lovely set of Zildjian Custom A’s and a K, with Iron cobra pedals. It’s
only the shells I’m looking to invest in and whilst my CB / Dixon drums are in pretty much mint condition, I have a budget of a couple £K to spend on lacquered shells, something like the Mapex Black Panther in the Walnut Burst or something like the Ludwig Epic in the Sunburst.
Im looking for 6 drums, 22” bass, 16” and 14” floor, possibly (?) 13” and 12” rack with a “matching” 14” snare.
I would need a couple of combined tom/cymbal stands, as my toms are currently bass mounted and think I’d like to separated them in order to eliminate some of the sympathetic harmonics I get.
 

paul

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The short answer, originally stated here by someone else, is "buy the drums you can't wait to play."

As has been noted, the choices for quality drums are nearly limitless. I'm as happy with the sound of my Catalina Maples as with my vintage Gretsch. I wouldn't gig the CMs, though, because I don't think the hardware would stand up under hard use. For my home kit, they're excellent.

Head choice and tuning will have a bigger effect on the sound than what kind of wood they're made of. Ditto for hoops, mounts, etc.

As for musical styles, play appropriately and the drums will sound right. Don't play George Strait tunes like you think John Bonham would, or Green Day in the style of Joe Morello.

Shop around. Something will call out to you.
 

JimmySticks

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"But maybe you can break it down to what style of music you'll be playing, like I wouldn't go with Canopus for rock or Ludwig for jazz."

Well; I've never heard a statement like that before...maybe so. I'm no expert, the only brands I've ever played are Rogers, old Classic Ludwigs and new CM Ludwigs. I have made statements that you can play any style of music on any drum and maybe I'm wrong. I guess some woods or special edges and sizes may lend them selves more to a style than others. But to me it's the musician that creates the style.

Now days, most companies have a top quality drum at the top of their lines. I'll just say you can't go wrong with Ludwig, only because that's what I like. It would be nice if we could walk into a store and try a good number of brands. I know that's almost impossible for most of us. If you can try any tuned drum, tap on the head and listen to the lingering tone to the end. Listen for quality of tone and the evenness as it fades.

sherm
Well, Canopus is known to cater to the jazzers. They are known for their bop kits. It’s not that you can’t rock on them, but that’s not their strength. And Ludwig doesn’t even make a bop sized kit that I know of, so then yeah, I wouldn’t look to Ludwig for a jazz kit.
 

JimmySticks

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Look at Pork Pie Percussion.

They have some gorgeous lacquer finishes in a variety of sizes, and I can attest to their quality, it is top notch all the way. Bill Detamore, the president of the company, has his hands in all of the USA made customs, from painting to edges and everything in between. He signs off on everything that leaves his factory, and if you e mail him, he’ll answer you quickly. Great company, great drums.

porkpiedrums.com
 

RIDDIM

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Well, Canopus is known to cater to the jazzers. They are known for their bop kits. It’s not that you can’t rock on them, but that’s not their strength. And Ludwig doesn’t even make a bop sized kit that I know of, so then yeah, I wouldn’t look to Ludwig for a jazz kit.
 

JimmySticks

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- Canopus is known for great drum builds. They sing like nobody's business - and they make drums that work in rock contexts. Check out their website and catalog.
I was just trying to narrow things down for the OP and I picked out Canopus and Ludwig as examples where you could pick the right instrument for the job. No knock on either.

Would you take a set of Paiste 2002’s to a small jazz gig? Or is there something better? You might make it work, although you’d likely scare the hell out of everyone, but it’s not the best setup. Same with a Ludwig on a small jazz gig. I’ve never seen one because they don’t even make an 18”BD. Best instrument for the job, that’s all I mean.

Sorry for going OT OP!
 

Cauldronics

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Since there are endless options of great drum kits, I'd get the one I recently got and have been very happy with: Gretsch Renown, used or new. I've had about 15 different kits from many different eras and I honestly think they're the best at a modern, clear, punchy sound.

What your looking for isn't exactly a narrow field or application, and I believe almost any mid to high quality kit will suit you. Pick the one that sounds best after hearing the most you can.
 

RIDDIM

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I was just trying to narrow things down for the OP and I picked out Canopus and Ludwig as examples where you could pick the right instrument for the job. No knock on either.


Sorry for going OT OP!
Would you take a set of Paiste 2002’s to a small jazz gig?

- Been there, done that. Got called back.

- So did this guy:

Or is there something better?

You might make it work, although you’d likely scare the hell out of everyone, but it’s not the best setup. Same with a Ludwig on a small jazz gig. I’ve never seen one because they don’t even make an 18”BD.

- Roy Haynes did pretty well with them for years. So did Alan Dawson and Max Roach.

Best instrument for the job, that’s all I mean.

- I'm cool with that idea; my point was not to rule out Canopus, especially if you have not researched what they can do.
 


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