New Gretsch kit blended with old?

russgold

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I'm a long time Yamaha player and I'm going back to my roots. I had a Gretsch kit in college that got stolen ('79 stop sign) and I'm finally going to replace them with USA customs. Very psyched.
Here's the complicated part... I have 2 drums left from my old stolen kit: a 9x13 and 16x16. I want to end up with 12, 13, 14, 16, 20.
Originally I thought I'd have Gretsch match the old finish with some new tubs to complete a combined set. But NOW...looking at the new stuff I'm falling in love with the Dark Walnut Gloss... OR Antique Maple gloss.
Will the new drums sound significantly different than the old? (Probably) Should I just sell the old gear (*sniff*)? Maybe refinish the old to match the new?
Advise please!
Russ
 

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lawsater

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I have SSB 13-14-16-22 that was made around 1980 in walnut gloss I added a 12 in the 80s and a 10 in the 90s the color is very close but obviously there is some slight fading in the older drums but not really noticeable. Sound wise they blend well you would not be able to tell they were made in different decades but others may have different experiences than me. If you can afford it a new kit would be the less problematic and from what I have seen Gretsch are producing great quality drums and the finishes look excellent its a hard one not sure I would want to part with the old shells.
 

Deafmoon

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You can add them sure; but the bearing edges are probably changed from yesteryear. They should be much sharper today. May sound a bit different. I think the shell thickness is the same at 5mm though for USA. I think the overseas stuff is 7mm thickness so don't go there.
 

ConvertedLudwigPlayer

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Personally, I would order all new drums and sell or hang onto the others for sentimental reasons as you have done. Or sell the old to help fund the new. Likely your original drums have faded, hardware and hoops have pitted, etc. No reason to mix and match, IMO.
 

RIDDIM

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I'm a long time Yamaha player and I'm going back to my roots. I had a Gretsch kit in college that got stolen ('79 stop sign) and I'm finally going to replace them with USA customs. Very psyched.
Here's the complicated part... I have 2 drums left from my old stolen kit: a 9x13 and 16x16. I want to end up with 12, 13, 14, 16, 20.
Originally I thought I'd have Gretsch match the old finish with some new tubs to complete a combined set. But NOW...looking at the new stuff I'm falling in love with the Dark Walnut Gloss... OR Antique Maple gloss.
Will the new drums sound significantly different than the old? (Probably) Should I just sell the old gear (*sniff*)? Maybe refinish the old to match the new?
Advise please!
Russ
- Ask a cabinet maker what it would cost to strip and refinish them per the new Gretsch finsih. I'd estimate a few hundred per drum. And once you get all the drums together, you'll want to take them to someone with a flat granite table who wil verify all edges are good. You'll also want to make sure al the edges are consistent.
 

paul

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Back in 2000 I went on a project to build a set of Gretsch, buying single drums from various internet sources. I have seven toms of various ages and badges, including round, square, and stop sign badges, and periods from the 50s to the 90s. I did have them all rewrapped, but edges were left alone. I can't hear any difference in the relative timbres of the drums, and still get compliments on their sound.
 

russgold

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Back in 2000 I went on a project to build a set of Gretsch, buying single drums from various internet sources. I have seven toms of various ages and badges, including round, square, and stop sign badges, and periods from the 50s to the 90s. I did have them all rewrapped, but edges were left alone. I can't hear any difference in the relative timbres of the drums, and still get compliments on their sound.
Good insight. Just curious, what kind of music?
 

russgold

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- Ask a cabinet maker what it would cost to strip and refinish them per the new Gretsch finsih. I'd estimate a few hundred per drum. And once you get all the drums together, you'll want to take them to someone with a flat granite table who wil verify all edges are good. You'll also want to make sure al the edges are consistent.
I'm leaning towards this route. Buying a 10, 12, 14, and having a local guy (Who did a beautiful job fixing some drums up to be sold) match the 13 & 16 with new finish.
 


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