New Video My Drumming

notINtheband

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Feel free to file the following suggestion under, ‘advice you didn’t ask for’. So I apologize if it comes across that way.
But if I were able to go back in time and give my first-year self some advice, but with today’s resources, I would implore myself to take this advice.

Next time you are at Guitar center, buy a pair of sticks, a practice pad, and THIS dvd.
48D50CAB-B95A-4C5D-961E-32B68C03050C.jpeg


Trust me, playing along to this will bring your game up quicker than anything outside of a private instructor, maybe more depending…
Best of luck my friend and keep drumming. We all started out as rookies. Good to see that same passion we all shared at the early stage.
 

MetalDoucheRuddfan1223

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I'm self taught gonna keep it Organic my style of Drumming isn't whats on a DVD its whats Organic or what i feel to play!
 

GiveMeYourSmallestSticks!

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I'm self taught gonna keep it Organic my style of Drumming isn't whats on a DVD its whats Organic or what i feel to play!
Here's a bit more advice you didn't ask for, but since you posted here, I'm assuming you're open to it. If not, feel free to ignore me.

I'm self taught too, and have been playing for 30 years. Thing is, self taught implies self-directed learning, and taking the extra initiative to improve on your own by seeking out every opportunity you can get (including learning from other drummers on forums or DVDs). It implies trying to listen critically and objectively to your own playing, and constantly striving to improve. If you simply embrace that what you're playing is "what you feel" and "organic" (and therefore exactly as it should be), at what point will you strive to improve and progress? What you feel and what's organic is based on what you know and your current skill level, and that's an easy way to simply settle on your current skill level as being good enough. I think you'd be surprised to hear just how critical of themselves even seemingly phenomenal drummers can be, and the nitpicking they would do to what you may perceive as a perfect or near perfect performance.

Please don't take this the wrong way, you show passion and enthusiasm for the instrument, and it takes guts to post samples of your playing on a drumming forum. However, in order to progress as a self taught drummer, you first need to acknowledge that you have things to learn and room to grow. After 30 years of drumming, I'm better than ever, but also more aware than ever of my own shortcomings and the skills I could still improve on. I don't tell you these things as a boastful bastard, but as someone who has been humbled again and again by the instrument, other drummers and the hard work required to get good at drumming.

I have 1 simple suggestion if you don't want to go the DVD route, which is to recommend playing to a metronome to improve the consistency of your timing. You could argue that it's "organic" and just what you "feel", but ultimately organic timing doesn't fly when it comes to actually playing with other musicians. Also, many excellent musicians who strive for a natural and organic feel work their entire lives to develop their skills to the point of being able to play with fluidity and feel, all while maintaining consistency.

It might not be a popular message, but my mother always told me, "Good enough never is". This advice has kept me constantly striving to do better, and if you're going to be self-taught, you need the intrinsic motivation.
 


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