Nick Mason: Criminally Underrated or Overrated and Talented?

BennyK

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neither he's rated

perfect for the band,
or it wouldn't have been
the same Pink Freud.

I think his "style" was of many of the early invasion British (pop?) drummers. All born in the earlier forties
(that would include) Graeme Edge, Ringo, Charlie, Bev Bevan Simon Kirke.... economical...feel drummers...and about 10 others)
that wouldn't include the intellectual or inquisitive like Jon Christensen, Ginger Baker or Jon Hiseman.

Mason more like Graeme Edge.
That's a lot of very popular albums..
Pink Freud . Flom Rondon? Iss goot ja !!
 

JazzDrumGuy

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Crucial part of the Floyd sound....like Ringo, Charlie, Keith, Ginger, Neil, etc. The band would not be the same sound and feel without him....
 

musiqman

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The last concert me and my pops watched together when he played with hos own Saucerful tour in Amsterdam.

He loved it, I liked it.

I'm more of the Division Bell/PULSE era. On the latter, he did more heavy lifting (especially on the second part). The double bass surely got used on Run Like Hell, there.
 
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Vicey

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It doesn't surprise me that Nick's band does the early PF material. I think he was at his most creative and engaged in the more experimental Syd through Dark Side era. After that, I would wager that expensive cars became more interesting than trying to give Roger exactly what he wanted.
 

CC Cirillo

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I recall reading that, supposedly, Jeff Porcaro was brought in to play on “Mother” on The Wall because Mr. Mason was not comfortable with it.

I have, however, always enjoyed his “feel” on DS of the M.
 

DrummerJustLikeDad

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I'm plagiarizing myself here, from copy to paste, but here goes.

Nick Mason is Prog’s Ringo.

A signature and deceptively simple groove, a man unfairly drawing criticism of “right place/right time”, but just try and cop this man’s moves, because you just won’t pull it off.
 

thejohnlec

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I'm plagiarizing myself here, from copy to paste, but here goes.

Nick Mason is Prog’s Ringo.

A signature and deceptively simple groove, a man unfairly drawing criticism of “right place/right time”, but just try and cop this man’s moves, because you just won’t pull it off.
Interesting characterization, seems accurate. Even his fills had a groove. Floyd was about textures and space, and he respected that.
 

backtodrum

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Interesting characterization, seems accurate. Even his fills had a groove. Floyd was about textures and space, and he respected that.
I would venture to say that Mason was also limited in what he played by Rogers and Gilmore and the producers that produced the Pink Floyd song catalogue. I have heard and read about other drummers playing in a more busy style only to be told by Gilmore or Waters "to play it like Nick" simple and in the groove if you will. His band members liked that minimalist for the song grooves and fills. Now knowing what we do about Waters and the micromanager he was, I would say that so much of what was played was other band members influence as well. I know I'm just speculating, but my conclusions stem from interviews and articles I've read over the years about what recording was like for them in the studio.
 

Houndog

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I have no thoughts on over or under …
He sure played in a great band though …
 

musiqman

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I would venture to say that Mason was also limited in what he played by Rogers and Gilmore and the producers that produced the Pink Floyd song catalogue. I have heard and read about other drummers playing in a more busy style only to be told by Gilmore or Waters "to play it like Nick" simple and in the groove if you will. His band members liked that minimalist for the song grooves and fills. Now knowing what we do about Waters and the micromanager he was, I would say that so much of what was played was other band members influence as well. I know I'm just speculating, but my conclusions stem from interviews and articles I've read over the years about what recording was like for them in the studio.
Its Gilmour.
 

snappy

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I have heard-cant remember where- Nick playing very busy stuff on demos prior to the recordings and then a whole lot less on the records.
He's no slouch.
On the studio releases a lot of the rhythms the 4 played separately weren't technically difficult but
as an ensemble a lot of ground got covered.
 

dyland

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I recall reading that, supposedly, Jeff Porcaro was brought in to play on “Mother” on The Wall because Mr. Mason was not comfortable with it.

I have, however, always enjoyed his “feel” on DS of the M.
I've always found this odd, since Mason does a great job on Have a Cigar, which is equally complex from a meter standpoint. I've read that the decision was based on both Mason's trepidation and the studio costs, so I guess it was simply more cost effective to bring in Jeff than spend the extra studio time trying to find a part with Mason.

Bonus fun fact, the snare drummer on Bring the Boys Back Home is none other than Joe Porcaro.
 

cruddola

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Like Starkey to the Beatles, Watts to the stones, Bissonnette to Maynard Ferguson, Mason was a perfect fit. Mason could ride a groove very few can. Absolute perfection.
 

langmick

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Can it be both? I had to learn a lot of PF and he's a bit over-rated but his grooves are so hard to reproduce. Us and Them...can't rush that.

His new band is really good, and sounds perfect with his brand of idiosyncratic and weird drumming. He gives it that psychedelic sound and just goes for it. No one else could do it just like him. He puts his fingerprint on it.
 


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