One drum company for all of your drumming needs?

felis

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Ludwig drums
Yamaha tom mount and hardware


Are you "all Yamaha" guys using their bass drum pedals too?
Which models?
fp9500d and dfp9500d for me.
 
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TrickRoll

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Yamaha - every other company has let me down in one area or another.

My favorite fail was a DW hi-hat stand that wouldn't stand up on a level floor.

Sonor was good - but hardware was way beyond what was necessary.

Gretsch made lovely sounding drums but terrible hardware; drums had minor issues with the exception of one set.

Ludwig Club Date was cool with the exception of a floor tom with bad bearing edges that was almost impossible to tune. Hardware OK.

Loved my Slingerland sets (40's, 50's, 60's, 70's, and 80's) but had repeated problems with stripped threads on hardware.

Inde kit has been reliable and wonderful for gigging. Still haven't warmed up to the aluminum snare, but it's probably me rather than the drum.

I loved an old Premier kit that I had; good chrome and hardware was solid; drums were fantastic.

Limited experience with Pearl, Leedy, Rogers, and Tama.
 

Johnny D

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Interesting thread...

Seeing that I only play vintage drums from the 60s and 70s and mostly vintage hardware from that same period, I say vintage Gretsch, right down to their Walberg & Auge hardware that everyone hates. I'm using DW Ultralight cymbal stands and a DW throne, but my Buck Rogers snare stands, Gretsch Monster hi hat and Floating Action BD pedal are all 50+ years old.

If it was good enough for Elvin Jones, Tony Williams, Charlie Watts and a slew of others, then it's good enough for me.

I love the idea of using stuff that people used 50+ years ago because that's all there was, and they made it work.
 

eaglewing59

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This type of thread has probably been done before, and I didn't search.
But I have some time to kill, so I'll start this up and see where it goes.

One drum company for all your needs, who would you pick?
I'm talking hardware, toms, snares, everything (except cymbals, of course).
I realize this is all a matter of opinion, but here's my picks, with some reasoning to back it up.

*** #1 - Tama

Pros: Very nice hardware and excellent pedals. My favorite is the good old Iron Cobra.
I've also enjoyed Starclassic and Starphonic snare drums. Probably my favorite by far.
Good selections of types of woods across the board for toms and bass drums.

Cons: I really don't like the latest rubber gasket tom mounting brackets.
Sure it isolates the shell and the resonance is good, but the toms flop around too much for me.
I position my toms as low to the bass drum as possible, and I'm always having to adjust them to keep them from bumping into the bass drum and each other.
It's also a drag that it takes sometimes 6-8 months to get any add-on toms for my kits.

*** #2 - Pearl

Pearl was a big player in the 90's but for some reason, unknown to me, that aren't as popular as they once were, at least in my area (central PA).
My local drum shop doesn't even carry that much Pearl equipment anymore. They used to have it all.

Pros: Nice hardware and pedals. I really like the Eliminator pedals. Demon pedals never worked for my personally, but that's not to say they are "bad".
Nice snare drums, the sensitone line is very good quality for the money.
I think the Session Studio (select and classic) are really good drums for the price.

Cons: Many people dislike the tubular tom mounting system, mostly based on "looks". For me, it's fine.

*** #3 - DW

A lot of folks seem to really like or really hate DW. I'm somewhere in the middle.

Pros: They make some really nice snare drums.
Add on toms are readily available in many sizes, especially in the Performance line.
If you want to make a kit with very specific tom sizes and depths, you can probably get it done with DW.

Cons: The hardware stands are high quality, but often too heavy and very expensive.
I have a love/hate thing with my 5000 series bass drum pedals.
Sometimes they feel right, and other times they don't.
I did grind down the "meat tenderizer" heel plate on my pedals.

*** #4 - Yamaha

Pros: The stage custom is a good starter kit and a good kit to take out on gigs.
I have a Recording Custom kit, and it might be the best sounding kit I ever played (after some mods, which I'll state in the cons).
Snares are nice, but I never ended up keeping any of them, favoring the brands listed above.

Cons: While the stage custom is "good for the money" it's not without flaws.
I've had issues with memory locks stripping out and once received a new bass drum that had some separation of the plys.
The Recording Customs and Absolute Hybid Maples are nice, but very expensive.
While I like the positioning ability of the YESS mounts, they do seem to kill the resonance on my RC toms.
When I hold the tom by the mount, in my hand, they resonated nicely.
When I mounted them, the resonance vanished. I tried many different heads and tunings.
I finally resolved the issue by adding the RIMMS suspension to the toms.
More money spent on an already expensive kit.

So, what about Sonor, Mapex, Ludwig, etc?
I did try the Ludwig Atlas Pro BD pedal. It was nice, but I ended up sticking with my Tama and Pearl pedals.
I do have a Supraphonic snare drum that came with my first real kit in the 80's.
It's okay, and I keep it for sentimental reasons (so many gigs played with it), but I prefer the other brands mentioned above.

Honestly, I don't have enough experience other brands to make an opinion.
How many different brands can one person own?
I love my Tamas. I have DW stands and pedals. Love them but the stands are heavy. I would not get rid of my 5000 or my 9000 pedals, best I’ve ever played. The new Tama Star stands I would probably switch to if I could. They are more pricey than the DWs. I like the build on them though. So on the whole I would go Tama.
 

Vistalite Black

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The pointlessness of the question reminds me of a similar query I sometimes pose when conversation lags, "If you were stuck on a desert island and could only eat one food during a years-long stay, what would you eat?"

My answer is always, Fried chicken. I'd never get tired of it, and it's great hot on a cool night and still very good at picnic temperature on a hot day.
 

YabaMTV

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This type of thread has probably been done before, and I didn't search.
But I have some time to kill, so I'll start this up and see where it goes.

One drum company for all your needs, who would you pick?
I'm talking hardware, toms, snares, everything (except cymbals, of course).
I realize this is all a matter of opinion, but here's my picks, with some reasoning to back it up.

*** #1 - Tama

Pros: Very nice hardware and excellent pedals. My favorite is the good old Iron Cobra.
I've also enjoyed Starclassic and Starphonic snare drums. Probably my favorite by far.
Good selections of types of woods across the board for toms and bass drums.

Cons: I really don't like the latest rubber gasket tom mounting brackets.
Sure it isolates the shell and the resonance is good, but the toms flop around too much for me.
I position my toms as low to the bass drum as possible, and I'm always having to adjust them to keep them from bumping into the bass drum and each other.
It's also a drag that it takes sometimes 6-8 months to get any add-on toms for my kits.

*** #2 - Pearl

Pearl was a big player in the 90's but for some reason, unknown to me, that aren't as popular as they once were, at least in my area (central PA).
My local drum shop doesn't even carry that much Pearl equipment anymore. They used to have it all.

Pros: Nice hardware and pedals. I really like the Eliminator pedals. Demon pedals never worked for my personally, but that's not to say they are "bad".
Nice snare drums, the sensitone line is very good quality for the money.
I think the Session Studio (select and classic) are really good drums for the price.

Cons: Many people dislike the tubular tom mounting system, mostly based on "looks". For me, it's fine.

*** #3 - DW

A lot of folks seem to really like or really hate DW. I'm somewhere in the middle.

Pros: They make some really nice snare drums.
Add on toms are readily available in many sizes, especially in the Performance line.
If you want to make a kit with very specific tom sizes and depths, you can probably get it done with DW.

Cons: The hardware stands are high quality, but often too heavy and very expensive.
I have a love/hate thing with my 5000 series bass drum pedals.
Sometimes they feel right, and other times they don't.
I did grind down the "meat tenderizer" heel plate on my pedals.

*** #4 - Yamaha

Pros: The stage custom is a good starter kit and a good kit to take out on gigs.
I have a Recording Custom kit, and it might be the best sounding kit I ever played (after some mods, which I'll state in the cons).
Snares are nice, but I never ended up keeping any of them, favoring the brands listed above.

Cons: While the stage custom is "good for the money" it's not without flaws.
I've had issues with memory locks stripping out and once received a new bass drum that had some separation of the plys.
The Recording Customs and Absolute Hybid Maples are nice, but very expensive.
While I like the positioning ability of the YESS mounts, they do seem to kill the resonance on my RC toms.
When I hold the tom by the mount, in my hand, they resonated nicely.
When I mounted them, the resonance vanished. I tried many different heads and tunings.
I finally resolved the issue by adding the RIMMS suspension to the toms.
More money spent on an already expensive kit.

So, what about Sonor, Mapex, Ludwig, etc?
I did try the Ludwig Atlas Pro BD pedal. It was nice, but I ended up sticking with my Tama and Pearl pedals.
I do have a Supraphonic snare drum that came with my first real kit in the 80's.
It's okay, and I keep it for sentimental reasons (so many gigs played with it), but I prefer the other brands mentioned above.

Honestly, I don't have enough experience other brands to make an opinion.
How many different brands can one person own?

You can’t beat Noble & Cooley Drums but they do not make hardware so I am going to go with DW. Tama makes great hardware as well but since I own and would prefer a 1990’s DW Professional Kit with gold plated hardware it is DW. I also own a lot more of the DW hardware than Tama. However, that is because after buying a bunch of small Tama hardware like splash cymbal holders that attach to other stands I bought the DW kit. I liked the DW hardware as much Tama, and in some cases more than Tama (HH Stand and Bass Pedals) as Tama so decided to stick with DW. I like the tension plates for adjusting angles that Tama invented. What a great invention. Just fantastic!
 

JimmySticks

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The pointlessness of the question reminds me of a similar query I sometimes pose when conversation lags, "If you were stuck on a desert island and could only eat one food during a years-long stay, what would you eat?"

My answer is always, Fried chicken. I'd never get tired of it, and it's great hot on a cool night and still very good at picnic temperature on a hot day.
It's pizza...with anchovies if I could get them! :-D

(sorry, back to the topic)
 

lrod1707

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As a Ludwig drum & Gibraltar hardware owner, I'd say any of the big drum companies have you covered. They all make drums and pretty much all the hardware you would need. I've chosen Gibraltar vs. Ludwig's hardware because they are a hardware specific company. That's all they do and they do it well. Plus they sell all the little parts, accessories and extras that you might need.
 

Deafmoon

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I remember Kim Plainfield (deceased) and I were sitting in a lounge having cigars one Saturday afternoon talking drums and music. I had just picked up a new Gretsch USA kit and I was raving about the sound. Kim kept telling me to one day go out and get a Sonor kit. He insisted the tone was the most superior he had ever heard. Kim loved Sonor. He did play Yamaha too, but he swore up, down and sideways on Sonor. When I finally played them, man was he right! Their sound is so rich in tone every other drum company falls flat. Check out Gavin Harrison or Steve Smith on Sonor, those drums just sing!
 

Genr

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So I’m new to this forum, but I’ll jump in with something that I think will provoke some debate. I currently own a Yamaha Birch Absolute kit, have owned Recording custom in the past, and was a big fan of the maple customs and absolute. All were manufactured by Sakae in Japan. Haven’t felt the same about the new Recording Custom or Absolute Hybrid, based on admittedly very limited exposure. Curious about how others feel about their newer lines..
 

rculberson

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So I’m new to this forum, but I’ll jump in with something that I think will provoke some debate. I currently own a Yamaha Birch Absolute kit, have owned Recording custom in the past, and was a big fan of the maple customs and absolute. All were manufactured by Sakae in Japan. Haven’t felt the same about the new Recording Custom or Absolute Hybrid, based on admittedly very limited exposure. Curious about how others feel about their newer lines..
Howdy, Genr! Welcome to the forum. Yamaha's newer lines are built to the same exacting quality standards as the Sakae-made drums. Some people are put off by MIC instead of MIJ, but the quality is still there. A buddy owned an Absolute Hybrid and I've had a chance to play it and the newer RC. Fit, finish and sound in both instances were all there.

That being said, I'm a fan of Sakae-made Yamaha drums, and own 3 different sets of them. Early 80's 9000GA (pre-Recording Custom designation), Mid 80's Tour Custom and 2012 Club Custom. I've been through a million sets, learning what I want and don't want along the way. These 3 Sakae-made sets, with accompanying bulletproof Yamaha hardware, are giving me everything I could possibly want or need.
 

Frank Godiva

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I remember Kim Plainfield (deceased) and I were sitting in a lounge having cigars one Saturday afternoon talking drums and music. I had just picked up a new Gretsch USA kit and I was raving about the sound. Kim kept telling me to one day go out and get a Sonor kit. He insisted the tone was the most superior he had ever heard. Kim loved Sonor. He did play Yamaha too, but he swore up, down and sideways on Sonor. When I finally played them, man was he right! Their sound is so rich in tone every other drum company falls flat. Check out Gavin Harrison or Steve Smith on Sonor, those drums just sing!
He knows the secret of the Sonor sound. Too bad the company had a bad reputation when comes to supporting endorsers on the road.

Once upon a time, Sonor was soup to nuts. Drum shells, snares, rims, hardware, sticks, cymbals, heads, wires, thrones, canister thrones, bags, cases, keys, pedals, beaters; mostly all made in house. Those days slipped away in the early 90s when the metal plating shut down and the KHS takeover.
 

RobbiefromAtlanta

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If only one company then it would have to be DW. Drums,hardware and pedals. Covers all the bases
 

Dumpy

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No love for Pearl, anyone?
I like all of the companies listed and have used all sometimes at the same time. My hardware sets are truly mongrel setups. I used to gig a lot and the constant set up and tear down would ruin stands.

Pearl gets used the least for me, though it always seems that a snare basket or hi hat stand gets picked up somewhere when something breaks. I love Pearl’s entry-level snare drums for some reason. I would always buy whatever Guitar Center Pearl piccolo snare special on whatever holiday sale and have several one-trick pony snare drums. For example: I had my rap snare I’d use on the rap songs my old band would play with an Ambassador tuned so tight that a hard hitter would dent the head; bonus? I had $60 into a snare that sounded fatter than a sample and more cutting, to boot! Want a tiny snare for a tiny kit? Pearl M80 or whatever 10” snare that you could always find for less than $50. And the hardware? It was always so easy to get a good snare stand or basket for a cheap price.
 

frankmott

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ALL my percussion needs? (except cymbals, of course)

What about sticks and heads?
 


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