opening band and changing cymbals, no sleeves or washers on stand :(

multijd

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I agree that the “headliner” was unhelpful and somewhat immature BUT felts, washers, sleeve protectors are always part of my gig gear. Those no nuts sleeves that have been talked about lately are great for this. Fit any stand and any cymbal. Quick on/off.
 

MaskingApathy

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I hate it that we are always expected to use a back line kit or share another’s kit .

It certainly isn’t expected of any other band members..

Could you imagine telling a guitarist all he needs are his picks and pedal board ?
A lot of times guitarists are told to use a backline amp and that can get annoying quick, like if they normally play a Marshall head and cab and now they're having to play a Fender combo or something like that.
 

Houndog

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A lot of times guitarists are told to use a backline amp and that can get annoying quick, like if they normally play a Marshall head and cab and now they're having to play a Fender combo or something like that.
They can cry me a River !!!!
 

MaskingApathy

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So in this kind of situation I'll usually bring my own stands too (at least just for the crashes) so I can switch the stands out quick. That way I don't have to worry about adjusting height also. However in the past I've refused to let other bands use my kit (done that a few times in the past and I'm just done with it now) and I've also refused to use the "headliner's" kit (or in that situation they were direct support for the actual headliner). It's honestly easier and faster for me to get my kit on stage and set up than to try to figure out how to get someone else's kit set up for me.
 

MaskingApathy

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They can cry me a River !!!!
Well it's more or less a similar situation as having to play someone else's kit. Completely different sound etc plus they have to figure out how to dial it in to sound ok for their sound. It's fine if it's a bunch of country bands sharing a deluxe reverb because they would all be using something like that anyway in their own rigs but otherwise it's honestly easier to let everyone bring their own amps. They just need to get it off stage quickly (which isn't that hard).
 

6topher

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It's a lack of foresight. Probably his, maybe yours.
If you have something uncommon you should probably consider that if you're backlining a multi band gig. Communicate pre-show if you can, but it'ss always a bit of a crapshoot. Nature of the beast.

I don't dig grombals, but I carry a 3 or 4 in my stick bag just in case. They have saved my ass a couple times.

As far as the backline kit, I don't mess with anything with a memory lock. Otherwise I adjust the best I can & get through the gig.
 

DamnSingerAlsoDrums

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Sorry, but the opening band are just about the lowest form of human life. That's just the reality of it.
This is so much of a pet peeve for me...There aren't low or high forms of human beings. We're all humans. Period. Do unto others for Pete's sake....

I've been on both sides of this as well and have always tried to be respectful of the main act and their crew and be as flexible and adaptative as possible when given restrictions. The same way, when my band started gaining momentum and our name started moving up on the marquees, we tried to delineate clearly what could/could not be touched or moved, all the while trying to be accomodating and friendly with the openers as much as we could.

You know what they say, be kind to the ones you meet on the way up cause you might just meet them again on the way down...

Imagine how stupid those who have been dismissive and rude to The Police, U2, Nirvanna, Radiohead or any other up and coming band/artist who just totally blew up globally must have felt!!!

I'm NOT putting myself in the same category as these guys, AT ALL!!! I'm just a medium fish for the very small pond I swim in (french Canada). But I've been up and down the roller coaster of success in my micro market enough times in my 25+ years career to learn that, a little kindness and human decency goes a long way.

It can (and did) sometimes come back in the form of a call for a writing collab, a guest appearance on a concert or on an album, once a supposedly "unimportant" openning act whom you treated with respect gets their big break. And sometimes this breath of fresh air/new exposure might just be what you and your band need to get out of a commercial/artistic lull.

I've openned shows for a few big international acts, on a few of them I had no contact whatsoever with the artist. A few others were polite, a few others were total butt chutes. But one stands out as a "life changing encounter".

My brother and I, in our late 20's had an acoustic folk duet. We got to open 3 nights for Daniel Lanois whom, at the time, we worshipped like a god! for those who don't know who he is, be prepared to have your mind blown because he produced some of the biggest and most influential albums in like, ever (U2's The Joshuah tree, Peter Gabriel's So among others...) And his first 2 singer/songwriter albums feature some very interesting and ecclectic drumming by Brian Blade...

The night prior to the first show, Mr Lanois had the absolute misfortune of having his truck full of gear stolen right out of his hotel parking lot. When we learned that in the morning, we spent the whole day on the phone calling all of our musician friends to procure him gear that was equivalent to his setup, guitars, pedals, amps, drums, we even lent him our steel player's pedal steel guitar. Anyhoo, we half-expected to find him in a very foul mood because of the theft, wich would have been thouroughly justified, but we were met with absolute gratitude and hugs all around. He watched our set from side stage the 3 nights and was extremely generous with his notes and compliments. He even invited us to join in on his pre-show harmony singing warm-up and to the post show restaurant meals, answering our many questions about his work, the biz, life etc.

At the end of the 3 days he gave us his personnal phone # and told us to call him up if we were ever in the LA area... Yeah right! As if!!! Well it turns out my brother and his wife took him up on the offer maybe a year later as she was in LA recording an album of her material (she's a crazily talented singer/cellist with a Tori Amos kinda vibe) . They phoned him up asking for an authorisation to record a never previously released french song of his that he played at that series of concerts. He accepted and did them one up by showing up at her studio to play and sing it with her...

Kindness and caring for others goes a long way and you never know what it might bring.
 
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jkuhl

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I hate it that we are always expected to use a back line kit or share another’s kit .

It certainly isn’t expected of any other band members..

Could you imagine telling a guitarist all he needs are his picks and pedal board ?
And the house guitar is a first act strat copy with only 4 strings.
 

Targalx

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And that’s why if I’m ever borrowing someone else’s kit or the house kit, I always bring my bag of Yamaha Crosstown hardware and have it ready in the trunk just in case. It’s the best insurance policy and I can use all of my hardware if everything is substandard up there.

Of course, I always bring pedal, snare, throne and cymbals. So all I’m really borrowing (if the kit is complete hell) are just the toms and kick.

Believe me, I’ve had my share of awful “drums du jour” supplied by who knows who.
 

Whitten

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This is so much of a pet peeve for me...There aren't low or high forms of human beings. We're all humans. Period. Do unto others for Pete's sake....


You know what they say, be kind to the ones you meet on the way up cause you might just meet them again on the way down...

Imagine how stupid those who have been dismissive and rude to The Police, U2, Nirvanna, Radiohead or any other up and coming band/artist who just totally blew up globally must have felt!!!
It is not my personal philosophy or how I live my life, I'm just pointing out the facts, the reality out there.
If you start out on the basis that you are going to get shafted by the headliners, then you'll never be disappointed and sometimes you'll be pleasantly surprised.
It doesn't really matter if you 'blow up', historically support bands have always been treated as an annoyance or necessary evil.
I have supported U2 and they were very nice as it happens. Although we were very much second best when it came to length of soundcheck, the PA and lights we were allowed to use.
I hear The Police are difficult characters, especially Sting.
I supported another famous band with a super accomplished, well known drummer and for three weeks he never once smiled at me in the corridor, let alone said "hi". That's just the reality. Headline bands are often under a lot of pressure and support musicians are often ignored as a result.
 

2and4

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I made that deal with an opening drummer. He had brought his own kit and was allowed by the promoter to use it. He couldn't be bothered. His band put a lot of pressure on my tour manager to get me to share my drums. The deal was nothing was to be moved.
they played their set. I got onstage with a few minutes to go before our set and every memory lock I had was moved, every single stand and mount was moved, cymbals lowered, toms repositioned, snare repositioned etc. If he had left the memory locks alone it would have been OK, a quick fix, but everything was undone and randomly moved out of the way. I was furious - and no, never again.
Yeah, there seems to be "that guy" that ruins the good will. Inevitably, the person coordinating the sharing of sets says "Thanks, this really makes things easy for everyone". I always look them in the eye and reply, "Yes, for everyone except me" to try to reinforce the no moving things rule and to let them know they share responsibility for enforcing the rule. But for the most part, if you just talk to the drummer and get a feel for him/her you'll know if they will be cool or not, and if not, hopefully there is room in front of your set for theirs.
 

VIRTUE Drums

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I second the notion of throwing a set of No Nuts cymbal sleeves in your stick bag for this sort of scenario. Otherwise you need to bring a variety of sleeves, felts, nuts, and cup washers since diameters and thread counts are not standardized across the brands you may encounter. A simple, quick one piece solution.
 

NoButsBill

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So, I was playing in the opening band this past weekend, and we were sharing a kit, minus cymbals, snare, bass drum pedal, and throne.
The main band drummer had those rubber sleeves that are attached to the cymbal itself, like a grommet.
So, he takes off the cymbal, and the stand is bare metal, no felt, no sleeve, no washer.
I said no way I'm putting my expensive cymbals on top of bare metal.
He kind of gave me an attitude, like it's my problem.
I looked in my hardware bag, and I had a few felts, and only one sleeve.
After a bit he finally said I can use his cymbals, and I did.

How common are these cymbal grommets? I do have some, but not on my gigging cymbals.
Was it wrong for me to not be prepared for bare metal cymbal stands?
Hello Hector,
Watch this video from No Nuts Percussion to see the solution to this issue with our Compression Fit Cymbal Sleeves. Carry these with you and never experience this problem again. Many backlines are starting to use our product for this specific reason. I look forward to your feedback.
 

NoButsBill

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So, I was playing in the opening band this past weekend, and we were sharing a kit, minus cymbals, snare, bass drum pedal, and throne.
The main band drummer had those rubber sleeves that are attached to the cymbal itself, like a grommet.
So, he takes off the cymbal, and the stand is bare metal, no felt, no sleeve, no washer.
I said no way I'm putting my expensive cymbals on top of bare metal.
He kind of gave me an attitude, like it's my problem.
I looked in my hardware bag, and I had a few felts, and only one sleeve.
After a bit he finally said I can use his cymbals, and I did.

How common are these cymbal grommets? I do have some, but not on my gigging cymbals.
Was it wrong for me to not be prepared for bare metal cymbal stands?

No Nuts works with 6mm and 8mm posts. Here is a link to see available products. The sleeves come in black red and silver sparkle.
 


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