Oriollo vs Jenkins Martin vs Wood (let's say Tama Star or other high end)

gbow

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Interested in someone who has actually played and experienced each of these types of shell. I'm mostly asking about full kits, not snares. Although snares are always interesting :)

Oriollo - Seamless Aluminum

Jenkins Martin - Wound Fiberglass

Tama Star - Wood (lets stick with Maple for comparison)


If you had a kit in the same sizes, same configurations, same heads, tuned the same. How would you describe the difference in these? You can go find videos of each, but it's difficult to understand as they are all recorded in different rooms, mics, tunings, heads, etc.

How would you order them in terms of tone? Resonance? Feel? I'm sure each of the manufacturers or owners of each type of kit can tell how they compare to a top end Maple kit. Might be difficult to find someone who could directly compare Oriollo to JM. How do the kick drums compare? Is there a type of music where one would be preferred over the others?

Thanks, gabo


Note: I could probably go visit JM as they are in OH and I'm in MI. I have no idea where to go play/hear an Oriollo kit. I can go to my drum room to play a Maple kit :) haha
 

JDA

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You're one person at once on either or any of them. Do you think they'd change who you are or want to be?
NOt sure the drum would add to one's drum vocabulary..it's possible..to get extremely inspired by the 'feel' of a set..

but isn't that just Tension (of heads) and Dimensions?
There's no "famous" recordings readily common and available within a Song structure of either (3) so can't go there...

Think it would come down to Tension (of heads) and Dimensions.
(So pick the one that best catches the eye is the "best" for someone.

I can't see them changing one's drum vocabulary any more than the other
if you like wood you like wood
if you like metal you like metal
if you like fiberglass you like fiberglass

Then you do you on either/any of them
 
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Ray Dee Oh King

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You're one person at once on either or any of them. Do you think they'd change who you are or want to be?
NOt sure the drum would add to one's drum vocabulary..it's possible..to get extremely inspired by the 'feel' of a set..

but isn't that just Tension (of heads) and Dimensions?
There's no "famous" recordings readily common and available within a Song structure of either (3) so can't go there...

Think it would come down to Tension (of heads) and Dimensions.
(So pick the one that catches the Eye best is the "best" for someone.

I can't see them changing one's drum vocabulary any more than the other
Im pretty sure JM shells are pretty much replications of Blaemire shells, no? They were on 10s of thousands of songs.
 

DanRH

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I currently own a JM kit and had an Oriollo Phantom kit for a brief time but have never owned a Tama Star kit (I would love to one day). All I can say, both the JM and Oriollo are wonderful kits that surprisingly to me were very similar from the drivers seat. Very woody comparable to a modern maple kit.
For me, the JM kit wins on all counts because it gave me the warm sound I was looking for and the durability needed for those outdoor festivals I do in the direct sunlight every summer. They are my lifetime kit for sure.

With an aluminum kit, since they are very thin and dent-able, that was the deciding factor for me. They sounded great. Perhaps a little brighter than the JM’s but not in a bad way. I love my Oriollo Phantom65 snare BTW over any aluminum snare I’ve ever owned (and that would be emphasized as many).

Here’s a video demo I did with my band back in 2015 with the JM kit and my Oriollo Phantom55 snare.

Hope this helps in some way.

20914484_10213373628042634_3636433158662098783_n.jpg
IMG_0071.JPG


 
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JDA

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wood, fiberglass and what was the third one? aluminum.

Tama. J-M. and Oriollo.

Which are the driest. Which have longest sustain.
How much of either of those two parameters do you want.

What hoops come on each. TF DC.
 

HalldorL

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I owned a J-M/Blaemire kit a few years back in 22/10/12/16 and own a Star Maple. Never laid sticks on Oriollo, yet.

Comparison?
J-M had a much cleaner, more direct tone than the Star Maple (or Walnut). They are warm and pretty sounding, great drums. I prefer Maple, more complex, especially Tama Star who sound close to older Camco’s but with more bite and projection. It’s a matter of personal taste really. You can’t go wrong though with Jenkins Martin.
 

gbow

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I currently own a JM kit and had an Oriollo Phantom kit for a brief time but have never owned a Tama Star kit (I would love to one day). All I can say, both the JM and Oriollo are wonderful kits that surprisingly to me were very similar from the drivers seat. Very woody comparable to a modern maple kit.
For me, the JM kit wins on all counts because it gave me the warm sound I was looking for and the durability needed for those outdoor festivals I do in the direct sunlight every summer. They are my lifetime kit for sure.
.............

Hope this helps


Thanks Dan, yes that does help. Can always depend on you for good info!

I owned a J-M/Blaemire kit a few years back in 22/10/12/16 and own a Star Maple. Never laid sticks on Oriollo, yet.

Comparison?
J-M had a much cleaner, more direct tone than the Star Maple (or Walnut). They are warm and pretty sounding, great drums. I prefer Maple, more complex, especially Tama Star who sound close to older Camco’s but with more bite and projection. It’s a matter of personal taste really. You can’t go wrong though with Jenkins Martin.

Thanks Haldori, that also helps.

So from these two responses, it sounds like the JM kits are very warm, maybe focused, with little to no overtones, is that accurate? And very durable.

Whereas the Oriollo kits are more along the same lines as a Maple kit, maybe a bit deeper? But not like a Vistalite?

I totally understand that it's a matter of "tastes" and that it's like "blonde, brunette, redhead..." But I know the difference between a blonde, brunette, and a redhead. I don't know the difference between an Oriollo, JM, and a typical Maple kit.

@JDA, it's not necessarily "what am I looking for" as much as it's just trying to understand the difference. Isn't this place about learning these things? I do a lot of work at a studio, I have many different kits. Sometimes played by someone other than myself, like the artists' drummer or another session guy. Maybe we invest in a couple of totally different kits for clients to choose from. We already have many different snares. Or maybe we just buy a couple of Bass drums to mix/match.

I understand what a Vistalite kit sounds like compared to a Maple kit, but I don't understand the difference between these kits. And you can't just go to the local music store and try these things. Vistalite kits are very loud, with an attack that is different and overtones that are different. Sometimes unmanageable, IMO, I wouldn't use them for Jazz or Metal. But for certain styles, especially if the music has "space" in it, they are great. Sometimes we use just a vistalite bass drum paired with an open metal snare for the overtones.

Thanks, gabo
 

HalldorL

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Thanks Haldori, that also helps.

So from these two responses, it sounds like the JM kits are very warm, maybe focused, with little to no overtones, is that accurate? And very durable.

They have overtones but not as complex as my Star drums. A more “direct” and clear sound (if that makes sense) and not as warm.
 

spaeth

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I have never had or heard an Oriollo kit in person but I have a JM kit and had it set up next to an Ayotte maple of similar sizes. I was consistently drawn to the JM. There is a clarity and depth to the sound on the JM that the Ayotte could not match. Tuning of the two was night and day for some reason as well. The JM you could practically set heads on it and they sound great at any tuning. The Ayotte could take days to dial in. The Ayotte did have the wood rims on it which could be a part of the equation. I just recently sold the Ayotte (which I didn’t think I would ever do) and I kept the JM kit.
 

stevil

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I'm madly in love with my J-M kit (13/16/24, with a 10 tom on order). It's true all-arounder kit. They have tons of head room, but are still responsive at low volume. It's such a cliché on forums like this, but it's the best drum set I've ever owned and they sound special enough that non-drummers/sound guys/bandmates go out of their way to compliment how they sound. I like that they're very responsive to different head combinations, or at least more so than other kits I've owned.

I haven't played an Oriollo aluminum kit, but I have limited experience with A&F aluminum shells from playing a kit in a local shop. The aluminum is much drier compared to the fiberglass. I personally prefer the fiberglass, but it's subjective. I sadly haven't had any studio sessions myself since buying them. However, I lent them to my friend Trent to record this album: https://coastlands.bandcamp.com/album/death
 

Matched Gripper

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I currently own a JM kit and had an Oriollo Phantom kit for a brief time but have never owned a Tama Star kit (I would love to one day). All I can say, both the JM and Oriollo are wonderful kits that surprisingly to me were very similar from the drivers seat. Very woody comparable to a modern maple kit.
For me, the JM kit wins on all counts because it gave me the warm sound I was looking for and the durability needed for those outdoor festivals I do in the direct sunlight every summer. They are my lifetime kit for sure.

With an aluminum kit, since they are very thin and dent-able, that was the deciding factor for me. They sounded great. Perhaps a little brighter than the JM’s but not in a bad way. I love my Oriollo Phantom65 snare BTW over any aluminum snare I’ve ever owned (and that would be emphasized as many).

Here’s a video demo I did with my band back in 2015 with the JM kit and my Oriollo Phantom55 snare.

Hope this helps in some way.

View attachment 537854 View attachment 537855

I owned a J-M/Blaemire kit a few years back in 22/10/12/16 and own a Star Maple. Never laid sticks on Oriollo, yet.

Comparison?
J-M had a much cleaner, more direct tone than the Star Maple (or Walnut). They are warm and pretty sounding, great drums. I prefer Maple, more complex, especially Tama Star who sound close to older Camco’s but with more bite and projection. It’s a matter of personal taste really. You can’t go wrong though with Jenkins Martin.
I would think that the Oriollo’s would be on the other side of the spectrum from the J-M drums, J-M’s having a more focused tone and the Oriollo’s having a wider tonal spectrum and distinctly metallic tone. Yes, no?

PS: would love to hear Oriolo’s (aluminum or copper), in rock sizes played by a rocker like @HalldorL or @Whitten. Might set off a few alarms.
 
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gbow

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Great info here, thanks.

From what I'm hearing it sounds like the JMs would be more to my liking than the Oriollo's. But they both sound like very nice drums.

gabo
 


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