Oriollo vs Jenkins Martin vs Wood (let's say Tama Star or other high end)

Matched Gripper

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Great info here, thanks.

From what I'm hearing it sounds like the JMs would be more to my liking than the Oriollo's. But they both sound like very nice drums.

gabo
Have you seen the Oriollo/Sinclair videos?
 

Steech

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I'm madly in love with my J-M kit (13/16/24, with a 10 tom on order). It's true all-arounder kit. They have tons of head room, but are still responsive at low volume. It's such a cliché on forums like this, but it's the best drum set I've ever owned and they sound special enough that non-drummers/sound guys/bandmates go out of their way to compliment how they sound. I like that they're very responsive to different head combinations, or at least more so than other kits I've owned.

I haven't played an Oriollo aluminum kit, but I have limited experience with A&F aluminum shells from playing a kit in a local shop. The aluminum is much drier compared to the fiberglass. I personally prefer the fiberglass, but it's subjective. I sadly haven't had any studio sessions myself since buying them. However, I lent them to my friend Trent to record this album: https://coastlands.bandcamp.com/album/death
I love the idea of a 10/13/16 tom setup, regardless of BD size. It seems like such a smart way to get a super wide frequency range dialed in. I’ll have to try that out someday.
 

gbow

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So the lesson from this thread is...

JM wound fiberglass drums and Oriollo seamless aluminum and copper drums don't take a back seat to anyone!

They both offer top quality products in both sound and aesthetics. They deserve your attention and consideration when looking for your "dream kit."

Do they offer a different sound and vibe to a wood kit? Maybe a bit, but probably less than most people would realize. While the materials used don't instantly take your mind to "warm and punchy," they indeed are.

IMO, in a blind listening test, most would have a difficult time picking out these from Maple, Birch, Oak, Bubinga, Beech, Mahogany, etc. Those different woods and different ply configurations, different bearing edges, and different hoops seem to offer as much variation as these drums do.

gabo
 

DanRH

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So the lesson from this thread is...

JM wound fiberglass drums and Oriollo seamless aluminum and copper drums don't take a back seat to anyone!

They both offer top quality products in both sound and aesthetics. They deserve your attention and consideration when looking for your "dream kit."

Do they offer a different sound and vibe to a wood kit? Maybe a bit, but probably less than most people would realize. While the materials used don't instantly take your mind to "warm and punchy," they indeed are.

IMO, in a blind listening test, most would have a difficult time picking out these from Maple, Birch, Oak, Bubinga, Beech, Mahogany, etc. Those different woods and different ply configurations, different bearing edges, and different hoops seem to offer as much variation as these drums do.

gabo
100%
 

Steech

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So the lesson from this thread is...

JM wound fiberglass drums and Oriollo seamless aluminum and copper drums don't take a back seat to anyone!

They both offer top quality products in both sound and aesthetics. They deserve your attention and consideration when looking for your "dream kit."

Do they offer a different sound and vibe to a wood kit? Maybe a bit, but probably less than most people would realize. While the materials used don't instantly take your mind to "warm and punchy," they indeed are.

IMO, in a blind listening test, most would have a difficult time picking out these from Maple, Birch, Oak, Bubinga, Beech, Mahogany, etc. Those different woods and different ply configurations, different bearing edges, and different hoops seem to offer as much variation as these drums do.

gabo
Yup.
 

fusseltier

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I've got my 8 Piece tama star walnut and matching 14x6.5 snare on the power tower rack system and many cymbals. Some casters would help if you don't want to remove anything because it is very heavy.
 

Steech

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The J-M kits are consistently one of the top sounding kits at the Chicago Vintage drum show . They are my favourite non wood shell drums made today .
How pricey are they compared to other high end kits? As in what would a 5-piece kit cost more or less?
 


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