OT: First the bad news, then more bad news

shuffle

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Bob,i have a dear friend with the same problem as yourself only worse.
He thought it was his prostate he was sitting on as he gigged,it wasnt,it was a tumor in his colon plus prostate cancer.
My prayers are up today with you in them!
 

Matched Gripper

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I don't usually bring personal issues to the forum, because I'm really more of a private person, but I thought this important enough that I should share with anyone else facing the same circumstance. Also, I'm not looking for sympathy, but rather, just trying to get an important message out there.

So I got the bad news last Tuesday, that I have prostate cancer. They always check when I have my yearly and it turns out my PSA was quite elevated. The urologist couldn't give me any definitive answers, other than to say " you do have cancer". He then refers me to an oncologist, who was suppose to see me next Monday. Now it's not everyday that they tell you that you have cancer, so I'm am very worried. Maybe some here will think I'm overreacting, but cancer is cancer and it's scary.

Here's the other piece of bad news. I get a call from the oncologists office, who I'm suppose to see for my initial visit in a week. His nurse asks if I feel the need to see the Dr. in person, or can he call me. Apparently, because of a rise in local COVID cases, they want to limit in person office visits. His nurse says he will call me. Gee, thanks lady. I've got cancer and you tell me the Dr. won't see me in person? So I ask her how then exactly is he going to treat me, if he doesn't want to be near me? "Dr. ****** will go over that with you next week." Great!!

So now I have to wait and worry another week. Cancer is growing inside me and they fiddle fart around thinking about how they are going to treat me, without even seeing me? THIS my friends is a classic example of the collateral damage, that has been occurring in this country, for the past 10 months.

My message to anyone else facing a similar experience, FIGHT FOR YOUR RIGHTS as a patient. Insist on in person care if faced with a life threatening disease and don't back down. I'm not going to. I have a beautiful, amazing wife and two amazing daughters to live for.

People need to see that there is a serious problem within the medical community and patients not getting the proper care that they deserve. And it all stems from not having access to in person visits, because of these new circumstances we find ourselves in.

So finally, my message to the mods, I really don't want this post deleted, so at the very least pin it, with no comments allowed.
It’s important to be an educated medical consumer. Below are some resources you may find helpful.


 
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noreastbob

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As has been said above: If a man lives long enough he WILL develop prostate cancer. It's kind of one of natures ways of saying, "You've been around long enough and it's not fair all the youngins have to take care of you!"
Now it can hit at any age but rarely does it rear its ugly head till late 50s or later.
 

dcrigger

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David, Thanks for the positive vibes. I did have a biopsy and it was confirmed to be cancer. I guess I'll know more once I have my phone visit next week.
Bob - Well obviously that's a drag. But as others have written, this is most often a battle well worth fighting and most often won, though it does take awhile. Two of my four friends are actually on the other side of what you are next facing - one has been clear for about a year, the other fro a few years... the first went the radiation route, the second had surgery...

As for my post, I clearly read you too literally - though I'm glad to share what I shared - as a year ago when I received that first elevated PSA, I quickly realized that I literally knew nothing about prostate cancer at all. But thank you for taking it as positively as I intended it.

Anyway, I wish you the best of luck with this and will be thinking of you. Hang in there.

David
 

chillybase

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May you have a speedy recovery. My uncle had prostate cancer but they were able to remove it. This was about 6 or 7 years ago. He is in his late 70s now. Coincidentally he is my uncle Bobby.
 

Edward

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My PSA tripled in a 6 month time period. I was sure I had prostate cancer. The biopsy showed only prostatitis. I was diagnosed 6 months before this ( unrelated) with lung cancer. Thankful it hadn’t spread and they removed 1/2 of my left lung and I am now under active surveillance. You will get thru this and come out better on the other side. Please keep us updated brother.
 

Kevinpursuit

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The good news is they have come a long way in treating prostate cancer as compared to 20 years ago. Prostate cancer is one of the slowest growing cancers and it seems they caught it early enough for a great prognosis.
I would venture to say you will come out of this with a great outcome.
So don’t fear you will come out of this okay!
 

Cpb282

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I’ve had several cases of PC in my family. While the word “cancer” results in fear, not all cancer is the same, including not all PC. My dad was diagnosed 5+ years ago with it, with a Gleason score of 7 (3+4) - you’ll learn lots about Gleason scoring. Because of the size of the lesions, because they were encapsulated, and because he was very active (late 60s when diagnosed), he decided to go the “active surveillance” route. PSAs every 6 mos, imaging every year, etc. His lesions have not grown and he’s been extremely active since then. He’s now 75 and still working (by choice). My grandfather was diagnosed at about 60, and lived until he was 93 (PC is not what did him in) - he was one of the early recipients of radioactive seed implants.

If you want to message me I can give you my contact info and give you all of what I learned through the process with my dad.
 

Monday317

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I don't usually bring personal issues to the forum, because I'm really more of a private person, but I thought this important enough that I should share with anyone else facing the same circumstance. Also, I'm not looking for sympathy, but rather, just trying to get an important message out there.

So I got the bad news last Tuesday, that I have prostate cancer. They always check when I have my yearly and it turns out my PSA was quite elevated. The urologist couldn't give me any definitive answers, other than to say " you do have cancer". He then refers me to an oncologist, who was suppose to see me next Monday. Now it's not everyday that they tell you that you have cancer, so I'm am very worried. Maybe some here will think I'm overreacting, but cancer is cancer and it's scary.

Here's the other piece of bad news. I get a call from the oncologists office, who I'm suppose to see for my initial visit in a week. His nurse asks if I feel the need to see the Dr. in person, or can he call me. Apparently, because of a rise in local COVID cases, they want to limit in person office visits. His nurse says he will call me. Gee, thanks lady. I've got cancer and you tell me the Dr. won't see me in person? So I ask her how then exactly is he going to treat me, if he doesn't want to be near me? "Dr. ****** will go over that with you next week." Great!!

So now I have to wait and worry another week. Cancer is growing inside me and they fiddle fart around thinking about how they are going to treat me, without even seeing me? THIS my friends is a classic example of the collateral damage, that has been occurring in this country, for the past 10 months.

My message to anyone else facing a similar experience, FIGHT FOR YOUR RIGHTS as a patient. Insist on in person care if faced with a life threatening disease and don't back down. I'm not going to. I have a beautiful, amazing wife and two amazing daughters to live for.

People need to see that there is a serious problem within the medical community and patients not getting the proper care that they deserve. And it all stems from not having access to in person visits, because of these new circumstances we find ourselves in.

So finally, my message to the mods, I really don't want this post deleted, so at the very least pin it, with no comments allowed.
Been there, done that, had the surgery at the local VA Hospital. The bad news was that mine was aggressive and there was no non-surgical option leaving me with permanent ED. Good news is, I'm here to whine about it and prostate cancer is usually localized, not a harbinger of worse to come.

It ain't fun my friend; tough times await. I was 63 when it all went down and have three kids still at home. Being in good health, I had to move quick or not be alive by Christmas.

PM if I can help you get through.
 

Elvis

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I don't usually bring personal issues to the forum, because I'm really more of a private person, but I thought this important enough that I should share with anyone else facing the same circumstance. Also, I'm not looking for sympathy, but rather, just trying to get an important message out there.

So I got the bad news last Tuesday, that I have prostate cancer. They always check when I have my yearly and it turns out my PSA was quite elevated. The urologist couldn't give me any definitive answers, other than to say " you do have cancer". He then refers me to an oncologist, who was suppose to see me next Monday. Now it's not everyday that they tell you that you have cancer, so I'm am very worried. Maybe some here will think I'm overreacting, but cancer is cancer and it's scary.

Here's the other piece of bad news. I get a call from the oncologists office, who I'm suppose to see for my initial visit in a week. His nurse asks if I feel the need to see the Dr. in person, or can he call me. Apparently, because of a rise in local COVID cases, they want to limit in person office visits. His nurse says he will call me. Gee, thanks lady. I've got cancer and you tell me the Dr. won't see me in person? So I ask her how then exactly is he going to treat me, if he doesn't want to be near me? "Dr. ****** will go over that with you next week." Great!!

So now I have to wait and worry another week. Cancer is growing inside me and they fiddle fart around thinking about how they are going to treat me, without even seeing me? THIS my friends is a classic example of the collateral damage, that has been occurring in this country, for the past 10 months.

My message to anyone else facing a similar experience, FIGHT FOR YOUR RIGHTS as a patient. Insist on in person care if faced with a life threatening disease and don't back down. I'm not going to. I have a beautiful, amazing wife and two amazing daughters to live for.

People need to see that there is a serious problem within the medical community and patients not getting the proper care that they deserve. And it all stems from not having access to in person visits, because of these new circumstances we find ourselves in.

So finally, my message to the mods, I really don't want this post deleted, so at the very least pin it, with no comments allowed.
Sorry to hear that Bob.
My dad passed away from that, back in '94.
Things have come a long way since then, though.
I've been doing a lot of ZOOM meetings with my Dr's lately.
If you can, ask for one of those. At least you'll be face-to-face with the doc, because I agree, a phone call is kinda....lackadaisical, if you ask me.
Hope you fly through this quickly and easily. Be strong my friend.

Elvis
 
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I don't usually bring personal issues to the forum, because I'm really more of a private person, but I thought this important enough that I should share with anyone else facing the same circumstance. Also, I'm not looking for sympathy, but rather, just trying to get an important message out there.

So I got the bad news last Tuesday, that I have prostate cancer. They always check when I have my yearly and it turns out my PSA was quite elevated. The urologist couldn't give me any definitive answers, other than to say " you do have cancer". He then refers me to an oncologist, who was suppose to see me next Monday. Now it's not everyday that they tell you that you have cancer, so I'm am very worried. Maybe some here will think I'm overreacting, but cancer is cancer and it's scary.

Here's the other piece of bad news. I get a call from the oncologists office, who I'm suppose to see for my initial visit in a week. His nurse asks if I feel the need to see the Dr. in person, or can he call me. Apparently, because of a rise in local COVID cases, they want to limit in person office visits. His nurse says he will call me. Gee, thanks lady. I've got cancer and you tell me the Dr. won't see me in person? So I ask her how then exactly is he going to treat me, if he doesn't want to be near me? "Dr. ****** will go over that with you next week." Great!!

So now I have to wait and worry another week. Cancer is growing inside me and they fiddle fart around thinking about how they are going to treat me, without even seeing me? THIS my friends is a classic example of the collateral damage, that has been occurring in this country, for the past 10 months.

My message to anyone else facing a similar experience, FIGHT FOR YOUR RIGHTS as a patient. Insist on in person care if faced with a life threatening disease and don't back down. I'm not going to. I have a beautiful, amazing wife and two amazing daughters to live for.

People need to see that there is a serious problem within the medical community and patients not getting the proper care that they deserve. And it all stems from not having access to in person visits, because of these new circumstances we find ourselves in.

So finally, my message to the mods, I really don't want this post deleted, so at the very least pin it, with no comments allowed.
[/QUOTE
A friend of mine just got over Prostate Cancer. If found early, it is very successful in beating. My prayers are with you. Phil
 

IVER

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I know a couple of guys who have had it and are doing all right. The fact that you do the test annually and they just detected it is encouraging. Keep us posted.
 

dlshore

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I was diagnosed in March of 2019 and had surgery that October. One of the most important things about prostate cancer is there are many different versions of it, some relatively slow growing and mostly harmless and some very aggressive. You have to know your Gleason Score to understand what you have. Based on the biopsy, I had a score of 6 (lowest possible) but every core had cancer cells, so pretty much everywhere. One doctor was willing to do surveillance if I was willing but that was too nerve wracking and it involved more biopsies. I chose robotic laparoscopic suregry. The advantages of surgery are 1) if it has not penetrated the capsule they can almost always get all of the cancer out (an mpMRI helps them determine that ahead of time) 2) the side effects are worse at the beginning and improve over time (rather than the other way around ala radiation) 3) post-surgery they look at the entire gland and determine your real Gleason score (mine moved to a 7) 4) you can still do radiation if there ever is a recurrence 5) they can do nerve sparing surgery. Feel free to get 2nd opinions - they expect you will. I went to two medical centers and met in total with an oncologist, 2 surgeons and 2 radiologists plus the original diagnosing urologist. Ask how many patients they have treated. As impersonal as it seems, I would say that a tele-health appointment won't change what they tell you much, but it is harder to get a sense of who you might trust more. When I have a choice of doctors, I usually pick the one that actually touches me. Good luck. There is a lot to learn since each person's situation can be so different, but there are a lot of good practitioners out there, too.
Feel free to pm me.
 

bbunks

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Hey. A doc tells me I have cancer and I’m going to have it on the front page the next day. Good luck. We’re here for you.
 

komodobob

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So I wanted to give everyone an update on my progress, regarding my prostate cancer. I ended up going to Highland Hospital in Rochester NY. I had the first of two procedures yesterday and the people there were the absolute best. As I mentioned in my OP, at first I was a little put off by the initial phone call appointment, but after I got there and met with the urologist, all of my fears subsided. He was a super nice guy and spent quite a long time explaining everything they were going to do and what they felt the results would be.

I decided to go with radiation, instead of surgery. It really seemed like the best option, for me anyway. I'll be doing a second and final procedure next week and hopefully after that this will all be behind me. Oh and I was able to come home last night, which made me very happy.

I think the biggest thing I struggled with was having to have that darn catheter in. I had to keep it in all night and it wasn't pleasant. For those of you that have done this, then you know what I'm talking about. Even though it is emptying your bladder, it still feels like you have to pee, constantly.

The Dr. said the success rate with this type of procedure is 90% to 95%, so that was good news. And as it turns out this is a much more involved operation than I first thought. There were two Doctors and three anesthesiologists. Who'd a thought I was so important? :dontknow:

Finally, I really wanted to thank all of you for the well wishes, prayers and willingness to share your own personal experiences with me and everyone else. This is a great forum and the community of men and women here is an important part of my life. Thank you.
 
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