OT - Learning a second language in your sixties.

bigbonzo

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I had a major stroke thirteen years ago, I certainly understand the memory issues. I've found that pushing myself to learn different things has been the best way to help my memory. That is another reason that I've decided to do this now. I need to fill idle time with something productive. I'll turn 62 the first week of May.
Maybe I'll give it another try. Especially since I just retired a couple days ago.
 

cworrick

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Sounds like a great plan!

I took Barely Survived 2 years of High School Spanish and don't remember much. Now I am in the construction area where there are a lot of Spanish speaking workers and it would be nice to talk with them easier.
 

Vistalite Black

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I'm fluent enough. I've nailed "una cerveza más por favor" and "dónde está el baño?"

Seriously, there are Facebook and other groups who get together for virtual conversation sessions. Those are super-helpful in mastering the essential phrases.

In English, 100 words account for 50% of what people typically use. You can get buy pretty well on those in any language.

How Many Words Does the Average Person Know? – Word Counter
 

Squirrel Man

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Sounds like a great plan!

I took Barely Survived 2 years of High School Spanish and don't remember much. Now I am in the construction area where there are a lot of Spanish speaking workers and it would be nice to talk with them easier.
Donde esta casa de pe pe
 

TPC

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My wife and I honeymooned in France. I decided that I would learn basic French before going. (I think it's just common respect to learn the basics of the language of your host country before spending any significant time there.) I used one of those CD/book courses and I listened to it in my car on my way to work for several months. It worked! I was able to communicate the basics of daily life with my hosts. One of my French friends even said, "presque sans accent!", which made me happy.

Good luck, drummer 5359!
 

Pink69

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What are your impressions on the Babble system? How do you think it compares with other language courses?? Thanks
 

drawtheline55

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Learning a language is cool here is what I took in high school and college
6 yrs of Latin
4 yrs of French
2 yrs of Spanish
1 yr of German
and at the end of my senior yr in college was starting to learn some Chinese.
 

BennyK

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I think we should all be learning how to say ' please' and 'thank you ' in Chinese .

English is my primary language but I'm reasonably fluent in Polish and French . If I was lost in Moscow , I could find my way to the Canadian embassy or airport . I wouldn't mind getting a handle on Basque and Armenian .
 
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RIDDIM

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I learned to speak Thai through some lessons but for me the advances came when I dared speak with native speakers and learned the nuances of tone, rhythm and phrasing as actually spoken in the street. I am these days quite fluent and can even read the very different "alphabet". Good luck with the learning curve.
Good for you! That's the trickiest language I've dealt with so far, especially following the script.
 

RIDDIM

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It's good to keep the mind active.

That said, studying a given language (or musical idiom) is great; what really helps is immersion. Babies don't learn languages because someone gives them a dictionary and grammar book. They learn by picking up cues from the sounds around them and emulating what gets them what they need. So immerse yourself to the maximum extent possible and don't be afraid of making mistakes.
 

Squirrel Man

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I think we should all be learning how to say ' please' and 'thank you ' in Chinese .

English is my primary language but I'm reasonably fluent in Polish and French . If I was lost in Moscow , I could find my way to the Canadian embassy or airport . I wouldn't mind getting a handle on Basque and Armenian .
My grandparents spoke Polish and would drift off into Polish when they talked.

My dad understood Polish but didn't speak it. When he was a kit they had a dog that only understood Polish commands.
 

k_50

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It's good to keep the mind active.

That said, studying a given language (or musical idiom) is great; what really helps is immersion. Babies don't learn languages because someone gives them a dictionary and grammar book. They learn by picking up cues from the sounds around them and emulating what gets them what they need. So immerse yourself to the maximum extent possible and don't be afraid of making mistakes.
QFT
I was part of a cultural exchange/performance program as a teenager, and at 15 went on a two week trip - one week in France, and one week in Portugal - where some 100 kids of 5-6 nationalities participated in various workshops to put together, and perform a show.
Within that one week in France, my French went from knowing phrases I'd learnt in school to being able to hold a conversation. The French kids around my age had just started having English lessons (I started at 10yo), and really wanted to practice. So we came to an arrangement where I spoke French, and they spoke English - In that way we were equally bad at each language, and could correct each other when needed.
Also, between English being the common language, and us Danes hanging out a lot with the British kids, who we knew from previous trips, I started dreaming in English during the second week. And we would inadvertently speak English among ourselves.
 

bigbonzo

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I think we should all be learning how to say ' please' and 'thank you ' in Chinese .

English is my primary language but I'm reasonably fluent in Polish and French . If I was lost in Moscow , I could find my way to the Canadian embassy or airport . I wouldn't mind getting a handle on Basque and Armenian .
Xie xie, is thank you in Chinese, I believe.
 

drummer5359

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What are your impressions on the Babble system? How do you think it compares with other language courses?? Thanks

I'm only a few days in, but so far I like it a lot.

I like how they have it structured. They give you a little bit, then build on it. Then you review. You can repeat anything at any time. It is made simple.

And frankly, I was stunned by how inexpensive it is.
 
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5 Style

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Good luck with that. I've learned a bit of Spanish over the years, in college classes and then in a couple of other non-credit type classes post-college. Some people really have a natural knack for that sort of thing, but for a lot of us, maybe even most it takes a LOT of effort. Unfortunately I didn't have the kind of dedication and followthrough to learn this stuff very well, even though I really love the idea of it. Cerainy knowing other languages can open a lot of doors. I certainly WISH that I knew several languages!

As for learning later in life, I think that it's definitely possible and at least for some of us we actually learn better when we're older than when we were young. I'm a bit dyslexic and ADD and I feel that at least with certain types of things that I am able to actually focus better and learn more than when I was young...
 
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lamartee

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I dig it!!!! I have been trying to learn Yiddish, but not many relatives left who actually speak it!!! LOL
Hey Dumpy! Didn't know you were a lonsman. Except for the Hasidism, its a dying language. Its up to us Alta Cockers to keep it alive.
Zie Gezundt!
lamartee Mendel Yaakov
 

RogersLudwig

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Fabulous! Learning a new language as an adult can be difficult, but so rewarding.

I took a few years of Spanish in high school, but forgot most all of it. then in my 40s I returned to school and took a masters and PhD in Andean archaeology and had to learn it all over. It was hard and still is, but I was just elected Secretary of the Institute of Andean Studies (https://instituteofandeanstudies.org). Now I have pressure to communicate with folks in South America in Spanish and I treasure the opportunity. it still scares me to be left alone in rural Peru, but most people are so enthusiastic that one is trying to speak their language that they are both helpful and forgiving.

Try to find native Spanish speakers with whom you can practice. It helps immeasurably.
 


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