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BennyK

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Whew !! I was 17(?) or so , me and my girlfriend were tripping heavy on very powerful windowpane acid . @ 3 in the morning and it wouldn't quit so we went for a walk over to the school yard at the end of her block and decided to throw around a frisbee , play on the swings etc .

Cop pulls up and just watches us . Finally gestures us over to the cruiser . In a language neither of us could understand tells us to get in, he'll drive us home . Nice fellow, but he turned into this really weird alien like creature on the ride back . We ended up listening to the sountrack from A Clockwork Orange until the sun came up .

Could have been worse .
 
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hsosdrum

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Whew !! I was 17(?) or so , me and my girlfriend were tripping heavy on very powerful windowpane acid . @ 3 in the morning and it wouldn't quit so we went for a walk over to the school yard at the end of her block and decided to throw around a frisbee , play on the swings etc .

Cop pulls up and just watches us . Finally gestures us over to the cruiser . In a language neither of us could understand tells us to get in, he'll drive us home . Nice fellow, but he turned into this really weird alien like creature on the ride back . We ended up listening to the sountrack from A Clockwork Orange until the sun came up .

Could have been worse .
This makes me wish we had a flying saucer reaction emoji — a simple thumbs-up just doesn't quite cut it.
 

DBT

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Squirrel Man

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Someone I knew lost a leg jumping freight trains when we were young . Stupid is as stupid does .
Yeah, some of the stuff we did when we were kids makes me wonder why I'm still around.

We lived near a huge railroad yard next to a steel mill in Pittsburgh. Coal and coke cars would pass under a foot bridge from the main street to a little hollow of a community. We'd jump off that bridge into moving coal cars. And the usual hopping trains for rides and going butt over tin cups jumping off after it picked up speed.
 

No.15

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Totally random but the framing on my garage started today, almost exactly 1 year behind schedule. There will be a lift, space for my cars, an office and a band practice area. Can't wait for it to be finished.

View attachment 590888
More progress, practice/office space in the back. Or maybe I'll just put my drums in the big bay :)
20221119_165837.jpg

20221119_165831.jpg

20221119_165116.jpg
 

drummer5359

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In the summer of 1971, I was twelve years old. I was going somewhere with my parents, sitting in the back of my Father's Javelin. We were sitting at a railroad crossing waiting for a particularly long and slow train to go past.

My Father was a department head at the P &LE RR. His Father and several of my uncles had been railroaders. He started working in the rail yards when he was young and worked his way up through the company.

As we were waiting for the incredibly slow-moving train to go by, my father explained to me how to correctly jump on and off of a train. (There is a right way to do it.) My mom rolled her eyes...

Later that week some friends of mine and I were walking along a set of railroad tracks on our way to some woods that we were going to explore. By chance, a long slow train happened by. I told my buddies that my dad had explained the right way to jump on and off of a train, then I tried it. I jumped on, and then I jumped off. (It worked!) My friend Jim tried it, and then Tom. Then all of us jumped on and decided to ride it to the woods. We were all hanging off of a ladder on the back of a box car, laughing and thinking how cool this was.

And then it sped up.

We were not laughing anymore. We ended up getting off of the train in Youngstown Ohio. We found a phone booth next to a corner store. I called my house collect. My father had to call off of work from his part time job to drive to Youngstown to rescue us. It was a loooong ride home.

My mom passed away in early 1976, when I was 16. My father passed away three and a half years later, when I was twenty. At my father's funeral my dad's boss pulled me aside. He said, "You're the youngest? The one who hopped the train? I told him that I was. He said that as much trouble as I was in over that, my father was in a lot more. My mom was sitting next to him when he explained how to hop a train. She was less than amused.

Despite this, my dad's boss said that it was my dad's favorite story. Apparently, he told everyone about his crazy twelve-year-old son accidentally hopping a train to Youngstown with two of his buddies. He thought that it was hilarious.
 

Squirrel Man

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In the summer of 1971, I was twelve years old. I was going somewhere with my parents, sitting in the back of my Father's Javelin. We were sitting at a railroad crossing waiting for a particularly long and slow train to go past.

My Father was a department head at the P &LE RR. His Father and several of my uncles had been railroaders. He started working in the rail yards when he was young and worked his way up through the company.

As we were waiting for the incredibly slow-moving train to go by, my father explained to me how to correctly jump on and off of a train. (There is a right way to do it.) My mom rolled her eyes...

Later that week some friends of mine and I were walking along a set of railroad tracks on our way to some woods that we were going to explore. By chance, a long slow train happened by. I told my buddies that my dad had explained the right way to jump on and off of a train, then I tried it. I jumped on, and then I jumped off. (It worked!) My friend Jim tried it, and then Tom. Then all of us jumped on and decided to ride it to the woods. We were all hanging off of a ladder on the back of a box car, laughing and thinking how cool this was.

And then it sped up.

We were not laughing anymore. We ended up getting off of the train in Youngstown Ohio. We found a phone booth next to a corner store. I called my house collect. My father had to call off of work from his part time job to drive to Youngstown to rescue us. It was a loooong ride home.

My mom passed away in early 1976, when I was 16. My father passed away three and a half years later, when I was twenty. At my father's funeral my dad's boss pulled me aside. He said, "You're the youngest? The one who hopped the train? I told him that I was. He said that as much trouble as I was in over that, my father was in a lot more. My mom was sitting next to him when he explained how to hop a train. She was less than amused.

Despite this, my dad's boss said that it was my dad's favorite story. Apparently, he told everyone about his crazy twelve-year-old son accidentally hopping a train to Youngstown with two of his buddies. He thought that it was hilarious.
What a story!
 

D. B. Cooper

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bob e michael

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In the summer of 1971, I was twelve years old. I was going somewhere with my parents, sitting in the back of my Father's Javelin. We were sitting at a railroad crossing waiting for a particularly long and slow train to go past.

My Father was a department head at the P &LE RR. His Father and several of my uncles had been railroaders. He started working in the rail yards when he was young and worked his way up through the company.

As we were waiting for the incredibly slow-moving train to go by, my father explained to me how to correctly jump on and off of a train. (There is a right way to do it.) My mom rolled her eyes...

Later that week some friends of mine and I were walking along a set of railroad tracks on our way to some woods that we were going to explore. By chance, a long slow train happened by. I told my buddies that my dad had explained the right way to jump on and off of a train, then I tried it. I jumped on, and then I jumped off. (It worked!) My friend Jim tried it, and then Tom. Then all of us jumped on and decided to ride it to the woods. We were all hanging off of a ladder on the back of a box car, laughing and thinking how cool this was.

And then it sped up.

We were not laughing anymore. We ended up getting off of the train in Youngstown Ohio. We found a phone booth next to a corner store. I called my house collect. My father had to call off of work from his part time job to drive to Youngstown to rescue us. It was a loooong ride home.

My mom passed away in early 1976, when I was 16. My father passed away three and a half years later, when I was twenty. At my father's funeral my dad's boss pulled me aside. He said, "You're the youngest? The one who hopped the train? I told him that I was. He said that as much trouble as I was in over that, my father was in a lot more. My mom was sitting next to him when he explained how to hop a train. She was less than amused.

Despite this, my dad's boss said that it was my dad's favorite story. Apparently, he told everyone about his crazy twelve-year-old son accidentally hopping a train to Youngstown with two of his buddies. He thought that it was hilarious.
ggreat story .... my dad was also a railroader .... he was an engineer for , 40 years with the cnr
 

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BennyK

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