OT RANT about Audi!!!

Joe61

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Is the rumor true that service right up guys get a commission for selling service?
 

JDA

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you mean additional service; probably; why not;
don't think it pertains to scheduled maintenance; but if you want a Fall or Spring check up in-between
 

Cauldronics

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When a bulb or something minor goes out, my first step is getting on youtube to find out if it’s tricky to DIY or not. In fact, I did this and decided to swap out the dome and license plate lights with modern LEDs that will probably never need to be replaced. Total cost @ $25 and a half hour of my time.

When I ponder the newfangled lighting systems of cars more modern than my ‘07 Corolla, I have to wonder why anyone thought it was a good idea to incorporate a mechanism any more advanced than a light cover than can be popped out and a bulb that can be easily replaced.

I’ll also bet that if you found the appropriate bulb at the auto parts store and popped it in, it would work and you’d save $1495 by not buying into the dealership’s bogus claim.

If I’m wrong then I’m truly flabbergasted by the necessity of an unduly complicated system to operate a light bulb in the dome of a car.
 
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Rotarded

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Is the rumor true that service right up guys get a commission for selling service?
Yes, the industry shifted from Salary plus Commission, to almost all Commission well over a decade ago. Techs are paid by the hours of work sold, not the actual hours worked, so it is their interest to find sellable service and repairs as well.

I left the industry when I was tasked with altering employee's pay structures to force them to sell the customers items they did not need (engine oil flush was the trend at the time) for $10 a pop commissions.
 

Cauldronics

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I know more than one person who’s taken their car to the dealership for regularly scheduled maintenance and well beyond.

In one example, the car is a Honda CR-V with 186k miles that runs like a top… never had any serious problems. The other was a Volvo S40 that ran great when it was new and became a money pit in the following 12 years. That car was taken to the dealership for maintenance the whole time too.

That underscores the question and value of having a reputable mechanic when the car is an unreliable heap that won’t last in the first place.

Unless willingly buying a fun to drive car with the knowledge that it’ll spend a lot of time in the hands of a mechanic, I can’t see a valid reason to complain if the car turns out to be unreliable and costly to own.

There are plenty of resources out there to help anyone make an educated decision when buying a car.

That said if I had the cash to burn and liked some shiny vehicle enough to put up with the disappointments, I’d probably get one too. But I’d also have a Corolla when I needed to be somewhere.
 

Matched Gripper

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I have a close friend here where I live that had has a 1 year old GMC Denali, the LED strip in the right side tail light fail. It was under warranty but he saw the tail light lens replacement part was over $800 for a tail light and that didn't include the labor. A tail light lens that is unserviceable to change lights out yourself, and to change a bulb you change the lens for over $800. Engineers for GM that thought that was a good idea ought to be drawn and quartered! American cars aren't any different really when it comes to cost. I have an older 2010 GMC Denali that I have had since new. It has been a great truck in everyway other than the fact that anything that has gone wrong with it that I can't fix myself is always over a $1,000... I have just excepted that fact that that is the way it is.
It was the officers/directors who thought it was a good idea, not the engineers.
 

Cauldronics

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Yes, the industry shifted from Salary plus Commission, to almost all Commission well over a decade ago. Techs are paid by the hours of work sold, not the actual hours worked, so it is their interest to find sellable service and repairs as well.

I left the industry when I was tasked with altering employee's pay structures to force them to sell the customers items they did not need (engine oil flush was the trend at the time) for $10 a pop commissions.
That is a revealing piece of information.
 

TrickRoll

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I have owned six German cars and all have been reliable. My other cars were OK but lots of little things.

Value is subjective. I love my German cars and am prepared to pay for the service as it is required.

For me they are worth it, but I totally understand the logic of buying a Toyota or Honda.

And once I retire I may start looking to the East, as well.
 

jansara

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French cared if you could carry Bread sticks and eggs across a farm field ; ) (Deux Cheveau 2CV or self-leveling Citroen
During my road years I logged thousands of miles in a full-size Citroen DS. I've owned top-of-the-line Buicks, Olds, Caddies, and Lincolns. The DS blew them all away for comfort, ride, road manners, you name it. (Except for a slightly modified Riv with the 455... )
 
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Topsy Turvy

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I see nothing fun about the prospect of owning even the most outrageously exotic car imaginable (ie: Pagani?), just to spend all of its road time sitting in a traffic jam, which has become 24/7/365 around here.

PS: Give me a comfortable ergonomic seat, automatic transmission (no CVTs please), great A/C and a killer sound system and I’m happy.
I can respect that. Where I live, it isn't all traffic jams (although that is becoming more commonplace) so I enjoy driving my Mini on twisting curvy roads. By the way, I bought my Mini Cooper S when it was 3 years old. It had been a leased vehicle so it had fewer than 18K on it. The car is fully loaded (except it does not have navigation) and I spent less than $20K on it. I have spent less than $1000 on repairs (including oil changes) in the 2 years I have owned the car. In my mind, it has absolutely been worth the money.

My wife had a Toyota Highlander, which I think is more along the lines of what you are talking about. It was definitely a better car to drive in a traffic jam, but it sucked to park and the gas mileage was crappy. My wife wanted a smaller car that got good gas mileage, thus we bought the Honda Fit.
 

Matched Gripper

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I can respect that. Where I live, it isn't all traffic jams (although that is becoming more commonplace) so I enjoy driving my Mini on twisting curvy roads. By the way, I bought my Mini Cooper S when it was 3 years old. It had been a leased vehicle so it had fewer than 18K on it. The car is fully loaded (except it does not have navigation) and I spent less than $20K on it. I have spent less than $1000 on repairs (including oil changes) in the 2 years I have owned the car. In my mind, it has absolutely been worth the money.

My wife had a Toyota Highlander, which I think is more along the lines of what you are talking about. It was definitely a better car to drive in a traffic jam, but it sucked to park and the gas mileage was crappy. My wife wanted a smaller car that got good gas mileage, thus we bought the Honda Fit.
Hondas are actually great handling cars. Used to be even better. Last Toyota I owned was an 84’ Cressida. Great car! They don’t make anything like it now.
 

Pat A Flafla

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Hondas are actually great handling cars. Used to be even better. Last Toyota I owned was an 84’ Cressida. Great car! They don’t make anything like it now.
My Supra's 5M-GE straight 6 came from a donor Cressida. As for great handling Hondas, I had a Prelude that handled like a dream. I've driven Civics and Integras that handled great too. The Fit's steering feels a bit squirrely to me. It feels like driving Lowly the Worm's apple car. My daughter said it feels like driving a pecan.
 

noreastbob

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I have owned six German cars and all have been reliable. My other cars were OK but lots of little things.

Value is subjective. I love my German cars and am prepared to pay for the service as it is required.

For me they are worth it, but I totally understand the logic of buying a Toyota or Honda.

And once I retire I may start looking to the East, as well.
While I admit the driving experience with an Audi or BMW, Mercedes too, is superlative... it is properly reserved for those with pockets deep enough to accommodate the haughty Teutonic service regime.
"But sir, you must understand vee must jack zee engine several inches to change zee oil filter... silly American!!!"
I'll stick with my 4runner with almost 100,000 mi. and not so much as a rattle. Rear brakes is all I've had to do in 5+ years.
 

ThomFloor

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Honestly? Because most Japanese/Korean/US made cars are boring to drive. Yes, you have to pay more for repairs for German-made cars, but generally speaking, they provide a much more enjoyable experience for the driver/passenger.
All relative, and opinion. I mean I owned a VW when I lived in Germany, and a Toyota 4 Runner living in Canada, and the 4Runner was old, noisy and WAY more fun to drive.
Do you think a 4 wheeler type guy likes driving a Mercedes, or a distinguished businessman likes driving an F150?
 
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RobbiefromAtlanta

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I‘ll say it again, I drive German/English cars because they make fun to drive cars. If America or Japan or Korea made cars that matched my needs/wants and I enjoyed driving, I’d absolutely buy one. For example, I owned a Miata for 15 years and loved it.

I own a Honda Fit. I hate driving it, and I mean loathe it. However, it gets great gas mileage and my wife likes it. Personally, I could care less about the status of a car. It literally means nothing to me. If Hyundai made a car that I loved to drive, I’d buy it tomorrow.
Wow man did I hit a nerve? I wasn’t directing that at you or anyone here. It’s true though. A car is a status symbol for a lot of people showing others that they’ve made it or at least to make people think they have. I own a Fit and I love it. It’s not a high performance car but it gets me and my drums where I need to go.
 

Vistalite Black

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It's not necessarily of a higher-performing car being a "status symbol."

For example, when getting on the highway, I'd rather be in something that doesn't take 17 seconds to travel a quarter-mile.

Others who deal with lots of snow or ice probably prefer to have AWD or 4WD.
 

Mayan

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I’ve leased four Audis, including this one. I’ve never paid much at all to maintain them, new brakes is about it. They were leased and everything was covered. I bought this one after the lease ended a year ago, because it’s a 2017 S5, the last year before the redesign (the S5 body remained unchanged for a decade), and the last year they offered a manual gearbox.

Only two of them with a stick came to California where I live, and I got this one. It’s really a lot of fun to drive. And if I ever get tired of it, someone will buy. I bought an extended warranty, but the dome light isn’t covered. The new engine mounts however, are.
4A963539-2C30-4583-A329-ADF5EE6DCA40.jpeg
 

dsop

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When I used to own Porsches, I was treated very fairly at the dealership service centers. Actually, better than fairly. Twice I tried going to independent service shops (well known ones too), and both times they did horrible work.
I've been driving a VW GTI for five years, and get it serviced at the dealership yearly with no problems. My wife's AUDI is a bit of a different story. One dealership was horrible, but the one near my VW dealership has been fine.
 

Downbeat

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I’ve been in the parts business for 30+ years and have worked for almost every manufacturer (VW, Audi, Mercedes, BMW and Porsche included), at one time or another. Yes German parts can be expensive but they don’t hold a candle to Toyota. I’ve been at a Toyota store for the last 3 years now and I’m blown away by their parts pricing.
 

Topsy Turvy

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Wow man did I hit a nerve? I wasn’t directing that at you or anyone here. It’s true though. A car is a status symbol for a lot of people showing others that they’ve made it or at least to make people think they have. I own a Fit and I love it. It’s not a high performance car but it gets me and my drums where I need to go.
No nerve hit, man. I just think people who make sweeping generalizations should be called out on them. I’m certain that for some German cars are status cymbals. As is the case for some people and Ford F-150 trucks. But to make sweeping generalizations about all people who own German cars (or F150s) is inaccurate.
 


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