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OT - Sleep Apnea -- UPDATE on page 2

ConvertedLudwigPlayer

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I know someone else had a recent thread on this topic, but I wanted to talk about 2 specific treatments and not hijack osmeone else's thread.

I had my sleep study over the weekend and my follow up consultation yesterday. As expected, I have a mild sleep apnea.

My options are:
1. Surgery to shave off some of the soft tissue in my mouth, uvala, etc. The doctor doesn't recommend this as scar tissue builds up and is only 30-50% effective in most cases. It seems more like a short term band-aid at best.
2. Lose 10-15% of my bodyweight. I am at 200 pounds and have picked up about 15 pounds over the last year dueti the stress of my father faling health and his passing; some sports injury, etc. I will lsoe the 15 pounds eventually. Weight loss can help reduce it by around 25% if I recall correctly.
3. Dental appliance
4. CPAP machine, which is considered the gold standard treatment for sleep apnea.

My insurance will cover 100% on the CPAP and supplies afterI meet my deductible. I assume it will provide similar coverage for the dental appliance. So, luckily for me, cost is not an issue, thankfully.

I am leaning toward the CPAP and will likely opt for a nasal pillow. Of course, once I go try the various masks, I may find the nasal pillow not to my liking. But,that is my early leaning based on looking at some online. I tend to sleep on both sides, my back, and am a partial stomach sleeper in that I will slide a body pillow beside me and stretch one of my legs over it making me be partially on my stomach.

In theory, the dental appliance seems like a good option - no noise from a machine, no hoses to deal with, etc. But, the comfort is a concern.

Has anyone used a dental appliance from your dentist?

Does anyone have a mask they particularly love or hate? If so, why?

Thanks!
 

chollyred

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This is the mask I'm using...The Resmed Swift LT. Comfortable, pretty quiet. But as with most all of the masks, there is a vent that blows straight out from your face. My wife hates that, so I sleep with a pillow between us to keep that air flow off of her.

resmed-swift-lt-cpap-mask-2.jpg
 

Sequimite

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Don't mess with sleep apnea folks. The lowered oxygen levels over time can cause permanent brain damage.

I was only given CPAP as a choice and I went with the nose "pillow" instead of a regular mask. Discomfort for a week and no problems since. I'm overweight and am losing with the hope that I can get off the machine by the time I can get a boat in a couple of years but that may not work. I'm surprised how many skinny people I know with sleep apnea.

edit- chollyred, that is the mask I use and I also have the pillow between myself and my wife
 

ConvertedLudwigPlayer

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dtk

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I was diagnosed with a low level problem and told I need the dental appliance (per the dentist, i have a size 5 tongue in a size 4 mouth, it folds back and blocks the airway if I'm on my back)

...but my health care wouldn't cover it as its a dental device and my dental only covers normal procedures.

i've lost weight, i try and sleep on my side....
 

ConvertedLudwigPlayer

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dtk said:
I was diagnosed with a low level problem and told I need the dental appliance (per the dentist, i have a size 5 tongue in a size 4 mouth, it folds back and blocks the airway if I'm on my back)

...but my health care wouldn't cover it as its a dental device and my dental only covers normal procedures.

i've lost weight, i try and sleep on my side....
That's a shame about the insurance. Lots of things go untreated, yet the insurance companies have no problem in collecting their premiums.

The lady that handles the equipment and insurance at my doctor's office told me that the insurance companies now make people rent the cpap machines instead of doing outright purchases as they did in the past. If people aren't using them for something like 70% of the time, they do not offer the reimbursement for that month. There is a chip inside that is gathering info on various things so they can also monitor usage and whether or not insurance will cover it.

Glad to hear you have lost weight. That is always tough to do.
 

xsabers

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Sequimite said:
Don't mess with sleep apnea folks. The lowered oxygen levels over time can cause permanent brain damage...
This is very true! There have even been documented case studies where drummers suffering from untreated severe sleep apnea had done such irreparable damage to their brains that they had to become bass players!
 

xsabers

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ConvertedLudwigPlayer said:
I know someone else had a recent thread on this topic, but I wanted to talk about 2 specific treatments and not hijack osmeone else's thread.

I had my sleep study over the weekend and my follow up consultation yesterday. As expected, I have a mild sleep apnea.

My options are:
1. Surgery to shave off some of the soft tissue in my mouth, uvala, etc. The doctor doesn't recommend this as scar tissue builds up and is only 30-50% effective in most cases. It seems more like a short term band-aid at best.
2. Lose 10-15% of my bodyweight. I am at 200 pounds and have picked up about 15 pounds over the last year dueti the stress of my father faling health and his passing; some sports injury, etc. I will lsoe the 15 pounds eventually. Weight loss can help reduce it by around 25% if I recall correctly.
3. Dental appliance
4. CPAP machine, which is considered the gold standard treatment for sleep apnea.

My insurance will cover 100% on the CPAP and supplies afterI meet my deductible. I assume it will provide similar coverage for the dental appliance. So, luckily for me, cost is not an issue, thankfully.

I am leaning toward the CPAP and will likely opt for a nasal pillow. Of course, once I go try the various masks, I may find the nasal pillow not to my liking. But,that is my early leaning based on looking at some online. I tend to sleep on both sides, my back, and am a partial stomach sleeper in that I will slide a body pillow beside me and stretch one of my legs over it making me be partially on my stomach.

In theory, the dental appliance seems like a good option - no noise from a machine, no hoses to deal with, etc. But, the comfort is a concern.

Has anyone used a dental appliance from your dentist?

Does anyone have a mask they particularly love or hate? If so, why?

Thanks!
For mild apnea, I would first look into the dental appliance. I've heard good things and they are easy to travel with and don't impact your sleep position adjustments. A CPAP will work, but if it isn't necessary, I would think the simpler route might be better. Either way, drop the weight over time and that will solve a myriad of issues. Good luck!
 

ConvertedLudwigPlayer

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xsabers said:
I know someone else had a recent thread on this topic, but I wanted to talk about 2 specific treatments and not hijack osmeone else's thread.

I had my sleep study over the weekend and my follow up consultation yesterday. As expected, I have a mild sleep apnea.

My options are:
1. Surgery to shave off some of the soft tissue in my mouth, uvala, etc. The doctor doesn't recommend this as scar tissue builds up and is only 30-50% effective in most cases. It seems more like a short term band-aid at best.
2. Lose 10-15% of my bodyweight. I am at 200 pounds and have picked up about 15 pounds over the last year dueti the stress of my father faling health and his passing; some sports injury, etc. I will lsoe the 15 pounds eventually. Weight loss can help reduce it by around 25% if I recall correctly.
3. Dental appliance
4. CPAP machine, which is considered the gold standard treatment for sleep apnea.

My insurance will cover 100% on the CPAP and supplies afterI meet my deductible. I assume it will provide similar coverage for the dental appliance. So, luckily for me, cost is not an issue, thankfully.

I am leaning toward the CPAP and will likely opt for a nasal pillow. Of course, once I go try the various masks, I may find the nasal pillow not to my liking. But,that is my early leaning based on looking at some online. I tend to sleep on both sides, my back, and am a partial stomach sleeper in that I will slide a body pillow beside me and stretch one of my legs over it making me be partially on my stomach.

In theory, the dental appliance seems like a good option - no noise from a machine, no hoses to deal with, etc. But, the comfort is a concern.

Has anyone used a dental appliance from your dentist?

Does anyone have a mask they particularly love or hate? If so, why?

Thanks!
For mild apnea, I would first look into the dental appliance. I've heard good things and they are easy to travel with and don't impact your sleep position adjustments. A CPAP will work, but if it isn't necessary, I would think the simpler route might be better. Either way, drop the weight over time and that will solve a myriad of issues. Good luck!
Thanks XSabers.
 

H.M.

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I have severe sleep apnea. I use a CPAP machine and an oxygen machine at night. It's been a godsend but it took about a year for me to get used to sleeping with a mask. I also tried several masks before settling on one I liked. The key to using a CPAP mask is to be patient and give yourself time to get used to it. I had to force myself and I'm glad I did. I now look at the mask and CPAP machine as a security blanket.
 

ConvertedLudwigPlayer

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H.M., my cousin loves his CPAP. He said he sleeps better than ever and that it will change my life. What type of mask do you use?

I am leaning toward the machine, but would love to hear from users of the dental appliance, too, to make sure I am not overlooking a potential option.
 

devinw

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I apparently snore loud but probably have mild sleep apnea. I got a dental appliance, which works well because I also grind my teeth. It helps a lot. I just need to never sleep on my back. That's when problems happen!
 

Pickinator

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I am personally not all that impressed with the dental devices, especially the ones that reposition the mandible forward. It can cause TMJ problems over the long term. There are some folks that are happy with them. For what it's worth, I have never been asked by a patient to make one for them.

My father suffered a heart attack due to sleep apnea. His arteries were clean as a whistle.
 

skywkr2

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I use a CPAP. I tried a dental appliance and it hurt my jaw. I have been on the CPAP for 15 years. I love it! I had gastric bypass surgery and lost 80 lbs and stopped snoring but I still use the machine because i sleep better with it. My doctor said even if you stop snoring, you still may have apnea so ... Getting used to the machine was easy for me...just let yourself go. Now, i know i adjust the hose and never even wake up. Good luck
 

ConvertedLudwigPlayer

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skywkr2 said:
I use a CPAP. I tried a dental appliance and it hurt my jaw. I have been on the CPAP for 15 years. I love it! I had gastric bypass surgery and lost 80 lbs and stopped snoring but I still use the machine because i sleep better with it. My doctor said even if you stop snoring, you still may have apnea so ... Getting used to the machine was easy for me...just let yourself go. Now, i know i adjust the hose and never even wake up. Good luck
This is my concern with the dental appliance. Did you have the adjustable type?
 

H.M.

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I'm not sure what kind of mask it is. It fits over my nose. Not too big or too small. I tried several and actually settled on the first one I tried. It's improved my life tremendously.
 

Drumstickdude

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Just saying I have some sleep apnea,- scared me a bit a couple of times. It's nice to hear all these ideas with treatment possibilities if it gets really bad.
 

ConvertedLudwigPlayer

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My average time not breathing was about 20 seconds at 12.7 times per hour, the longest duration was 45.5 seconds. I had no idea it was that frequent or long. Scary stuff.
 

On the one

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I have the full mask looking like Darth Vader. In the beginning it was tough air blowing in your face is not normal especially when you're trying to sleep. I got used to it now no big deal. Just make sure you change your filters and clean your mask/tube and water chamber.
 

Drums

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Really feeling old right about now. Two of my last three posts are dealing with old age problems! Oh well, I feel pretty damn good overall, and I still think I'm about thirty in my head.

Just in case you go for the CPAP (or APAP), this Airfit P10 is the lightest weight mask out there.
 


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