OT the most educated states in the US

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Tornado

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It has become the "thing" to knock college education these days, and possibly with some good reason (due partially to the exorbitant fees charged by Universities nowadays) but back when me and all my buddies were teen-agers, it was the accepted thing that you went to college after you got out of high school.

I worked my way thru college (no loans for me, just part time jobs... mostly as a Janitor!) and eventually, after 7 years and a few drop-out semesters, I got a bachelor's degree from NAU in Flagstaff Arizona in 1978. I had a great time at the University, did some partying, played in cool bands and learned country drumming, backpacked the Grand Canyon (Geology field trip!), and met some great hiking buddies, a few girlfriends and lotsa fellow musicians. I later went on to get two more undergraduate degrees in Art and Music. I loved my time in Flagstaff, and would not trade those years of experience, music, schooling and friends for all the tea in China.

On the other hand, I was always a fix-it guy (my dad was an electrician) and I worked for years as a music store guitar tech here in Prescott. I still work on guitars daily, I love it. Believe it or not, it is very relaxing.

Cannot fix a diesel engine (well, I never tried) but I CAN wire an electric guitar or a house, and I CAN get college degrees. Using tools/fixing things and getting educated do not have to be mutually exclusive.

PS: I really enjoyed being a janitor at NAU... work at your own pace, relaxing, listen to music while you work... not a bad gig.

I wish more people took a long view of life like this. No big deal to take 7 years or longer to earn a bachelor's degree. Life is a marathon. Do cool stuff. Be an interesting person. Your life isn't over if you don't get it right by your 22nd birthday.
 

Mcjnic

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I wish more people took a long view of life like this. No big deal to take 7 years or longer to earn a bachelor's degree. Life is a marathon. Do cool stuff. Be an interesting person. Your life isn't over if you don't get it right by your 22nd birthday.

My favorite post here.
 

Mcjnic

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Right because in the end life is a education .

Absolutely.
Some learn and excel and activate "wisdom" ... while others are stuck in remediation shackled to a fidgit-spinner.
 

Mcjnic

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I have to admit if it wasn’t for drum sticks I’d have one in every color .

I literally just got an order in on a case of fidget-spinners bearing the logo of my animated series. I may be spinning these like crazy.
 

Squirrel Man

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It dang in the sure heck ain’t Oklahoma !!
Wisdom does not equal intelligence or education, that I know from life experience.

Been in the hospital business for eh, 30 years maybe. The for profit hospital systems are based roughly in the south, Brentwood TN I believe and I can tell you first hand these guys sound like M E S S kickers but that's all a ruse. They will buy you dinner and show you to the door with a smile if you're not on your game.
 

ppfd

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It has become the "thing" to knock college education these days, and possibly with some good reason (due partially to the exorbitant fees charged by Universities nowadays) but back when me and all my buddies were teen-agers, it was the accepted thing that you went to college after you got out of high school.

I worked my way thru college (no loans for me, just part time jobs... mostly as a Janitor!) and eventually, after 7 years and a few drop-out semesters, I got a bachelor's degree from NAU in Flagstaff Arizona in 1978. I had a great time at the University, did some partying, played in cool bands and learned country drumming, backpacked the Grand Canyon (Geology field trip!), and met some great hiking buddies, a few girlfriends and lotsa fellow musicians. I later went on to get two more undergraduate degrees in Art and Music. I loved my time in Flagstaff, and would not trade those years of experience, music, schooling and friends for all the tea in China.

On the other hand, I was always a fix-it guy (my dad was an electrician) and I worked for years as a music store guitar tech here in Prescott. I still work on guitars daily, I love it. Believe it or not, it is very relaxing.

Cannot fix a diesel engine (well, I never tried) but I CAN wire an electric guitar or a house, and I CAN get college degrees. Using tools/fixing things and getting educated do not have to be mutually exclusive.

PS: I really enjoyed being a janitor at NAU... work at your own pace, relaxing, listen to music while you work... not a bad gig.
Pretty much my story. I got my EMT cert, then Paramedic Cert. Went to work in the fire service and became an instructor. Which in short was a teaching cert that would allow me to teach in a vocational school. I much preferred teaching young men and women entering the fire service.
Got the bright idea to go to nursing school as a "retirement job". I worked full time and had a child to raise so school was part time in the evenings. I traded shifts, and paid out of pocket, never took a loan. As another poster mentioned there is no race to earn your education. I finished with my bachelors in nursing last year. Total time? I'm guessing 10 years. I got an associates in nursing first. Then did the bachelors on line.
All paid out of pocket.
I can relate and agree with a few ideas presented in this thread. One does not need a college education to be successful or make a great living. No matter how advanced we become, someone is always going to have to "fix and build things".
My granddad got a finance/accounting degree with his GI bill after WW2. He hated office work and went on to work for Chrysler for over 30 years making car parts. He also owned and ran a heating and cooling business with a sheet metal shop, while working at Chrysler.
Sheet metal, now there is a dying trade I bet. He could wire, plumb and build with wood as well. My dad was in the Yugoslavian Army for over 10 years right after WW2 and became a Tailor another lost art. He was very proud of making custom suits and had many big name clients in the northern Ohio area.

Yeah I'll probably anger a few here. my issue with college is why should the government right off or pay off your loan? I paid my way like many others. No one is paying off your car, credit cards or home note. Why should your education bill be any different. I've worked with people that are proud of the fact they used their loan money for everything but school.
 

flatwins

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I live in flyover country and we definitely aren’t high up on that list. The closest a lot of people get to college around here is buying a hat with their favorite college football team’s logo at Walmart.

Having said that I grew up in an era when my blue collar dad stated not “if” you boys (my brother and I) but “when” you go to college. Ironically my blue collar dad received an excellent retirement from the railroad, probably much better than most of us in corporate America will ever see.

Yes I have a degree and though I’m glad I do as it was more of a goal completion thing than anything else but if I had to do it all over again I’d probably take a different path. I told my two kids from when they were old enough to listen that college in the modern world is largely a crock. My son did 2 years at one before deciding that it really wasn’t his thing and now he’s in technical school.

I see a lot of electricians and plumbers hauling boats to their lake houses on the weekends. The trades aren’t a bad way to go.
 

DBT

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I live in flyover country and we definitely aren’t high up on that list. The closest a lot of people get to college around here is buying a hat with their favorite college football team’s logo at Walmart.

Having said that I grew up in an era when my blue collar dad stated not “if” you boys (my brother and I) but “when” you go to college. Ironically my blue collar dad received an excellent retirement from the railroad, probably much better than most of us in corporate America will ever see.

Yes I have a degree and though I’m glad I do as it was more of a goal completion thing than anything else but if I had to do it all over again I’d probably take a different path. I told my two kids from when they were old enough to listen that college in the modern world is largely a crock. My son did 2 years at one before deciding that it really wasn’t his thing and now he’s in technical school.

I see a lot of electricians and plumbers hauling boats to their lake houses on the weekends. The trades aren’t a bad way to go.
If the name on the boat was “Bass Turd “ it was me driving to my lake house .
 

el_37

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I think part of the reason it is a "thing" to knock college educations these days, is an entire generation or two has been sold a bag of goods about college and many are angered at the fact that they went to college and it didn't automatically guarantee them the high end living they were promised.

That same generation or two were basically told that you were a cretin if you didn't go, and only rubes and idiots became tradesmen or blue collar civil service employees. The irony being that many of these rubes are the ones with high paying jobs and/or retirement plans/savings these days. So those people generally get rubbed the wrong way when they are told by a rather large portion of society they are failures when in fact they are the farthest thing from it.

This college is mandatory attitude in the USA, has spawned many over educated morons who still have the deductive reasoning of a toddler. But hey, they have a BA in Medieval Literature now, so in their minds they are qualified to rule the world. Those are generally the people that get upset over the rube steam fitters who still have a defined benefit pension plan or the fact that a plumber makes six figures.

College is necessary for many careers- but not all. People are starting to realize that the world doesn't need another no talent lawyer who can't find work other than a paralegal or another person with a $200K debt from getting a BA in painting from Parsons who currently works in sales.

I have nothing against college- but I also think it shouldn't be forced fed to people. But with all these for profit colleges and the supporting machinery- I doubt it will go away anytime soon.
 

Topsy Turvy

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What assumptions?
(You’re, by the way.). ;)
Your entire first sentence on your original post was an assumption. “Safe spaces….etc…” That entire diatribe was basically a giant assumption.

And thanks for pointing out the typo. I was on my phone and didn’t have my glasses, so I missed it.
 

JDA

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let me tell ya about Education..



Musk lives in Texas.
 

Topsy Turvy

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Just read this ...
Imagine that ... the College Board reports that a College Education pays off.
What are the odds that that particular group would reach that particular decision?

I will just leave this here. The difference isn’t small.
 
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