Our gear when we are gone...

yetanotherdrummer

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I currently have 3 drum sets, and a fair amount of health problems that may affect my ability to play in the future.

I plan on selling 2 of the sets and keeping 1. My youngest son plays the drums so he will take that set one day.
 

AaronLatos

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I have a spreadsheet of all of my equipment and estimated value on my laptop, and my wife knows where it is.

I have an agreement with one of my closest friends (also a professional drummer), and it's clearly listed in the will. If I go first, he gets a kit&snare&ride in exchange for seeing that my kid gets a drumset (he's young, but interested in music) and then helping sell/consign/donate the rest, at the direction of my wife.

I'm 31, but realistic. We all go eventually and rarely do we know much in advance.
 

ppfd

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I’m 51, never married and haven’t played in years. When I split with my long time partner which is my daughter’s mother after 25 years. I gave my one and only kit to a friend. It wasn’t much just an old Ludwig rocker series but i sounded good. My regret there was my dad bought it for me back in the 80s.

I am still in a phase if I don’t know where I want to end up. I’d like to move and being a nurse finding work is easy. My mom and step dad are just 70 and in good health but I don’t move because of them. My daughter is on her own.

The gear I have now is a decent sized pile of hardware and cymbals along with a few snares. I need to thin the cymbals to just a few and that’s the hard part! Picking a few. I do know if I get another kit it will be used or a mid level kit. With today’s quality, not to mention overall resale I’ll probably take a beating selling off what I have.
 

Tmcfour

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I thought this was going to be security camera photage of gear when we are away doing crazy stuff like emptying the fridge and have a party...
 

Skyrm

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This is the story of my late friend Mark Hurst - I think he’d be happy with what happened to his drums:
 

Danagreg

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I am 69 have had leukemia and a heart attack and I was going to sell my drum collection and old k collection but have decided to just leave it to my son and not worry about it. Just play music.
 

Treviso1

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The "So this guy..." thread is a vivid reminder that no one gets out alive. I've told my story here before, but it bears repeating.

I was married to a woman for almost fourteen years. We both had good jobs and no children. I believe that the term for us was "DINK", duel income, no kids. I admit fully to being a workaholic, as was she. We had new cars, the big fancy house, we were successful.

My hobby was playing music. We married at age 35, I had already been playing in bands for nineteen years. My music gear was always decent, but not fancy. I was using a 1975 Slingerland kit that I bought in 1992, two years before we married. I owned a two snare drums, my primary was a 1972 Gretsch COB model 4160, My cymbals were a mix of Zildjian A and Paiste Signature. Nice stuff to be sure, but not over the top. All of my gear was bought cash with gig money.

In January of 2008 I traveled from Baltimore to Pittsburgh on business. I lined the business trip up with a gig that my guitarist brother had, I subbed for his regular drummer. At the end of the gig I had a minor stroke. I didn't realize it at the time. I worked all day the following day and got a call that there was a business emergency that required me to get back to Baltimore. I got in my company Yukon (full of drums) and headed back toward Baltimore early the following morning. On the way there I had a massive stroke. I actually drove the rest of the way to my office, I have no idea how I got there. I had to have an angel on my shoulder that day.

I survived obviously, as I'm here writing this. My wife didn't come to the hospital. Yes, you can read that sentence again. I was hospitalized due to a major stroke and she did not come to the hospital. I realized then that our marriage might have some issues. Honestly, I had no idea. She did contact the company and check to see how much life insurance I had. (She always was good about handling those things...)

Shortly after I got out of the hospital we separated and the divorce proceedings started with her in full scorched earth mode. It was lovely.

Like the guy in the "So this guy..." thread, I might have gotten a tad carried away with drum gear once I was single. I met my wonderful current wife six months later. She saw a photo of me behind my Slingerlands on a dating site and sent me a "wink". We've been together ever since, although we did wait several years before we married.

I was still having health issues and ended up retiring at age fifty in September of 2009. My love retired as well and we moved to Pittsburgh in 2010. I started gigging right away and have had a blast. Since the stroke in 2008 a lot of gear has gone through my hands. I bought it all cash and have been flipping, upgrading and using gig money. I've accumulated some pretty cool drum gear. I have a big set of DW Collector's Series, vintage Gretsch kits, vintage Slingerland kits, and now a brand new Gretsch USA Custom shell bank. My snare drums number over thirty and include Craviotto, Dunnett, Radio Kings, Black Beauties, and all manner of cool stuff. My cymbals are all Zildjian these days, K Constanoples, K Customs, Ks, and As.

The story up to now is background...

I'm sixty years old. My dad passed at age 58, my oldest brother passed at age 63, and until recently he was the longest living male in my family ever. My other older brother recently turned 64. In my family a man in his sixties needs to have things in place to ensure his family is financially stable. We are. We live in a nice house in a nice neighborhood, but live within our means.

But I have all of this gear...

I have two really close friends who are drum geeks. One is young and lives local, the other is older and lives on Long Island. I trust them both one hundred percent to help my wife dispose of my gear some day if the need arises. They both know gear as well as I do. I've helped them score cool gear over the years, they've done the same for me. I've talked to them about this and they have agreed to work together and help her.

They are good friends, I'm very lucky.
Amazing story and thank God you survived your stroke. You were lucky. Regarding your gear, start thinning the herds now...don't wait for someone else to get through the "mess." You can enjoy that extra money and travel, buy yourself a winter home, or whatever else floats your boat. You know the value, no one else will. Also, you know where everything is...no one else will. Do everyone a favor and get lighter and lighter with respect to "stuff." The goal is to die with the least amount of stuff. You won't take anything with you, trust me... You were born naked and you will die naked. Don't burden others with the task of sorting through your gear. Again, thanks for sharing that amazing story. I am glad that you are here to tell your story!
 

gbow

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After my father died, we all accused him of trying to "control us" from the grave with all his instructions and desires.. I swore at that time that I would not do the same.

So I don't worry about it, enjoy life while I can, enjoy drumming and equipment as long as I can, and let whoever is left decide what they want to do with it when I'm gone.

gabo
 

RedeyeSPR

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A couple years ago, a well known drummer from my 40,000 person city passed away. I didn't know him personally, but we had many mutual friends. He had a heart attack in his mid 60s, so it was unexpected. I happened to throw darts with his daughter. A couple weeks after he passed she asked me if I wanted his old drum magazines, which I agreed to. She brought me about 20 years worth of Modern Drummer and a full set of 8 Gretsch coffee mugs (cool!). I asked her if she needed help sorting through his gear to see what it was worth, and she told me she was going to keep it. I thought at the time he probably had one kit and she was going to store it. A couple months after that she told me she didn't have room for "all these drumsets" at her house and she would like to see what they were worth. I told her that even though I didn't know him, most drummers would love to have their equipment go to someone that would play it rather than store it, and that she could keep a couple pieces to remember him by, and I agreed to come see what he had. I arrived to a living room completely full of drums. He had 3 full Gretsch USA kits. 70s, 80s, and 90s era (all in the exact same wine red color with hard cases for everything). A 70s Tama kit in the same red, a cheaper Ludwig "Ringo" kit they had out 10 years ago, a full sized Alesis E kit with all mesh, and about 30 cymbals and stands enough for all of them. Also, 8 snares including a Tama bell brass from the 80s, a 60s era Gretsch WMP wrap, and a 70s Gretsch COB 4165. I spent 4 or so hours cataloging everything and taking pictures, then another 4 hours researching everything for current prices. (Thanks to Gretsch for the tags in every single drum). Over the course of 3 months, she listed and sold most of everything on Ebay and Craigslist for at least the current fair price and in a couple cases way more than I thought they were worth. Before she started, we talked about what she should keep. I convinced her the 60s Gretsch snare was likely his prized drum, as it looked like he played it constantly and had a really nice case with spare parts and heads. She also kept the Ringo kit because it was cheaper and she remembered that's where he practiced mostly. She was looking for sentimental value. She asked me what I wanted as payment for my time. I took a new in box cowbell and a new snare stand and that was enough for me, but she insisted on something else. She had seen me eyeing the Gretsch COB snare and offered that. I told her it was worth about $300-350 and I couldn't just take it, so we settled on $150 with a hard case. I use it whenever I can for Youtube covers and she loves to see it in action.

So...I'm not sure there is a moral to the story or anything. Possibly make sure your loved ones know someone they can trust if you have a bunch of equipment. This all worked out well for everyone after a tragic event.
 

Rufus T Firefly

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This is good food for thought.

Originally I planned on letting my son deal with my drums when I met my demise. He was a guitar player and knew a lot about the value of my kits. Unfortunately he passed away at age 27 (he was my all time best friend). My daughter and wife know nothing about drum gear and their value and they have no desire to learn. I'm 63 so I guess I should be coming up with a plan B. I just want them to go to someone who can appreciate the quality and value of the kits.
 

jtpaistegeist

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Pile all of my gear and set a funeral pyre with me on top. Done.
 

RettaW75

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I got a practically "like new" electronic drum kit from a man who passed away. He only had the kit for a year so it was in great shape. I felt kind of bad about it, but I've played the hell out of that kit and will continue to do so for years to come. I'll enjoy it on his behalf. I hope whoever he is is smiling and glad his kit is being used by someone who loves to play it as much as he probably did.
 

bethness

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SInce I collect mostly vintage pads and sticks, I will probably sell off a few things in advance, enjoy the rest, and leave it to a non-profit music school when I go. None of it is so valuable as to be worth thousands; and if the kids can get some use out of it later I am fine with that.
 

budrock

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If I go before my wife, who is 5 years younger than me, she and my daughter will handle it. I have 15 drum kits. 30+ snare drums, lots of hardware and cymbals. I have begun selling off some of my snare drums. Already sold 4 in the past few weeks on Ebay. I am looking at letting go my 67 Ludwig Champagne sparkle kit next.
 

blkcortex79

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This has been something that I has crossed my mind from time to time as the years have gone by......and as I continue to collect drums, cymbals and the like.....I'm 58 and currently gigging on a regular basis - So I guess before I get much older I better make a decision about what to do when the time comes - Thanks drummer5359 for the motivation!!
 

audiochurch

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never thought of this. maybe a snare for each of my boys, unless they really want a kit. same thing with any other family member.

sell off some gear to pay for death costs.

then i think i want to find a struggling drummer and/or band to donate gear to. maybe donate a kit to a jazz big band too so their drummer never has to bring gear.
 

CSR

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Going through my deceased father-in-law’s 4 bedroom house + full basement and attic +’full garage + motorhome + boat + cars has made me look at “stuff” differently. When we’re done there, we plan to start de-“stuffing” out house. Your treasures are often everyone else’s junk and will likely end up selling for a quarter in a household sale or in the dumpster.
 

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