Overhead mic placement

Joe61

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Depending on the type of gig, I will use anywhere from one to seven mics on the kit. Always the base drum, sometimes the hi hat and snare, and less often, three tom mics and an overhead near the ride. I am trying to simplify my setup with two condenser overheads taking the place of the three tom and one ride overhead and possibly the snare mic. I would like to know how others place their overheads. Things like right to left spacing, height, xy close spacing, close but pointed away from each other etc. Any thoughts on this to shorten my learning curve would be great.

Thanks
Joe
 

dcrigger

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Keep in mind that on tons of live gigs stereo is a non-issue. Opening the option for a single overhead being positioned more center and lower in order to have a better chance at balancing the toms with the cymbals. Especially since in all but large setting - the cymbals are usually not needing much in the way of "help".
 

jptrickster

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When I opt for the simple set up, one in the kick( at all times)
One over head condenser placed about 3’ above and pointed directly towards the rack Tom side of the main ride slot. It captures a little bit of everything and still gives me a crisp stick on my ride. The open stage mics pick up the slack in small venues. It’s not perfect but gets the job done. I bum out when someone comes up and says they couldn’t hear the toms or even worse , the bass drum. I prefer 7 mics!( and coming back at me in my monitors)
 

Joe61

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Keep in mind that on tons of live gigs stereo is a non-issue. Opening the option for a single overhead being positioned more center and lower in order to have a better chance at balancing the toms with the cymbals. Especially since in all but large setting - the cymbals are usually not needing much in the way of "help".
Thanks for the response and I agree about the stereo issue. My thought for using two mics would be better coverage of the kit. However your point about using one mic centered in the main body of the kit may help reduce a front of house mix to rich with cymbals, which makes perfect sense.

Would you ever consider placing two mics centered overhead spaced say 6" apart?
 

SteveB

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If you're going to try to capture the whole kit I would use a "large" diaphragm mic over head so you don't pull the cymbals up too much. With smaller pencil type mics you'll get a lot of snap off the batters and a good amount of sound from the cymbals. That 414 mentioned above is a great mic for capturing more of the set, plus a whole host of cheaper mics you could try which I'm not really familiar with.
 

Ray Dee Oh King

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For smaller venues, I've been running kick, snare and two OHs. Beta 91A in the kick, sE vmic or sm57 on the snare, and two small diaphragm mics(ATM450s) evenly spaced from the center of the batter head on the bass drum, and just above my height from the throne. It captures the whole kit really well. If it's too heavy on the cymbals, I can get away with simply "padding" the condensers and it works out great!
 

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