Paiste Stanople Cymbal

joon

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Does anybody know if these cymbals sound good? Sold through Leedy in the 30's 40's, made in Italy. Thanks!
 

Jim Hodgson

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There's plenty of mystery surrounding these, but I thought there was a pretty good consensus that they were made first in Germany and then later in Switzerland starting in the '50s. '30s and '40s in Italy? Are you sure?

Anyway, here's a sound file of what I think of as a pretty typical German-made Stanople: http://www.maxwelldrums.com/paiste-stanople-series-cymbal-1695g-p-7158.html

Personally, my feeling is that, if you're after a cymbal in this "family" of sounds, you're better off with almost any more modern Paiste -- especially a 602. One thing that you do get with a Stanople, though, is a (typically) very light cymbal that you can't find in the 602 line. (The one I linked to is a 20" at 1695.)
 

CaptainCrunch

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There were Italian-made "Stanoples" in the 50's. I had a pair of hats that looked awesome, but sounded clanky.

The Paistes were completely unrelated and a nickelsilver low-line from the 60's. All I've seen have been quite light and thin, but NS12 is an alloy you either dig or you don't.
 

1up2dn

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hmmm....that stanople at maxwells looks alot like my 1965 vintage paiste dixie 20 (ns12 alloy)...even the weight is close...
 

CaptainCrunch

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Dixies and Supers both seem to be close relatives of the Stanoples.

Stambuls, however, were Paiste's top line for 20 years (before the Super Formula 602's were released) and were supposed to be a pro cymbal.
They were also NS12 and are a bit on the weird side. Stambul '65 was a later, different, lower, B8 line.
 

TDM

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That Paiste cymbal Jim Hodgson linked to sounds fabulous. Nice, full crash sound and the ride has plenty of body and warmth under it without overtaking the stick sound. I love how the bell also activates the cymbal. There's not too many modern Paiste cymbals that sound like this. Tremendous deal for $200, in my opinion.

Paiste Stanople Ride (1950s) 1695 Grams
View attachment paiste_stanople.mp3
 

zenstat

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TDM said:
That Paiste cymbal Jim Hodgson linked to sounds fabulous. Nice, full crash sound and the ride sound has plenty of body and warmth under it. I love how the bell also activates the cymbal. There's not too many modern Paiste that sound like this. Tremendous deal for $200, in my opinion.

Paiste Stanople Ride (1950s) 1695 Grams
paiste_stanople.mp3
I also think it puts claims that nice cymbal can't be made out of NS12 into the "it depends on the cymbal" category rather than an absolute.

Clever grabbing the original mp3 to preserve it. I tried the other day, but couldn't justify the time to wade through all the code. But thanks to your success I've figured out how to do it in Safari (using Window>Activity for anybody curious).
 

Jim Hodgson

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Am I going to have to go back and give that one another chance? (TBH I don't remember it sounding that good in person ... LOL!)

I just PM'd TDM for a tutorial on how to grab sound files. Zen? Is it really that easy?
 

zenstat

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CaptainCrunch said:
There were Italian-made "Stanoples" in the 50's. I had a pair of hats that looked awesome, but sounded clanky.

The Paistes were completely unrelated and a nickelsilver low-line from the 60's. All I've seen have been quite light and thin, but NS12 is an alloy you either dig or you don't.
Interesting Captain,

Neither The Cymbal Book (Pinksterboer) nor Italian Vintage Drums and Cymbals (Luca Luciano) know about Stanople being produced by Italians. And it isn't on the photo Ronn Dunnett took at UFiP which shows most of the stamps they put on cymbals produced at the factory (at least I don't see it)



This site in Germany does know about Stambul as a Paiste name going back into the 1930s. No sign of Stanople until the 1950s:

http://www.nf-drums.com/paiste_fanpage_paiste_timeline.htm

So I'd be keen to know more about your Italian ones. Pics? I presume they are long gone. I have seen lots of use of graphic items suggesting Istanbul (stars, crescent moons, etc) on Italian cymbals so I know they were well into that game.
 

zenstat

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Jim Hodgson said:
Am I going to have to go back and give that one another chance? (TBH I don't remember it sounding that good in person ... LOL!)

I just PM'd TDM for a tutorial on how to grab sound files. Zen? Is it really that easy?
It takes about a minute to learn if you are using Safari. The method will be different in Firefox or Safari, or in that other universe called "Windoze".

If you do pass by and listen to it in person, please let us know how it is different from the sound file. I really like being able to calibrate sound files from different online sites.
 

xipa4

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zenstat said:
There were Italian-made "Stanoples" in the 50's. I had a pair of hats that looked awesome, but sounded clanky.

The Paistes were completely unrelated and a nickelsilver low-line from the 60's. All I've seen have been quite light and thin, but NS12 is an alloy you either dig or you don't.
Interesting Captain,

Neither The Cymbal Book (Pinksterboer) nor Italian Vintage Drums and Cymbals (Luca Luciano) know about Stanople being produced by Italians. And it isn't on the photo Ronn Dunnett took at UFiP which shows most of the stamps they put on cymbals produced at the factory (at least I don't see it)



This site in Germany does know about Stambul as a Paiste name going back into the 1930s. No sign of Stanople until the 1950s:

http://www.nf-drums.com/paiste_fanpage_paiste_timeline.htm

So I'd be keen to know more about your Italian ones. Pics? I presume they are long gone. I have seen lots of use of graphic items suggesting Istanbul (stars, crescent moons, etc) on Italian cymbals so I know they were well into that game.
Here is the picture of Italian Stanople stamp:
 

TDM

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Jim Hodgson,

Yes, as zenstat noted, you can view the underlying HTML code and figure out the link to the file... sometimes. Often, sites obfuscate the links in various ways, which can make it hard to grab them. For this reason (and because it's easier), I use the FlashGot add-on for Firefox. It allows downloading page resources and works with YouTube and dozens of other sites. On the Maxwell site, FlashGot immediately popped up with the link to the source file of the cymbal that the media player was playing.

Important note: There is another Firefox add-on that is adware / virus ware: FlashGet. Do not confuse FlashGet with FlashGot. It's FlashGot that you want. Also note, FlashGot has nothing to do with Adobe Flash. It's not a flash downloader per se. Rather the "flash" in the title means "quick and easy" and the "got" means "got it for you". As far as I know, FlashGot only works with Firefox.
 

Jim Hodgson

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TDM said:
Jim Hodgson,

Yes, as zenstat noted, you can view the underlying code in your browser and figure out the link the file... sometimes. Often, sites obfuscate the links in various ways, which can make it hard to grab them. For this reason (and because it's easier), I use the FlashGot add-on for Firefox. It allows downloading page resources and works with YouTube and dozens of other sites. On the Maxwell site, FlashGot immediately popped up with the link to the source file of the cymbal that the media player was playing.

Important note: There is another Firefox add-on that is adware / virus ware: FlashGet. Do not confuse FlashGet with FlashGot. It's FlashGot that you want. Also note, FlashGot has nothing to do with Adobe Flash. It's not a flash downloader per se. Rather the "flash" in the title means "quick and easy" and the "got" means "got it for you". As far as I know, FlashGot only works with Firefox.
Hey thanks! Much appreciated...
 

toddlittle827

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Very much of the opinion now that the Paiste Stanople was a rebranded Dixie (or very similar to the Dixie) for sale through Ludwig starting in 1966. I have found no evidence that Paiste made Stanoples prior to 1966 despite that timeline saying they made them starting in 1950. Due to the font used on the emboss logo (similar to the 602 logo) I would say the oldest the Paiste Stanople could date back is to 1959 or 1960.

The Italian made Stanoples date back to the 1930s If I remember correctly.
 

zenstat

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Ancient resurrect. :glasses8:

In the meantime I have some nice images for the Italian Stanople cymbals. No question about their being Italian in origin. No 100% clear evidence of being UFiP versus one of the other Italian manufacturers. They do share the pressed in round MADE IN ITALY stamp which looks the same as the one on my 1950s UFiP cymbals. So I'm inclined towards UFiP even though the trademark doesn't appear on that picture in the UFiP head office. There is other evidence that the picture at head office might not include 100% of the stencil brands. Note these cymbals are not rotocast, they are gravity cast in the pre 1975(ish) Italian style. The swirl marks on the bell are not a sign of rotocasting. The are a product of lathing. A review of drum catalogs shows that Italian Stanople cymbals were offered in the Leedy catalogs from 1934 to 1942. After 1942 there are still offerings in the Leedy catalogs but the cymbals are not specifically called Stanople. These "generic" Italians last until the mid 1950s. In the mid 50s the Leedy catalog changed to offering Avedis and Alejian rather than Avedis and Italian. So these years are consistent with what was mentioned previously for Stanople Italians.

398367


398368


398369


398370


All of this and much more will find its way into the Italian page of cymbal.wiki the one stop shop for all things cymbal.
 

gkrk

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My first cymbal was an 11" Stanople made by Paiste. Got it for Christmas 1969 with a Ludwig 1400 stand. The cymbal's long gone but still use the stand sometimes. The next year I got a 14" Stanople with a cheapish knock off of a Slingerland stand. Still have the tilter but not the cymbal. Those cymbals weren't great but they were great to have! Just those two cymbals and my Rogers Luxor (Christmas 1968 for 3 or 4 years. They did sound cool using the rubber balls on the ends of Ludwig retractable brushes.

My older brother would bring his Teisco Del Rey electric guitar and small Univox amp into my room and we'd play "As Tears Go By," "Walk Don't Run," and another tune or two. First "rock" playing I ever did.

Jeremy
 

Elvis

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Does anybody know if these cymbals sound good? Sold through Leedy in the 30's 40's, made in Italy. Thanks!
Just to be certain, I believe the cymbal you're referring to is a "Stanople", not a "Paiste Stanople.
Same name, different companies.
 


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