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Peavy Radial Maples 751 anybody?

John

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In Seattle craigslist. Anybody ever play/own these?

(excerpt from CL ad below)
Drummers - dare to be different!

Great set of Peavey Radial 751 drums in Emerald Green. Includes: Bass, snare, 10"TT, 12" TT and 14" TT with mounting hardware but NO stands. Price is $600 (last 751 on the Bay were $1000 BIN).

Read about them on the web, they have an amazing rep - some say they are the best recording kits ever made!

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Some PEAVEY RADIAL history.............

The Radial Bridge design was created by inventor Steven Volpp and, until 2002, was manufactured and distributed through Peavey Electronics. The Radial Bridge drums are currently out of production and, with the exception of a few lingering kits here or there, unavailable.

What makes the premier lines of Peavey drums unique is the patented Radial Bridge System. The idea behind the Radial Bridge System is to create head tension without weighing down the shell with lugs and bolts that interfere with its resonance. The head tension is taken by heavy wooden hoops that support the heads with no mounting hardware attached to the shells. This allows the shells to perpetuate a louder and longer sustaining sound.

Peavey tom-toms were made with thin 1/10 of an inch thick, three-ply shells, and the bass drums with five ply shells. Conversely, Peavey's snare drums are made with heavy 1 3/4 inch thick shells that bring out the high overtones in the snare sound.

Peavey drums featuring the Radial Bridge System came in three levels: the Radial Pro 501, 751, and 1000. Peavey now only offers a conventional budget drum set line, the International Series II.
Peavey Electronics also incorporated its patented Radial Bridge technology into two other series of drum kits, each offered professional features at a price . Radial Pro 501 and 751 series drums featured round and flat bearing edges and thin shells with no tuning or mounting hardware attached. Seven inch deep wood snare drums, eighteen inch deep bass drums, (10 lugs per head) and pro style even-sized toms are all standard features. The Radial Bridges on the 500, 501, 750 and 751 are produced from a composite material that has been chosen to have resonant properties close to that of maple. This helps to keep the tone of the drums consistent throughout the range.

The 751 series tom shells are of four ply maple construction, while the snare and bass drums are six ply, available in high gloss ruby red, sapphire blue, emerald green and black onyx lacquer finishes. Double braced hardware for the 751 series includes two boom cymbal arms, hi hat stand with rotating legs, socket tom arms, tom platform stands and bass drum pedal.s an added bonus, both the 501 and 751 series are completely outfitted with isolation tom mounts, floor tom mount brackets, isolation drum spurs, stainless steel lug inserts and built-in microphone mounts.

You can tell just how old these kits are by looking at the badge. The early kits have a black badge that says "pat applied for" and bolts into the shell. The kits in the middle of the production life have a badge that is glued onto the shell and has the American patent number listed on it. The last kits also had a glued on badge and the american patent number and strangely they have the Australian patent number too.
 

troymiller

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I have a set of 1000's. I believe everything BUT the 1000's are imports - 1000's are US made. 1000's have a maple bridge system - others have a composite bridge. The shells ARE thin... don't know how they'd hold up under serious gigging (I don't gig mine). But, if taken care of and cased, I sure don't see a reason they wouldn't do fine - to me, wouldn't be that much different that carrying around a set of 3 ply Luddies.

And fwiw, I dunno about the others, but the 1000's sound FANTASTIC. :)
 

TommyWells

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Sound good. Lots of overtones. Not a "focused" kind of sound. Fragile drums. Saw`a bass drum come apart while being played at a Peavey party. Also, hard to transport safely, unless in anvil type cases. The radial bridge will rest on it's side, making direct contact, in a standard case. This will scar up the drum, unless the case is foamed. Even then, the drum is still resting on the wooden bridge, not on lugs or hardware. The shells of the drums, not the bridge, are VERY thin. I have seen punctured shells, where a cymbal stand or something similar made contact and punctured the shell. So, even though they are good sounding drums, be aware of the extra care necessary to keep them safe. And that if a bridge becomes separated from a shell, that it will take some maintenance.
 

troymiller

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Hey Tommy! (howareya?... hadn't talked to you for awhile!) I'm curious about what you're thinking when you said "not a focused kind of sound"...? You're right about the overtones (they resonate for days!) - but I would say that mine about as focused as anything I've got. VERY sharp 45 degree edges - nice attack and big tone. Maybe we're thinking of 'focused' differently... how would you define it?
 

PJD

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TommyWells said:
Saw`a bass drum come apart while being played at a Peavey party.


That must have been awkward!
 

Elvis

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dtk said:
the stories about the shells imploding mixed with no one buying the technology from Peavey make me a little afraid to go this route

Not to mention that most people had a hard time getting past the odd look of those giant rings encircling the outside of the shells.
I've played on either a 750 or a 751 before.
I think it was at the American Music branch that is (was?) on S. Tacoma Way (know the place I'm referring to, John?).
This was in the late 90's, back when I was still looking around for a new kit.
From what I can remember, the 7 series was a cost effective version of the top-of-the-line 1000's, with the difference being the hardware and a more limited finish availability.
I seem to remember Peavey drums possessing a rather "large", warm and resonant sound.


Elvis
 

John

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Elvis, not familiar with American Music in Tacoma.

I thought the Radial Maples were a fairly radical design. As with a lot of innovative designs it's the road (the gigging musician) that uncovers weaknesses. Too bad Peavey couldn't take the feedback I'm sure these drums generated and improved/strenghtened the design "flaws". We'd all probably be seeing more of these around...
 

Elvis

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John said:
Elvis, not familiar with American Music in Tacoma.

I thought the Radial Maples were a fairly radical design. As with a lot of innovative designs it's the road (the gigging musician) that uncovers weaknesses. Too bad Peavey couldn't take the feedback I'm sure these drums generated and improved/strenghtened the design "flaws". We'd all probably be seeing more of these around...

:oops: OOPS, further reflection now has me thinking it was a Guitar Center. :oops:
It was a big red building, right by the freeway. I seem to remember a Chuck E. Cheese's out that way and it wasn't too far there.

As for the demise of the drums themselves, I think, in this particular case, you have a product that was thought out to the point to where much modding of the design is going to yield either something that was not orignally intended, or a completely new design.
I think Peavey just put it out there to see how it would fly and when the "ferver" was over, they simply chose to stop making it.

JMHO.




Elvis
 

FloydZKing

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The big design flaw I see with these is that they used wood. The 1000s with the block maple bridges must have been a bear to make and the result was extra fragility. I'd bet the cheaper ones with the synthetic bridges were functionally superior.

And the shells themselves could have easily been made that thin or even thinner if they'd used fiberglass or another synthetic. As it is, three thin plies of maple is too weak.

In both cases wood was a poor choice, although I'm sure the market demands it. Just my take, but wood is far from an ideal material, especially for this design. I'm convinced that the REAL reason that drums are usually made of wood is because when these standards were set, pretty much everything was made of wood. Even car wheels. It was cheap, plentiful and easy to work.
 

TommyWells

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Troy: HELLO! I mean focused as in very little overtones. I like a tom to sing for a long time, but have it be the fundamental, not the higher overtones. That is the reason that so many producers and engineers like the Gretsch toms. The combination of thin shell, 30 degree edges and diecast hoops can create that kind of focused sound. The Peavey sound is very live and not focused on fundamental nearly as much, as the higher overtones are much more pronounced. That is why guys that played those drums usually used a more controlled coated or 2 ply head. To control the overtones. Not to stop them from resonating, just to cut down the overtones. I like a drum to RING, but not overtones. Fundamental. Is this clear as mud? :? If I could put 1 ply medium coated heads on my Gretsch toms and play them next to the Peavey toms with the same heads and tuned medium, the difference would be very obvious and we wouldn't be "Dancing about architecture." Anyway, they are just very different sounds. Overtones opposed to fundamental. Take your pick.... :) And keep in touch!
 


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