Pedal lube?

Cauldronics

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I know this has been done before, but what do you use for pedal lubricant? I have a cheapo generic double pedal that I’m using for an experiment and it might fly better with lube.
 
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LRod1707

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I know this has been done before, but what do you use for pedal lubricant? I have a cheapo generic double pedal that I’m using for an experiment and it might fly better with lube.
This is what I use and it works great for me:
 

CC Cirillo

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This is what I use and it works great for me:
I was just going to chime in with Hoppe’s No. 9, the Chanel No. 5 of lubricant.
 
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Loud

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On the u-joint, I use extra sticky grease. Lucas marine grease at the moment. I used marine grease or red and tacky on my bicycles and still had some left over.

As long as, when the pedal parts are rotating at high speed, nothing flings off, you’re OK. Thin lubes won’t last on the rotating parts.

If you have Allen bolts on the pedal, it might be a good idea to remove and lubricate them. You don’t want them to seize up and get stuck. Remove while the pedal is in a box or similar. If you drop the bolt, it can be hard to find.

Are the bearings sealed? If there is a metal cover on both sides, they are not serviceable. You should replace them. If one side has a plastic cover, you can remove the cover with a pin and grease.
 

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This is a great maintenance project that far too many drummers neglect for too long. I am delinquent here and need to do this as well.
 

supershifter2

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Not in many years. I did use lock type graphite several times. Didnt notice any difference and I play the pedal fast at times.
 

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LRod1707

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I was just going to chime in with Hoppe’s No. 9, the Chanel No. 5 of lubricant.
I wouldn't use Hoppes #9 alone. That's a bore cleaner and not a lubricant. You can use it to remove heavy grime but you would still need to use a lubricant afterwards. And the smell is horrible, LOL!!
 

gwbasley

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Up on the posts a light lube, (like 3 in 1, or any gun oil) is fine. Fot the footboard joints a dry graphite is much better because it wont collect dirt and dust.
I have to disagree with the poster who suggested 'sticky' grease. It will grab and hold on to any dirt particles that comes it's way and this will only serve to accerbate the very problem you are trying to solve. Dry lubricants are always a best choice for anything near the floor.
 

Cauldronics

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What chemical makeup would be best for a pedal lube? Maybe that is the right question.

There's not a lot of agreement on what to use in the replies, so maybe we just don't know. lol

I wonder what Trick, dw and Tama use.
 

Drm1979

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I keep a small can of wd-40 in my stick bag for when the occasion pops up that I might need it. Definitely with the straw attachment so as to not get any on the foot pedal.
 

Hop

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What chemical makeup would be best for a pedal lube? Maybe that is the right question.
There's not a lot of agreement on what to use in the replies, so maybe we just don't know. lol .....

I worked in the petrochemical industry for decades and wrote and taught about the lubrication of rotating equipment. The tribology rabbit hole is an easy one to fall into, with the alluring siren's call of the Stribeck Curve and whatnot... and as much as I love this stuff, I'd simply advise not to commit too many brain cells to the subject by over thinking it. The reality of it is, pedals simply don't have the loads or severe duty application that more complex or 'critical' rotating equipment does and therefore it's kind of difficult to make a bad choice when selecting a lubricant (again based how simple the equipment is).

So for any equipment type, consider that each lubrication material has it's pluses and minuses. However, none of the materials last forever and all will need periodic servicing including removal of contaminants and replacement of lubricating material. The lighter, thinner the material (liquid oil) the more frequent servicing you'll need as the oil will tend to move away from the parts needing lubrication and it does evaporate. The thicker, heavier the material (semi-solid grease), stays in place, is far less less prone to evaporation. Based on the application/service, additives are used in lubricating materials help improve the performance and extend the life of the material (so that part is a push).

If you're really OCD about the servicing part of it, be sure to remove all the old lubricant, thoroughly flush the contaminants (i.e. the metallic frictional debris left behind) and replace the lubrication.
If you're not, spray, place a few drops, or add a dollop of lubricant (liquid oil or grease) in the appropriate areas, wipe the excess off, and get back to playing!
The MTBF Δ between OCD and non-OCD lubrication service methods isn't worth the photons needed to type/display them. ;-)
 

jptrickster

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I rebuilt my WFL SK with nylon bushings on all moving parts to eliminate oil and grease mess and have a great working machine. Have a nice day!
 

Lee Van Kief

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I keep a small can of wd-40 in my stick bag for when the occasion pops up that I might need it. Definitely with the straw attachment so as to not get any on the foot pedal.
From what I’ve heard, WD40 is more of a solvent than a lubricant. It’s meant to break rust and grime free more than provide lubrication, although they’re happy to let people think that it’s a lubricant when it’s really substandard in that regard. To make things more confusing, WD40 is also now a brand name under which they sell actual lubricants made by the same company, just with “lubricant” or something similar thrown in the name.
 

Obiwandrumobe

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I worked in the petrochemical industry for decades and wrote and taught about the lubrication of rotating equipment. The tribology rabbit hole is an easy one to fall into, with the alluring siren's call of the Stribeck Curve and whatnot... and as much as I love this stuff, I'd simply advise not to commit too many brain cells to the subject by over thinking it. The reality of it is, pedals simply don't have the loads or severe duty application that more complex or 'critical' rotating equipment does and therefore it's kind of difficult to make a bad choice when selecting a lubricant (again based how simple the equipment is).

So for any equipment type, consider that each lubrication material has it's pluses and minuses. However, none of the materials last forever and all will need periodic servicing including removal of contaminants and replacement of lubricating material. The lighter, thinner the material (liquid oil) the more frequent servicing you'll need as the oil will tend to move away from the parts needing lubrication and it does evaporate. The thicker, heavier the material (semi-solid grease), stays in place, is far less less prone to evaporation. Based on the application/service, additives are used in lubricating materials help improve the performance and extend the life of the material (so that part is a push).

If you're really OCD about the servicing part of it, be sure to remove all the old lubricant, thoroughly flush the contaminants (i.e. the metallic frictional debris left behind) and replace the lubrication.
If you're not, spray, place a few drops, or add a dollop of lubricant (liquid oil or grease) in the appropriate areas, wipe the excess off, and get back to playing!
The MTBF Δ between OCD and non-OCD lubrication service methods isn't worth the photons needed to type/display them. ;-)
——————-
one man’s petrochemistry is another’s petrpornography.
 
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Cauldronics

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The MTBF Δ between OCD and non-OCD lubrication service methods isn't worth the photons needed to type/display them. ;-)
Well that’s good, cos I don’t know what MTBF (triangle) means but I can take apart a pedal enough to remove metal debris and do the rest.

I figured there might be a drummer on DFO with a background in this stuff. Thank you for your knowledge and insight. I was overthinking it.
 
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Drm1979

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From what I’ve heard, WD40 is more of a solvent than a lubricant. It’s meant to break rust and grime free more than provide lubrication, although they’re happy to let people think that it’s a lubricant when it’s really substandard in that regard. To make things more confusing, WD40 is also now a brand name under which they sell actual lubricants made by the same company, just with “lubricant” or something similar thrown in the name.
All I know is it stops the squeak.
 

Pat A Flafla

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I try to make stuff last forever and I really hate replacing hardware. Unless you're really, really careful, any oil or grease will collect dirt which could reduce service life. I only use the dry lock lube stuff. You have to reapply more often, but it allows me to keep using the same pedals for a very long time. Also, grease on the gig shirt is a drag.
 
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