Picked Up A Practice Pad and Sticks Today

WonderMonkey

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While I'm getting my guitars ready to sell and then buy a kit, I thought I'd get started with a practice pad and some sticks. I put some on order yesterday but since I was near our local music shop, I stopped in. They are notorious for being way more expensive than a big box shop (Guitar Center) but I thought I'd go there anyway. I picked up an Evans 12" and paid $8 more than I would at GC or online. COVID really helped them stay afloat because everybody was buying everything and if you have stock, it sold. I think that as that slows down they will start the slow death as they just can't compete on price. Before the big box came to town and the internet became a larger thing, they were the local kings. Now they will start to dwindle.

So, back to ME <-- the most important thing as we can all agree

I picked up another practice pad and set of sticks. In a month or so I'll have to go back to being onsite at work and I'll need a set to practice on there, so having two sets is ok with me as it removes excuses.

I unwrapped everything, pulled up a video (Drumeo) on how to hold my sticks, pulled up another video on paradiddles, and started whacking. My hands feel stupid, and my left hand feels even more stupid. I'm sure that goes away in time just like when I was playing guitar or anything else, but it sure felt awkward.

I should get several 5 minute practice times during the normal workday, between meetings or waiting for this and that. I'll add to that lunch and after work. I'm not going to practice every waking moment as I don't want to leap out there and then get tired of it. I'm going to be consistent and persistent, and keep going.
 

Squirrel Man

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One of the (many) mistakes I made when starting into rudiments (I've been playing off and on for some 40 years now, taking it more seriously this time around) is jumping into stuff beyond my fundamental skill level. I had sort of a jump on many beginners and I thought I could skip things - big mistake.

Don't shy away from singles and other more basic rudiments and the right way to do them, form and technique. Things build off of other things and if you skip over you're really not doing yourself a good service IMHO.

I don't have a wealth of great advice, there are others here far more experienced than I am with better advice but the other thing I'll leave you with is you can get bombarded with... stuff, advice, "do this, don't do that". It can be mind numbing if you're self-teaching. Find a couple good things to work on and when you do them well start branching out. Another one of my mistakes was trying to do many things at once.

Peace
 

WonderMonkey

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One of the (many) mistakes I made when starting into rudiments (I've been playing off and on for some 40 years now, taking it more seriously this time around) is jumping into stuff beyond my fundamental skill level. I had sort of a jump on many beginners and I thought I could skip things - big mistake.

Don't shy away from singles and other more basic rudiments and the right way to do them, form and technique. Things build off of other things and if you skip over you're really not doing yourself a good service IMHO.

I don't have a wealth of great advice, there are others here far more experienced than I am with better advice but the other thing I'll leave you with is you can get bombarded with... stuff, advice, "do this, don't do that". It can be mind numbing if you're self-teaching. Find a couple good things to work on and when you do them well start branching out. Another one of my mistakes was trying to do many things at once.

Peace
I've got the benefit of making those mistakes on guitar, so MAYBE I have a chance of making LESS mistakes on drums. I'll take all the advice I can get, and am attempting to find a few youtube channels that I can trust. Vic Furth, Drumeo, etc. all seem to be valid.

I LIKE the drudgery of hammering the fundamentals home. It is relaxing to me. In guitar I eventually got formal in my practice and made sure that I left time to work on songs instead of the fundamentals. I, at times, have the opposite problems of many. I will work on the fundamentals, run scales, etc. and go a long long time and not play a song. That means I'm technically proficient but useless in a jam session. I had to work on that until I could easily go jam, and my enjoyment of the instrument went WAY up. Luckily I was watching someone practice rudiments while playing along to songs and that sounded like a great way to enjoy them. In addition to just working the pad, of course.
 

Squirrel Man

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I've got the benefit of making those mistakes on guitar, so MAYBE I have a chance of making LESS mistakes on drums. I'll take all the advice I can get, and am attempting to find a few youtube channels that I can trust. Vic Furth, Drumeo, etc. all seem to be valid.

I LIKE the drudgery of hammering the fundamentals home. It is relaxing to me. In guitar I eventually got formal in my practice and made sure that I left time to work on songs instead of the fundamentals. I, at times, have the opposite problems of many. I will work on the fundamentals, run scales, etc. and go a long long time and not play a song. That means I'm technically proficient but useless in a jam session. I had to work on that until I could easily go jam, and my enjoyment of the instrument went WAY up. Luckily I was watching someone practice rudiments while playing along to songs and that sounded like a great way to enjoy them. In addition to just working the pad, of course.
Drumeo is one of those channels I don't really frequent, a lot of the stuff they do seems to skip over things for me. I can be thick-headed and maybe it's me. I'll message you a couple of the sources I use, maybe you'll find them more student-friendly.

I'm doing the same thing you did on guitar - beat to death the fundamentals, rudiments, conditioning and not play actual songs and I think that's not serving me well. I just ordered noise cancelling headphones and plan on working on songs more now. I can do bits and pieces of songs and a couple of songs from memory all the way through but I think I need to be doing more of that now. After a year plus of just doing the latter mostly. I don't think it was a mistake so much though rather maybe not the best use of my practice time.

I can do stuff like shuffles, Purdie, Bonham, a couple of Texas varieties but applying them musically is a hurdle for me because I'm not applying them for example. Fills and transitions are one of my weak points now because I'm not doing them.

Again, I've been at this for a while including recently so I'm cautious to advise here but maybe you'll be better served working on rudiments and conditioning more now if you're just starting into it. Someone else smarter than me on this might validate that or offer better advice.
 

WonderMonkey

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Drumeo is one of those channels I don't really frequent, a lot of the stuff they do seems to skip over things for me. I can be thick-headed and maybe it's me. I'll message you a couple of the sources I use, maybe you'll find them more student-friendly.

I'm doing the same thing you did on guitar - beat to death the fundamentals, rudiments, conditioning and not play actual songs and I think that's not serving me well. I just ordered noise cancelling headphones and plan on working on songs more now. I can do bits and pieces of songs and a couple of songs from memory all the way through but I think I need to be doing more of that now. After a year plus of just doing the latter mostly. I don't think it was a mistake so much though rather maybe not the best use of my practice time.

I can do stuff like shuffles, Purdie, Bonham, a couple of Texas varieties but applying them musically is a hurdle for me because I'm not applying them for example. Fills and transitions are one of my weak points now because I'm not doing them.

Again, I've been at this for a while including recently so I'm cautious to advise here but maybe you'll be better served working on rudiments and conditioning more now if you're just starting into it. Someone else smarter than me on this might validate that or offer better advice.
It will be a few months before I get a kit so I have no choice but to just use my practice pad. When I see a drum kit in site I'll engage with an instructor, and am actually looking into sources for the instructors now. If they think there is value in working together before I actually get a kit, I'll do that. I don't want to make any large self-taught errors.

I'll take any resources that you have, and I will appreciate them. Maybe I can find the video I watched where they were doing the paradiddles along to some random song? You can kill a few birds with one stick.
 

Squirrel Man

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So short list because I'm sensitive to bombarding lol but, all Youtube channels - Rob "Beatdown" Brown is my go-to guy for lots of stuff to work on. His vids could be a little shorter and to the point but he really breaks things down in easy to comprehend ways and he has TONS of vids. I even bought his t-shirt (three of them lol).

The other one I'm on just recently is Eric Fisher. A really down to earth approach and he simplifies difficult things and doesn't blast you with an unmanageable amount of stuff, kind of a bang for your practice time buck IMO.

Hope that helps.
 

WonderMonkey

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I happen to watch one by Rob Brown earlier today. I like his style of interacting. I'll look up Eric Fisher and add him to my list.
 

Pat A Flafla

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If you're OK with some initial repetitive drudgery, you can lay a really solid foundation by playing millions of full height legato strokes on one hand at a time, while looking at your grip in a mirror to make sure wrist is hinging, no radius/ulna rotation is happening, back fingers are away from palm, and fulcrum is set properly.
 

WonderMonkey

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If you're OK with some initial repetitive drudgery, you can lay a really solid foundation by playing millions of full height legato strokes on one hand at a time, while looking at your grip in a mirror to make sure wrist is hinging, no radius/ulna rotation is happening, back fingers are away from palm, and fulcrum is set properly.
I don't know what all that is, but I'll look it up.
 

Matched Gripper

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While I'm getting my guitars ready to sell and then buy a kit, I thought I'd get started with a practice pad and some sticks. I put some on order yesterday but since I was near our local music shop, I stopped in. They are notorious for being way more expensive than a big box shop (Guitar Center) but I thought I'd go there anyway. I picked up an Evans 12" and paid $8 more than I would at GC or online. COVID really helped them stay afloat because everybody was buying everything and if you have stock, it sold. I think that as that slows down they will start the slow death as they just can't compete on price. Before the big box came to town and the internet became a larger thing, they were the local kings. Now they will start to dwindle.

So, back to ME <-- the most important thing as we can all agree

I picked up another practice pad and set of sticks. In a month or so I'll have to go back to being onsite at work and I'll need a set to practice on there, so having two sets is ok with me as it removes excuses.

I unwrapped everything, pulled up a video (Drumeo) on how to hold my sticks, pulled up another video on paradiddles, and started whacking. My hands feel stupid, and my left hand feels even more stupid. I'm sure that goes away in time just like when I was playing guitar or anything else, but it sure felt awkward.

I should get several 5 minute practice times during the normal workday, between meetings or waiting for this and that. I'll add to that lunch and after work. I'm not going to practice every waking moment as I don't want to leap out there and then get tired of it. I'm going to be consistent and persistent, and keep going.
FYI, you will find that there are more than one “correct” ways to hold the sticks and I would recommend that you be open minded and flexible about finding the grip(s) that work best for you depending on the application.

In addition, there are several well established techniques for striking a drum with a stick that all serve a purpose that will help make you the best drummer you can be. In my view the 3 most important techniques are the Gladstone method, Moeller method and the open/closed method. They all overlap/dovetail with each other and are worth your while to learn. But remember, like any instrumental technique method, this is a lifetime journey. There is no ultimate arrival.

The below videos are: an introduction to Gladstone (I can’t find a free comprehensive lesson on YouTube), and comprehensive lessons on the Moeller and open/closed techniques. Hope you enjoy.



 
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WonderMonkey

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FYI, you will find that there are more than one “correct” ways to hold the sticks and I would recommend that you be open minded and flexible about finding the grip(s) that work best for you depending on the application.

In addition, there are several well established techniques for striking a drum with a stick that all serve a purpose that will help make you the best drummer you can be, including the Gladstone method, Moeller method and the open/closed method.

The below videos are: an introduction to Gladstone (I can’t find a free comprehensive lesson on YouTube), and comprehensive lessons on the Moeller and open/closed techniques. Hope you enjoy.
Thanks! I don't care how I hold the stick as long as it fits the situation and whatever my body makes do.
 

Matched Gripper

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Thanks! I don't care how I hold the stick as long as it fits the situation and whatever my body makes do.
Think of it like golf. You can spend a lifetime trying to correct your swing when the problem is your grip. Are you familiar with the saying: “You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make him drink?” :)

FYI, I edited my previous post after you quoted it.
 

WonderMonkey

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Think of it like golf. You can spend a lifetime trying to correct your swing when the problem is your grip. Are you familiar with the saying “You can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make him drink?” :)

FYI, I edited my previous post after you quoted it.
I'm familiar. Hopefully, I wasn't coming across like that. I meant it as "I'll learn the other ways and apply them in the needed situation" type thing. The "I'm don't care ..." was to mean I am open to other grips.
 


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