Pink spots on cymbals after cleaning

AgDrumma07

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Our gig last weekend got rained out halfway through though fortunately the stage was covered, so all of the water contact was just mist. After letting all of my gear air-dry for a few days, I was planning to clean my cymbals tonight.

All of my cymbals are brilliant finish and I’ve been using Groove Juice since longer than I can remember. I purchased the bottle I have now back in December and had killer results when I cleaned everything back then. However, tonight, after only getting to a crash and a splash, I’ve noticed these light pink spots on both cymbals.

Pictures are below after cleaning and rinsing with warm water. I decided to not do the rest until I figure this out.

Any ideas?
 

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Pibroch

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Did you leave the product for longer than 30 seconds before rinsing? Could there have been larger drops of the product where the pink spots formed, rather than just a fine spray?

Regardless I suspect it’s just copper (possibly resulting from the precipitation of copper sponge while acids in the groove juice were in contact with the bronze).

I suppose it’s possible the Groove Juice has been doing slow coloration damage to your cymbals since you began using it and it’s just started to become noticeable. Some people say you can never fully rinse off the acids that have been in contact with the cymbal.

What’s in Groove Juice:
 
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Gcort49

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Curious, you did not mention the cymbal name/Mfg. I only mention this, because some cymbals have a protective coating placed on during the making process, and should not be cleaned. (I am sure you know this, but mention anyway)> The Kerope, Paiste 900S, Paiste Big Beat, I believe and others
 

Cliff DeArment

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Wanted to wait before others chimed in...

Been trying to figure this out.

There's really only one way for bronze to look pink. Copper and Zinc. But, here's the rub... the amount of Zinc in a B20 cymbal is about 0.001%. So, there's obviously something else involved. It's possible this action is from drinks or food. A usual carbonated drink can have Zinc anywhere from 10mg to 20mg per soft drink (from NutritionData), and foods such as meats, shellfish, beans, seeds, etc, also including Zinc. It's easy to drop food, or even when talking with a drink once in a while. Maybe even from sweat? Depends on what you eat. Add OA (Oxalic Acid), found in Groove Juice, BFK and other somewhat strong acids for a cymbal, could react with Zinc and Copper to create a bond (chelating).

That's the best I can come up with.

Either way, I'd bet it will be pink for a very long time (like forever?).

It's rarely ideal to use acid on a cymbal. If needed, there are better, milder (yes, slower to clean) options than OA. If you MUST use it, wash the cymbal first, then clean, then wash again.
 
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AgDrumma07

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Curious, you did not mention the cymbal name/Mfg. I only mention this, because some cymbals have a protective coating placed on during the making process, and should not be cleaned. (I am sure you know this, but mention anyway)> The Kerope, Paiste 900S, Paiste Big Beat, I believe and others
Good catch and leaving that info out wasn't on purpose. I play almost all A Custom along with a Brilliant Sweet Ride, Oriental China, and Platinum New Beats. Occasionally I swap in a Z Custom crash depending on the gig.

I've used Groove Juice on all of them, aside from the hats, for years.
 

AgDrumma07

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Did you leave the product for longer than 30 seconds before rinsing? Could there have been larger drops of the product where the pink spots formed, rather than just a fine spray?

Regardless I suspect it’s just copper (possibly resulting from the precipitation of copper sponge while acids in the groove juice were in contact with the bronze).

I suppose it’s possible the Groove Juice has been doing slow coloration damage to your cymbals since you began using it and it’s just started to become noticeable. Some people say you can never fully rinse off the acids that have been in contact with the cymbal.

What’s in Groove Juice:
I usually do 30-60 seconds depending on dirty the cymbal is. I know the instructions say 30 seconds, but after using the product for years, I've found results vary considerably. The spray nozzle on my last bottle stopped doing a fine mist which is why I purchased a new one. The big droplets actually made cleaning the cymbal more difficult.

It's interesting that this happened to one cymbal that was exposed to the rain last weekend and to one cymbal that's been sitting in my closet for months. I'm wondering if there's an issue with the Groove Juice product as well.
 

AgDrumma07

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Wanted to wait before others chimed in...

Been trying to figure this out.

There's really only one way for bronze to look pink. Copper and Zinc. But, here's the rub... the amount of Zinc in a B20 cymbal is about 0.001%. So, there's obviously something else involved. It's possible this action is from drinks or food. A usual carbonated drink can have Zinc anywhere from 10mg to 20mg per soft drink (from NutritionData), and foods such as meats, shellfish, beans, seeds, etc, also including Zinc. It's easy to drop food, or even when talking with a drink once in a while. Maybe even from sweat? Depends on what you eat. Add OA (Oxalic Acid), found in Groove Juice, BFK and other somewhat strong acids for a cymbal, could react with Zinc and Copper to create a bond (chelating).

That's the best I can come up with.

Either way, I'd bet it will be pink for a very long time (like forever?).

It's rarely ideal to use acid on a cymbal. If needed, there are better, milder (yes, slower to clean) options than OA. If you MUST use it, wash the cymbal first, then clean, then wash again.
With as many gigs and different venues we play, there's no shortage of what could get spilled on our gear. Houston rain certainly doesn't help.

I'm open to other cymbal cleaning products. Groove Juice has been so easy since you just spray and rinse (basically). Any suggestions for brilliant cymbals?
 

Gcort49

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I hardly clean cymbals. I believe, like wine, they 'taste' sweeter with time and age. If I do clean, I always use warm water in the kitchen sink, some liquid soap, always DAWN. It has no harsh chemical. Hell, biologist use DAWN to clean ducks/birds caught in ocean oil spills, so you know it's safe. I also use a Magic Eraser. Its not abrasive and won't scratch...always does a good job
 

Cliff DeArment

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There are basically 2 options:

1. Clean it fast.

2. Do what's best for the bronze.

It's either Acid or a Base. Pick one.
 


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