Playing shuffles

blueshadow

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"Tony from Austin" demonstrates an interesting variation of the Texas shuffle where he leaves out the triplet on 1 and 3 on the snare drum which helps when you're playing up tempo.
That's normally what I see as the Texas shuffle, I think it's Layton's influence the main thing is to get the ah 2 and ah 4 accented whether that's all you play or if you play all the notes like Glass does in his video and then the Bissonette video I posted he plays it a little different as well but has the same feel....lots of variation in it
 

CC Cirillo

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At 1:43 I meant to say rimshot not backbeat . It’s kinda long but what the heck I show a couple of ways to shuffle . There is a play along to a blues shuffle at the end .

When I take shuffle lessons, I think they have a bit more authority when the dude is wearing overalls.

Well done, dog.
 

Matched Gripper

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Frank Beard is playing the shuffle on his left hand on the snare on LaGrange. You can hear it on the recording if you listen closely and you can sometimes hear it in the various live videos of them playing the song. What he IS doing a lot in these performances is playing quarter notes in his RIGHT hand but that partial triplet that creates the shuffle is consistently coming from his left hand. Here is one example where you can hear it.


On the Howard Stern show clip mentioned earlier in this thread, you can hear it AND see it when he is playing the basic part on the song before they start going into the extra bits:

You are right. That is a Texas shuffle that can be seen in the second video. I wonder if Frank Beard played in the original studio recording?
 

jaymandude

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You are right. That is a Texas shuffle that can be seen in the second video. I wonder if Frank Beard played in the original studio recording?
I think it was Freddie Gruber on the original
 

Phloid

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As a former rock drummer trying to play other genres like blues, the fast shuffle is the BANE of my playing. For the life of me, I just can't get the hi-hat part down consistently. Of course I could play a quarter note hat or ride on top, but that's kinda cheating. Anything faster than about 120bps, and I fumble the hats almost all of the time.

Anyone else struggle with the shuffle or any other pattern? I know the remedy...start slow and build up.

Here are a perfect example of a song I could probably never play the hat part:

For me playing shuffles is easy. The hi hat part in your example is a swing style pattern. For me no big deal. For a rock drummer a little harder since in rock hi hat patterns are more steady. For me I struggle to play steady rock beats because i tend to give everything a shuffle. If I play a steady rock grove I end up a couple bars in board and start a shuffle pattern that is for me more fun to play and enhances the drum part and song. Also for me rock drum fills are hard and throw off my rock beat and timing. With a shuffle grove my fills can be more melodic and funkier than just a solid straight rock fill. For me the funky shuffle grove fill is easier to get back into the main shuffle beat and stay on tempo. Usually I play blues, funk, and jazz fusion beats. I find these to be more fun and interesting to play rather than a straight rock beat. That said Bonham, Paccaro and others used shuffle beats in great rock songs. Also for me playing slow I struggle with and find it harder to keep a steady time. I prefer to play around 120bpm, anything much slower for me is harder to keep a steady shuffle grove. Practicing with a click helps the steady grove but the click seems to throw off my fills. I like a click to help me find the tempo and get into a grove then shut it off. I find that gets me doing the correct tempo, allows me to play fills without worrying about a click and I can go back to the original grove and tempo just fine.
 

TonkaDrummer

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That’s not a shuffle. A shuffle is playing the first and third notes of a triplet. You can play it in high hat, snare, both together, split between bass drum and snare. Here are some variations on the Chicago shuffle:




In any event, if you want to play a great shuffle, you have to use the open/closed technique. Here is a great lesson on open/closed.


PS: If I can find some good examples of a Texas shuffle I’ll post them.
Living in the Twin Cities, I've met and played with Gordy a few times. Good guy, great drummer and amazing technician....crazy chops.
 

Matched Gripper

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Living in the Twin Cities, I've met and played with Gordy a few times. Good guy, great drummer and amazing technician....crazy chops.
Yup! You can get a taste of his chops in that video I posted. And his one handed 16th note samba is nothing short of phenomenal.
 
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donaldshultz

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As a former rock drummer trying to play other genres like blues, the fast shuffle is the BANE of my playing. For the life of me, I just can't get the hi-hat part down consistently. Of course I could play a quarter note hat or ride on top, but that's kinda cheating. Anything faster than about 120bps, and I fumble the hats almost all of the time.

Anyone else struggle with the shuffle or any other pattern? I know the remedy...start slow and build up.

Here are a perfect example of a song I could probably never play the hat part:

My go to shuffle at most any tempo is something I call a ‘swuffle’. Swing pattern on cymbal, ‘e and a’ on 2 and 4 on the snare. Listen to Chris Layton or Harlem Shuffle by Herlin Riley. And don’t forget to ‘hook’ the backbeats. (Grace note just before 2 and 4, hang that last snare note back)
 

Fibes

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As a former rock drummer trying to play other genres like blues, the fast shuffle is the BANE of my playing. For the life of me, I just can't get the hi-hat part down consistently. Of course I could play a quarter note hat or ride on top, but that's kinda cheating. Anything faster than about 120bps, and I fumble the hats almost all of the time.

Anyone else struggle with the shuffle or any other pattern? I know the remedy...start slow and build up.

Here are a perfect example of a song I could probably never play the hat part:


Sound more like this guy is playing the typical jazz spang-a-land thing on hat, but with a very straight feel it accenting the quarter notes. He's not doing a full hit every note shuffle.
 

Tom Holder

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Fred Below plays an awesome shuffle on those old Chess sides. "T-Bone Shuffle" is also a great example. Fabulous Thunderbirds' first four records, esp. "Butt Rockin'". "La Grange" by ZZ Top. OLD Fleetwood Mac (pre-Stevie) played some nice smooth shuffles. Freddie King's "Hide Away". Quarter notes on the BD, absolutely. Four-On-The-Floor, baby! Play the same "dotted eighth note" pattern with both hands, but hit the rim of your snare on two and four. Just for fun, at your next gig, start a shuffle tune with that Grand Funk Railroad crap, and then after one verse and a chorus, switch over to Four-On-The-Floor. Watch EVERYBODY get up and start dancing! It's like MAGIC! It's a primal thing, a good shuffle. You just can't sit still, if you've got any soul in you at all! Also, open up your hi-hat just a tiny bit... get a "slushy" sound. Be loose and cozy. Relax. Use your wrists, not your arms. Play hi-hats for the verses, switch over to ride cymbal during the solo section. Go back to the slushy hi-hat after the solos. It's not as easy as it sounds, especially when you've been playing it wrong for twenty years like I did. Hound Dog is absolutely correct in his previous post. Practice with a band, or at least a bass player. Quick tempos will be a bit painful at first, but stick with it. It gets easier and easier over time. Believe me, please... I played "Grand Funk" shuffles for YEARS, but after I finally learned how to play the "magic lick"... Four-On-The-Floor & dotted eighths with both hands... I get TONS of compliments on my playing from blues people. Be simple and loose. Practice makes perfect!
 

old_K_ride

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As a former rock drummer trying to play other genres like blues, the fast shuffle is the BANE of my playing. For the life of me, I just can't get the hi-hat part down consistently. Of course I could play a quarter note hat or ride on top, but that's kinda cheating. Anything faster than about 120bps, and I fumble the hats almost all of the time.

Anyone else struggle with the shuffle or any other pattern? I know the remedy...start slow and build up.

Here are a perfect example of a song I could probably never play the hat part:

maybe its just me but I'm hearing 1/4 note hats...not a shuffle pattern or even a swing pattern on this
 

jsp210

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This is the feel to study and study and study while working on both left hand and right hand swing at increasing tempos. Takes time to develop but it has to feel good for everyone involved.

 

mtarrani

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Sorry mtarrani but your ghost notes are so prominent your shuffle sounds more like a march.
It may, but it's still a shuffle and it supports what the lead melody instruments wanted. That is what my job is all about - supporting the music.
 
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At 1:43 I meant to say rimshot not backbeat . It’s kinda long but what the heck I show a couple of ways to shuffle . There is a play along to a blues shuffle at the end .

Nice! I like that variation that you show in the first part of the video. It's one that I haven't seen, much less even thought of but that I've probably heard, though never realized how it's played. Your example where you switch between that one and what seems to be a more common one is really good. I can play some maybe more complicated sounding jazz stuff, but honestly, it's the shuffle thing that I consider to be more difficult and something that as yet I haven't figure out to a level that really feels good to me. Decades ago I took a few lessons from a local blues drummer who was a master of that sort of thing and learned just the very basics, but never seemed to get the sort of snap that really makes that stuff work. Drummers seem to be very much unsung heros of the blues idiom, but to me at least the ones who do shuffle feels are doing the kind of thing that's difficult to do really well... It's the kind of specialty that might not seem all that diffuclt until you actually try it!
 

jeffintampa

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As a former rock drummer trying to play other genres like blues, the fast shuffle is the BANE of my playing. For the life of me, I just can't get the hi-hat part down consistently. Of course I could play a quarter note hat or ride on top, but that's kinda cheating. Anything faster than about 120bps, and I fumble the hats almost all of the time.

Anyone else struggle with the shuffle or any other pattern? I know the remedy...start slow and build up.

Here are a perfect example of a song I could probably never play the hat part:

 


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